Blog – Copyright Clearance Center https://www.copyright.com Rights Licensing Expert Fri, 07 May 2021 15:42:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.copyright.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/cropped-ccc-favicon-32x32.png Blog – Copyright Clearance Center https://www.copyright.com 32 32 Where Did You Get That Book? https://www.copyright.com/blog/where-did-you-get-that-book/ Fri, 07 May 2021 13:56:24 +0000 https://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=31479 In the U.S., public library usage stats reveal a 31% drop in building use over eight years, up to 2018.

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Tim Coates, the former Waterstones managing director, has released The Freckle Report 2021, the second publication from Coates to focus on public library service in the U.S., the U.K., and Australia.

The report is based on public data reported by government library agencies (including the Institute for Museum and Library Services in the U.S.) as well as a proprietary consumer survey, “Where Did You Get That Book?” commissioned by Coates explores reading behavior.

“This is the second such report from Coates exploring public library stats in the US, the UK, and Australia,” says Andrew AlbanesePublishers Weekly senior writer. “The topline of the report is on its face eye-opening. In the U.S., there’s been a 31% drop in public library building use over eight years, up to 2018.”

Where Did You Get That Book?

Albanese continues, “I focus on the U.S. figures, but in addition to the 31% decline in library building use cited in the U.S., Coates reports a 22% drop over 10 years in Australia, and a stunning 70% decline in the U.K. since the year 2000.”

The 2021 reader survey, conducted in April, includes the impact of the pandemic on reading behavior.

“In a bit of good news, Coates found that more consumers across all age groups were reading more during the pandemic,” Albanese tells CCC. “In the U.S., 87% of respondents said they made use of a book in 2021.”

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Customer Experience vs. Customer Success vs. Customer Service https://www.copyright.com/blog/customer-experience-vs-customer-success-vs-customer-service/ Thu, 06 May 2021 08:33:19 +0000 https://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=31450 How They’re Different, How They’re Related, and Why Each One Matters to Your Organization.

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Business success comes from creating value for customers. But beyond the services and products offered, every bit of engagement with your customer adds to – or detracts from – the value you’ve worked so hard to create. That’s why companies focus on how to find new ways to build value for customers at every step. In this post, I’ll explore three of the most prevalent – and impactful – value-creation initiatives: customer experience, customer success and customer service. While each program is unique, they all share a common thread: a laser-like focus on the customer.

Customer Experience

Customer Experience (CX) is much like it sounds; it’s the experience that your customers have with your brand along the entire buyer and customer journey. It encompasses everything from preliminary visits to your website to conversations with sales reps to how readily available key resources are to your clients’ experience with your product and far beyond. CX is the collective perception your customer has of your brand. It’s often the reason they choose – or don’t choose – your organization and it’s incredibly important.

My colleague Deb Mariniello recently offered her perspective on CX saying “[Our customers] don’t need to work with us, but instead they choose to…we don’t take that for granted. Our hope and expectation are that our Customer Experience initiative will help us continue to serve [our customers’] needs in a way that makes their jobs easier and their professional lives more pleasant and productive—and that they will continue to choose us.”

Customer Service

We think of customer service as the assistance we offer both before and after customers buy our solutions. This includes phone support, email, webpage chat bots, social media and more. Customer service is reactive, meaning that it’s the way your team supports customers after they’ve come to you with an issue. It’s the collection of interactions you have with your customers to help them navigate a challenge and accomplish their desired outcome—and it makes up part of the whole Customer Experience.

Customer Success

Customer Success is a proactive methodology that focuses on helping your customers get the most value from your product or service. That means anticipating future customer challenges and proactively finding solutions to alleviate them. In our view, a strong customer success strategy ensures customers achieve their desired outcome each and every time they use your product or service. Often, this means diligently analyzing your customers’ journey within your organization—and with your products or services—and anticipating and alleviating any potential hurdles. For example, do you expect that a future enhancement might cause confusion while users adjust to a new workflow? A good Customer Success strategy means committing the resources to address it, identifying the potential tripping points, taking steps to mitigate any confusion, and delivering a seamless user interface—without interruption. Ensuring that your customers achieve their desired outcome each and every time decreases customer churn and increases upsell opportunities. And like Customer Service, Customer Success is a component of the entire Customer Experience (i.e., your customers’ perception of your brand).

Creating value for customers starts with the product or solution, but the value grows with a comprehensive customer experience, service and success strategy. At CCC, we continually align our solution offering with how our customers will interact with that solution and with us.

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Inclusion Means Including Everyone https://www.copyright.com/blog/inclusion-means-including-everyone/ Wed, 05 May 2021 07:37:34 +0000 https://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=31386 Creating barrier-free, fully inclusive content is a worthy goal, even if the task seems daunting.

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As authors who have recommitted ourselves to the ideas of diversity, equity, and inclusion in our professional lives, one of the many struggles we face is making access to our content inclusive. However inclusive of race, gender, age, and other aspects of humanity our writing is, it is important to also ask ourselves whether all potential readers are able to access it.

As an author, I have often left accessibility issues completely in the hands of the professionals among our publishing team. However, I realize more and more that, in many ways, that sort of inclusion starts with me.

The first thing I want to do as an author is learn all I can about what needs exist among my potential readers. As a hearing-impaired person, I often think of that first. But over the decades, I have learned that there are many types and degrees of auditory impairment. I have also learned about many types of visual challenges, cognitive impairments, emotional and mental health conditions, economic and social challenges, and various sorts of physical challenges.

The next logical step is to learn about ways that we (my publishers and I) can accommodate the many needs that exist in accessing the content of my writing. If I know the strategies used to make content more accessible to a diversity of readers, I can have that in my mind as I decide how to tell the story I want to tell in my article, chapter, or book. Such thinking makes it more likely that needs will be accommodated as the project develops to a final publication, especially if I make note of my thinking to my publisher.

For example, I can consider the use of color in diagrams to make them more easily understood by readers with color vision deficiency (CVD). I can think about the implications of suggesting an audio glossary, which may help visually impaired readers, but which also may require a transcript with written pronunciation guides for those with hearing challenges. Knowing about barriers faced by readers on the autism spectrum or other unique cognitive abilities helps me to under- stand that directness and clarity in my storytelling is of vital importance.

As we authors have gotten better at this type of inclusion, I’ve noticed that such accommodations help all our readers. Clarity of message helps all readers, not just those on the autism spectrum. Captioned audio content and visual content with audio descriptions can help any reader, not just those with challenges. Everyone ends up with better access to our content. Win-win-win.

Creating barrier-free, fully inclusive content is a worthy goal, even if the task seems daunting.

This article previously appeared in The Academic Author Newsletter (Spring 2021). Republished with permission.

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CCC Hosts Virtual Panel Discussion on “Automating Information Management and Discovery in Emerging Life Science Organizations” https://www.copyright.com/blog/ccc-hosts-virtual-panel-discussion-on-automating-information-management-and-discovery-in-emerging-life-science-organizations/ Tue, 04 May 2021 14:47:23 +0000 https://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=31398 On Wednesday, 19 May 2021 at 11:00am EDT, 5:00pm CEST, CCC will host a 60-minute virtual panel discussion on “Automating Information… Read more

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On Wednesday, 19 May 2021 at 11:00am EDT, 5:00pm CEST, CCC will host a 60-minute virtual panel discussion on “Automating Information Management and Discovery in Emerging Life Science Organizations.”

In emerging life science organizations, R&D is, in many ways, the foundation of the company and often the biggest driver of success. A vast amount of research is done before the pipeline is advanced to the point of developing a marketable product, yet speed to market is critical. In early days, budgets are tight, resources and staff are lean, and thoughts about allocating a dedicated information management professional are usually not feasible.

Without centralized information management tools in place, how can you be sure your organization is being efficient in its access to scientific literature and research, facilitating collaboration across teams to drive innovation, and remaining copyright compliant?

Join me, along with Heather Desmarais, President of HJD Consulting LLC and Lisa Geller, PhD, JD, Head of Intellectual Property, Frequency Therapeutics, and Sarah Jo Smith, APTD, Training Coordinator, Signature Science, LLC, for an engaging discussion around the unique research and information challenges of emerging life science organizations. You’ll also get a brief demo of how CCC’s RightFind® content workflow solution can deliver a more efficient research process, cost-effective, self-service information center, simplified copyright compliance, and a strong competitive advantage.

Register now

Featuring:

Heather Desmarais

Heather Desmarais, President, HDJ Consulting LLC

Lisa Geller, PhD, JD, Head of Intellectual Property, Frequency Therapeutics

Sarah Jo Smith, APTD, Training Coordinator, Signature Science, LLC

Chris Hilbert, Sales Solution Engineer, Copyright Clearance Center

As companies grow, their information needs grow, as well. CCC recognizes the difficulty in balancing current needs with future growth and is committed to providing smaller life science companies with a sustainable workflow solution to address information “underload” and copyright compliance challenges that grows with the company. Learn more about CCC’s RightFind for Emerging Life Science Companies.

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Making a Back-Up for the World’s Knowledge https://www.copyright.com/blog/making-a-back-up-for-the-worlds-knowledge/ Mon, 03 May 2021 13:00:08 +0000 https://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=31380 For research libraries, there is a strong need to champion the importance of digital preservation.

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In April, a forest fire descended Cape Town’s Table Mountain, quickly reaching the University of Cape Town. Historic buildings on campus fell to the flames, including Jagger Library, home to rare collections of South African books and other literature such as anti-apartheid pamphlets. Because some of the collection was digitized, however, losses to the UCT archives are thought to be limited.

University libraries around the world exist to provide safe and secure homes to vast stores of published and unpublished materials, in physical and digital form, from books and journals to illustrations and photos.

In 1999, Stanford University librarians pioneered a new field of digital-first archiving when they created LOCKS – an acronym for “Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe.” The virtual organization CLOCKS or “Controlled LOCKS” now maintains authoritative versions of 43 million journal articles and 240,000 book titles, as well as a growing collection of supplementary materials and metadata information.

Making a Back-Up for the World’s Knowledge

“For research libraries, there is a strong need to champion the importance of digital preservation,” says Alicia Wise, who was recently appointed Executive Director of CLOCKSS.

“Investment in these services helps ensure researchers will have long-term, continuing access to the journals and books that they value.”

Wise has long been active on access issues for research information. Most recently, she worked as a consultant in scholarly communications, advising libraries, funders, and publishers on sustainable strategies for navigating the rapidly changing information landscape.

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Publisher Staff Press for Change https://www.copyright.com/blog/publisher-staff-press-for-change/ Fri, 30 Apr 2021 12:47:51 +0000 https://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=31366 Publishing staff are insisting on change and pursuing change at a pace that may be more aggressive than leadership would like.

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On Wednesday, the New York Times reported on a new relationship now emerging between publishing leadership and their staffs.

The front page story fixed on the recent uproar by Simon & Schuster employees who objected to the publisher signing former Vice President Mike Pence to a two-book deal as well as agreeing to distribute a title by John Mattingly, a police officer involved in shooting Breonna Taylor in Louisville during a botched raid last March.

“Publishing staff are insisting on change and pursuing change at a pace that may be more aggressive than leadership would like,” observes Andrew AlbanesePublishers Weekly senior writer.

Publisher Staff Press for Change

“A new, more diverse generation is asserting its power,” Albanese tells CCC. “In an industry that has resisted change for so long, this is an important moment.”

Although S&S did decline to carry the Mattingly book, CEO Jonathan Karp has defended his decision to publish Pence. This week, S&S also announced plans for a book by Kellyanne Conway, a former White House advisor.

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Recommendation Systems and the Importance of Effective Information https://www.copyright.com/blog/recommendation-systems-and-the-importance-of-effective-information/ Thu, 29 Apr 2021 08:39:33 +0000 https://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=31347 The primary goals of recommendation systems are to encourage demand as well as to actively attract users.

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During the past few years, with the explosion of information being served as online media content, eCommerce, and streaming platforms, finding and accessing desired information in an optimal way has become crucial for many companies and research centers. With multiple platform players constantly competing for users’ attention, the actionable information provided by recommendation systems are one of Internet’s most popular features. They are also pragmatically useful in attracting users to a company’s web offerings.

Recommendation systems (also referred as recommendation engines) are critical in some industries, for example in Video on Demand (VoD) or eCommerce platforms, where they can generate a significant amount of income and help companies differentiate from competitors. Further, recommendation systems have the potential to change the way websites and applications communicate with users —they are essentially a solution that offers relevant and effective information in the wrapper of a personalized user experience. This is vital in the digital era, where users may be overwhelmed by the flood of information they receive from digital media and other sources. Therefore, providing the pertinent information they may need at each specific moment is key to standing above the crowd.

The primary goals of recommendation systems are to encourage demand as well as to actively attract users. Since one of the main aspects of recommendation systems is proactivity, they will suggest information to the user that may be of interest without the user having to look for it explicitly and in accordance with his or her predilections, which may be unintentionally limiting.  These recommendations are based on users’ past activity, attributes, contextual information and in similar users based on their buying histories, demographic data, and other attributes.

Most Recommendation systems can be classified in three different groups: Content-based, Collaborative Filtering and Hybrids.

  • Content-based systems These are built on the knowledge the system has about the items already selected or considered (looked at by the user), in order to provide suggestions about other items similar to those the user examined. This type of recommendation system focuses on the items themselves, relying on their characteristics and recommending other items with similar attributes or metainformation. Content-based recommendations are very powerful since minimum product information is needed for them to operate.
  • Collaborative filtering systems Recommendation systems based on collaborative filtering are based on the detection of users that are similar to the active user (in order to recommend items already rated by those similar users but not by the active user). In other words, they answer the query, “Show me information that other people similar to me have been interested in.”  This approach assumes that users with similar profiles will tend to perform comparable actions on a set of same (or nearly identical) items. These systems use the information gathered from past user interactions with the system (either implicitly or explicitly, for example, visit or view details) so as to suggest items which will presumably be of interest for the user. The main advantage of this approach is that it does not require any information about users or items in advance, making it appropriate in many situations.
  • Hybrid recommendation systems are essentially combinations of the previous two approaches. For example, they can use collaborative filtering and content-based information together to suggest a broader range of items accurately. The complexity of these hybrid systems tends to make them more expensive for the content producer to implement.

We observe that, in an attempt to enrich the user experience of site visitors, more and more companies (and individual business units) across many different business areas — often in the R&D domain where collaboration between users, along with rapid access to relevant information — are starting to implement recommendation strategies. These companies recognize the potential of providing good suggestions and are making the investment necessary to bring that benefit to customers.

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Catching up with Radu Cioara of CCC’s Cluj Office https://www.copyright.com/blog/catching-up-with-radu-cioara-of-cccs-cluj-office/ Wed, 28 Apr 2021 08:05:23 +0000 https://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=31340 In our latest Q&A, we catch up with Radu Cioara, CCC’s Dev Ops tech lead in Cluj, Romania.

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In our latest Q&A, we catch up with Radu Cioara, CCC’s Dev Ops tech lead in Cluj, Romania.

DD: Hello, Radu, very nice to (virtually) meet you! Can you tell us a little bit about your professional background? I see you are somewhat of a Linux expert — It’s been decades since I did anything in a Unix way, and I expect that whole operating system (OS) family is vastly different now. What do you like about Linux? What is it the most useful OS for?

RC: Hey, David! My professional background with Linux started when I was just beginning high school. I was very fortunate to have some smart friends who had a little side business of reinstalling Windows and Linux on people’s computers, and they brought me along and taught me the process. That ignited the spark.  In University, I studied Electronics and Telecommunications. My first job was interning for Alcatel-Lucent, where I had to deploy and test custom telecommunications software on Linux machines.

My Unix/Linux experience broadened when I joined Atos, a huge, global IT services provider.  There I got the chance to play around with AIX (a Unix flavor from IBM) and with a lot of Red Hat while working within a very competitive team. I was very fortunate to see a lot of data-center management on location in other countries, including in Germany and The Netherlands. The most recent chapter in my life with Linux is with CCC and, oh boy, is it a journey! I have the pleasure of working with the best teams in the company and also of learning the joys of working hands-on in a cloud implementation.

What does your role as Dev Ops Tech Lead entail? First, though, for those of our readers who may not know, what is Dev Ops?

RC: DevOps is, basically, a software development strategy which bridges the gap between the developers and the IT staff. It overcomes all the limitations of the traditional waterfall model. The DevOps process involves continuous integration and continuous deployment. To put this in simpler terms, DevOps is a, in origin, a hybrid between Development and Operations. But each shop has a different interpretation of this – in other words, some groups are more focused on the operations side and some on the coding or development side.

As a DevOps Tech Lead, in coordination with my manager and (of course) other stakeholders, I am responsible for what my team in Romania is doing on CCC’s infrastructure. I also train new team members in the Cluj office for the systems side of the house. I have the opportunity to work on new projects that may or may not end up in production — this involves some research and a lot of hands-on practice to get a feel for the new products that we are interested in.

What is your overall experience of working for CCC in Cluj?

RC: I’ve had a great experience working for CCC in Cluj. I am pretty proud to be the first employee that CCC hired directly when it was still Ixxus. The community is pretty tight – we often go out for drinks after work and swap stories — or at least we used to before the pandemic. We still manage to do those things virtually over Zoom.

CCC is now a global company, with offices in several regions around the world. What do you find works best for you towards keeping in sync with your colleagues in other — sometimes quite distant — offices?

RC: I find regular meetings and updates keep us in sync no matter the distance or time zone. Also, having a clear goal motivates and focuses teams together to achieve what is needed. Having a joyful attitude helps too — trying to make others’ day a good one usually boosts morale, especially in these times. Pro Tip: Knowing a few words in each office’s language unites the teams in my opinion.

If you had one thing to share with a prospective employee, to encourage them to come work with CCC at the Cluj Office — or anywhere — what would that be?

RC: “Come work with us; we have cookies!”  More seriously, the company is very respectful toward its employees, each office has a great environment, and there is always something cool to work on so boredom is out of the question.

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It’s All About the Licensing https://www.copyright.com/blog/its-all-about-the-licensing/ Mon, 26 Apr 2021 13:10:35 +0000 https://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=31330 Today, in a world of smartphones and tablets, publishing – as practiced by authors, publishers and booksellers – is all about licensing. The observation is a timely one on World Intellectual Property (IP) Day.

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If you think you understand publishing, then Lois Wasoff has written an essay for you in a new e-book available from Copyright Clearance Center.

In “Publishing as Embodiment of Licensing,” the long-time publishing industry lawyer has reappraised the legal basis of the business in terms of screens not pages. The observation is a timely one today, World Intellectual Property (IP) Day, as marked by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).

Once upon a time, publishing was all about printing and distributing books and journals. Today, in a world of smartphones and tablets, publishing – as practiced by authors, publishers and booksellers – is all about licensing.

It’s All About the Licensing

“Historically, written works reached their readers through the sale of physical copies. Licenses were, for that reason, primarily a tool that authors and publishers used to define their relationships with each other. Copyright law, not license terms, defined the rights and privileges of most readers,” Wasoff explains.

“Digital distribution has dramatically changed that paradigm,” she continues. “Licenses now increasingly define the relationships between authors and publishers on the one hand and their customers on the other.”

Wasoff’s essay is one-third of Creating Solutions Together: Lessons to Inform the Future of Collective Licensing. The free publication from CCC looks at a quarter century of development in collective licensing for text publishing. CCC commissioned the volume in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the final appellate decision in the case of American Geophysical Union et al. v. Texaco Inc.

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Facing S&S Staff Criticism, Pence Book Moves Forward https://www.copyright.com/blog/facing-ss-staff-criticism-pence-book-moves-forward/ Fri, 23 Apr 2021 13:09:04 +0000 https://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=31324 Decisions to cancel one book and to advance plans for publishing another highlight pressure on publishers to reconcile business plans with social concerns.

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Friday, April 23, is World Book & Copyright Day 2021. The date is chosen for its significance as the anniversary of the death in 1616 of both William Shakespeare and Miguel de Cervantes.

UNESCO as well as national and international organizations representing publishers, booksellers and libraries, plan to mark the day by celebrating the pleasure of reading and by encouraging respect for authors and creators whose works contribute to progress in science and the arts.

At Simon & Schuster, recent decisions to cancel one book and to advance plans for publishing another highlight pressure on publishers to reconcile business plans with social concerns, reports Andrew AlbanesePublishers Weekly senior writer.

Facing S&S Staff Criticism, Pence Book Moves Forward

Earlier this month, S&S staff members began calling for the publisher to cancel its deal to buy former Vice President Mike Pence’s memoir, as well as to drop Post Hill Press as a distribution client after it signed a book deal with Jonathan Mattingly, one of the police officers who fired shots that killed Breona Taylor in March 2020.Bottom of Form Last week, S&S said it would not distribute The Fight for Truth: The Inside Story Behind the Breonna Taylor Tragedy.

This week, S&S CEO Jonathan Karp released two letters to staff defending his decisions to stick with the Pence book and with Post Hill Press.

“I’m happy that today’s publishing employees are coming together like this to press their leadership. You want your employees invested in their work, right? With so much at stake in terms of people’s lives and basic fairness in our society, some may see this as controversy, but I see this as progress,” Albanese comments.

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