Blog – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com Rights Licensing Expert Mon, 24 Apr 2017 15:33:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.copyright.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/cropped-ccc-favicon-32x32.png Blog – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com 32 32 Sustainable Growth in Open Access: Institutional Demands http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/sustainable-growth-open-access-institutional-demands/ http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/sustainable-growth-open-access-institutional-demands/#respond Thu, 20 Apr 2017 08:00:59 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=12563 Inefficient workflows on the side of both publishers and libraries are significantly constraining further growth in open access.

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Publishers must be prepared to meet the growing demand for data from institutions and funders. The OpenAPC initiative grew out of a local requirement at Bielefeld University, Germany, to efficiently report APC spending to the German Research Foundation.  As Dirk Pieper, deputy director of Bielefeld University Library, explains: “After publishing our APC cost and bibliographic as open data, the logical next step was to open this up for other institutions.” Today, OpenAPC captures over €43m in publication fee spending from 71 research performing institutions and research funders in Europe and North America. Pieper believes the size of the dataset helps libraries drive price and cost transparency in the developing open access market.

Views differ on the rate at which open access will grow, but no-one doubts that it is here to stay. What is clear is that the switch to open access business models cannot be made overnight.

Yet libraries’ growing appetite for transparent data increases the expectations placed on publishers. “One trend that we’re really noticing is institutions wanting great reporting on their open access publication, and seeing that as part of a service that they would like publishers to provide,” says Springer Nature’s Pyne. Meeting this requirement can involve significant investment in metadata and workflows, but Pyne believes it is a price worth paying: “Investing in metadata early on pays off in terms of being able to set up open access arrangements much faster and more flexibly.”

Taking a data-driven approach

Without good systems, APC pricing can become a black box, with a high risk of error and dissatisfied customers. While some publishers choose to develop in-house solutions, others are partnering with third-party vendors to develop data-driven workflows. Manuscript submission systems like Clarivate Analytics’ ScholarOne and Aries Editorial Manager are evolving to capture crucial metadata at the point of submission. Standards like ORCID, Ringgold, and the Crossref Funder Registry enable the data collected to be easily consumed by other systems. One example is Delta Think’s Open Access Data Analytics Tool, which provides insights through aggregated and curated data and analysis to support strategic decisions. Another is Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink suite of e-commerce and workflow tools which can use this information to drive author-, institution- and funder-centric payment workflows, and provide post-transaction reporting on pricing and discounts.  By leveraging these partnerships, publishers of all sizes can implement a scalable solution to support their internal needs, as well as those of their customers.

Hiding the wiring

Until data-driven approaches become the norm, there remains too much reliance on authors to navigate complex payment processes.  Indeed, Bielefeld’s Pieper argues that inefficient workflows on the side of both publishers and libraries are significantly constraining further growth in open access. He expects European libraries to offer an “open access clearing centre” in future, managing payment and bibliographical services on behalf of their authors.

Pyne also sees scope to streamline the relationship between publishers and institutions, and improve the author experience. She notes, however, that this cannot be achieved at the expense of transparency, and that not every institution has similar requirements.  Retaining the flexibility to meet the needs of individual authors is crucial.

Looking to the future

Views differ on the rate at which open access will grow, but no-one doubts that it is here to stay. What is clear is that the switch to open access business models cannot be made overnight. Publishers need to develop a sound understanding of the OA market, implement transparent and sustainable pricing strategies, and adopt data-driven workflows, all of which takes time. Pieper, however, points to the growth in pirate websites such as Sci-Hub as a harbinger of more rapid change. “In Germany, we are currently learning that research does not stop if we lose access to research articles,” he says, “The only thing which happens is that Sci-Hub becomes even more popular. If traditional publishers want to earn money from publishing in the future, they must hurry.”

For more on this topic, read Rob Johnson’s post Sustainable Growth in Open Access: Finding a Viable Business Model.

Originally published in The Bookseller, March 20, 2017.

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What is Text Mining? And How is it Different from a Web Search? http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/text-mining-different-web-search/ http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/text-mining-different-web-search/#respond Wed, 19 Apr 2017 08:01:46 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=12508 If you’re ready to beef up your text mining knowledge, here’s your crash course in the basics.

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If you find text mining to be a confusing concept, you’re not alone. The process of deriving high-quality information from text materials using software requires background knowledge before you can fully grasp how it works, and how it can benefit your team’s research and discovery efforts.

If you’re ready to beef up your text mining knowledge, here’s your crash course in the basics:

First, the definition: What is text mining?

Text mining is a process that derives high-quality information from text materials using software. It is used to extract assertions, facts and relationships from unstructured text (e.g., scholarly articles, internal documents, and more), and identify patterns or relations between items that would otherwise be difficult to discern.

Text analytics and semantic search are two concepts that are closely related to text mining.

Why? Text mining enables R&D teams to systematically and efficiently examine content to answer questions that ultimately guide business decisions and resource investments. The alternative would be to curate thousands of pieces of content (or more) manually. At today’s fast pace, this is unfeasible, unrealistic, and error-prone.

How? Text mining tools employ sophisticated software which uses natural language processing (NLP) algorithms to read and analyze text. There are two basic steps:

  1. The first step is identifying the entities an organization is interested in. In a biomedical setting, these might include genes, cell lines, proteins, small molecules, cellular processes, drugs, or diseases.
  2. The next step is analyzing sentences in which those key entities appear, to determine how they are related. A relationship is a connection between at least two named entities; for example, that gene BCL-2 is an independent predictor of breast cancer.

Text mining can uncover relationships that might not have been found otherwise, unlocking previously hidden information to help researchers:

  • Identify and develop new hypotheses
  • Attain knowledge and improve understanding
  • Discover links between diseases and existing drugs to find new therapeutic uses
  • Detect potential safety issues early

The results of these types of projects can provide a greater understanding of the underlying biology behind specific diseases, show how they respond to certain drugs and support the target discovery process.

What Format Is Used in Text Mining Software?

XML is the preferred format used in text mining software. XML is a markup language used to encode documents in a format that is easily read by computers. It is used widely for encoding documents so that computer programs can parse or display the content appropriately.

How Does Text Mining Differ from a Web Search?

Typical web searches may seem like the process of text mining, but there are stark differences. Search is the retrieval of documents or other results based on certain search terms. Search engines such as Google, Yahoo or Bing are commonly used to conduct these types of searches, and your organization may also use an enterprise search solution. The output is typically a hyperlink to text/ information residing elsewhere, along with a small amount of text that describes what is found at the other end of the link. The purpose is to find the entire existing work so that its content can be used.

In text mining, the researcher looks to analyze text. The goal is to extract useful information, not solely to find, link to, and retrieve documents that contain specific facts. Unlike with search, the output of text mining varies depending on how the researcher wishes to apply the results.

Search functionality helps users find the specific document(s) they are looking for, where text mining goes well beyond search, to find particular facts and assertions in the literature in order to derive new value.

Ready to learn more? Download Turning Text into Insight: Text Mining in the Life Sciences

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Gottlieb: Is the FDA in Safe Hands? http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/gottlieb-fda-in-safe-hands/ http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/gottlieb-fda-in-safe-hands/#respond Tue, 18 Apr 2017 07:06:02 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=12604 President Trump’s choice of Scott Gottlieb to head up the FDA appears to be well received within the industry. Here's what his leadership could look like.

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Not one to mince his words, President Donald Trump has made repeated attacks on the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) approval process. Although many within the pharma industry would welcome less regulatory red tape, most draw a line at axing the rules completely. Which is why Trump’s choice of Scott Gottlieb to head up the FDA appears to be so well received within the industry.

Who is Scott Gottlieb?

Dr. Gottlieb is a medical school professor and cancer survivor with a background working with pharma companies. Gottlieb gained experience in several senior positions at the FDA during the George W. Bush administration. He’s an industry insider, and for many that means he’s a safer pair of hands than other nominees.

However, his deep-rooted links to pharma span more than a decade – and that may work against him. Described by Public Citizen as an “unprecedented web of big pharma ties,” those links run far and wide. His work as a consultant and speaker earned him hundreds of thousands of dollars from medical-product companies, and he is a venture partner at a company that funds multiple firms working in the biopharmaceutical and medical device sectors.

Gottlieb is vocal about his views of the FDA, calling for faster approvals, more transparency, and greater decision-making power for doctors. In a 2012 article for National Affairs, Gottlieb describe the FDA’s drug approval process as “cumbersome.” This is an opinion that has been echoed by Trump, who has also described the agency as “slow and burdensome.”

Yet, according to many independent researchers, the FDA is the fastest regulatory agency in the world. Researchers say the reason endless medical breakthroughs aren’t coming to market is because discovering them takes a huge amount of time and effort.

What would Gottlieb’s FDA leadership look like?

With Gottlieb as commissioner of the FDA, we could see the faster, more flexible approach to evidence. This approach is already in effect within the agency’s cancer division. If it was to be adopted across the agency as a whole, it could mean more application approvals and doctors taking on the role of gatekeepers. But speedier approval doesn’t necessarily translate into better outcomes.

In the National Affairs article, Gottlieb wrote the “FDA is driven by a profound lack of confidence in the ability of doctors to make careful judgments. The agency regulates drug makers, but it does not regulate doctors.”

However, putting more power in the hands of doctors might not be the most strategic move. Expecting doctors to vet the data on drugs to ensure their safety and value to patients is largely unrealistic. The vetting process takes time and transferring responsibility would place a huge burden on doctors.

Gottlieb also believes by modernizing the agency’s approval process, the cost of prescription drugs could be driven down. This, in theory, could end the tendency for drug prices to stay at the same level long after their patents have expired.

The concerns around Gottlieb

Gottlieb might be the first choice for many in biopharma, but outside the industry people are yet to be convinced. Speaking about Gottlieb’s appointment, Michael Carome, director of Public Citizen’s Health Research Group said, “In addition to being entangled with multiple industry ties, he’s advocated for a dangerous deregulatory approach to the review of medications.”

US Democrats have also voiced concerns. Sherrod Brown, Senator for Ohio argues the FDA needs a leader who won’t “roll over for his big pharma friends.”

The main concern is Gottlieb’s appointment serves the interests of the industry, not those of the patients. On the flip side, his FDA experience and medical background have worked in his favor. Founder and chair of Friends of Cancer Research Ellen Sigal said he has “the skills necessary to continue to lead the FDA to be patient-centered and science-focused.”

Or, in the words of Paul Howard, a senior fellow with the conservative Manhattan Institute: “He has led investments in new medicines and in new approaches in therapeutics. It’s extraordinarily helpful for someone who is leading the agency at a time of tremendous technological change to have that kind of vision and experience.”

Gottlieb might come to the role with more financial conflicts of interest than seen in previous commissioners, but his supporters are adamant he’s the right person for the job.

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Celebrating Science: CCC to Attend March for Science in D.C. and Boston http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/ccc-attend-march-for-science-dc-boston/ http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/ccc-attend-march-for-science-dc-boston/#respond Fri, 14 Apr 2017 08:30:45 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=12535 CCC to participate in March for Science in Washington, D.C. and Boston to celebrate science and the essential role it plays in our everyday lives.

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The March for Science, planned for Earth Day, April 22, promises to be an unprecedented series of events—gathering scientists and science-minded citizens from around the world to promote and embrace scientific research and discovery.

CCC is proud to announce that we’ll be there in Washington, D.C. and in Boston to support the primary mission of the March: celebrating science and the essential role it plays in our everyday lives. We’ll be joining several of our partners—including AAAS and the NY Academy of Sciences—to support a message of inclusiveness and diversity that embraces the role of empirical evidence in seeking answers for the benefit of the public good.

I recently sat down with several leading scientific publishing experts at the London Book Fair to discuss the challenges that modern researchers face.  As the amount of data and content required by scientists proliferates exponentially, how can we streamline the processes for accessing it in a way that creates more collaboration and improves decision making? At CCC, we’ve been fortunate to work closely with the scientific community to help researchers overcome one of the biggest obstacles in the discovery process: navigating the content and data challenges that hinder research.

Whether it’s accelerating R&D for the next wonder drug, or funding a cure for cancer, the research communities that power these breakthroughs need quick access to data. Putting more data into the hands of the scientists who know what to do with it will unlock greater innovation and advancement in solving some of the biggest issues we face today.

CCC is proud to participate in the March for Science to ensure researchers and the scientific community have the content they need today to power discovery tomorrow.

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Sustainable Growth in Open Access: Finding a Viable Business Model http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/sustainable-growth-open-access-finding-viable-business-model/ http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/sustainable-growth-open-access-finding-viable-business-model/#respond Thu, 13 Apr 2017 17:43:17 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=12558 Publishers developing an open access offer need both to set headline APC prices, and consider what discounts to offer.

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It’s often said that change creates opportunity, and there’s no doubt that open access (OA) represents a major change for scholarly publishers. However, pinpointing the opportunities it creates is harder than it first appears. “A factor that I think is limiting open access’s continued growth is the lack of clean, clear, collected data,” explains Deni Auclair, chief financial officer and senior analyst at Delta Think, a consulting and advisory firm focused on scholarly communications. She estimates that the OA market is growing at 10-15% a year, and represents somewhere between 3 and 6% of the total academic journals market—but actionable data for individual players often remains elusive. The big publishers have research groups of two or three people working solely on the open access market, notes Auclair.

“A factor that I think is limiting open access’s continued growth is the lack of clean, clear, collected data.Deni Auclair, Delta Think

Small wonder, then, that others may struggle to identify and carve out a niche. Auclair therefore advises publishers to look carefully at the actions of competitors, seek external advice, and take account of macro-level trends: “To make really strong, strategic decisions, you have to understand the dynamics of the entire marketplace.”

Finding a viable business model

Where an opportunity is identified, the next challenge is finding a viable business model. “There’s still a lot of experimentation, innovation and trying to figure out how to make this work for everybody. And we’re not there yet,” says Auclair. Article publication charges (APCs) have become the favoured business model for open access journals, but demand from authors remains muted in many disciplines, and funders are keen to keep prices low. As a result, the majority of subscription publishers are still taking a conservative approach to adoption of OA models. “A lot of publishers are paying lip service to open access,” says Auclair, “but what’s really needed is a process-driven approach.”

Setting a price point

Publishers developing an open access offer need both to set headline APC prices, and consider what discounts to offer. These might be based on author memberships, national or institutional affiliations, offsetting arrangements or a whole range of other factors. Meanwhile, there are growing concerns that open access could simply replace financial barriers to readership with similar barriers to publication, particularly for authors in the developing world. Ros Pyne, head of policy and development, Open Research at Springer Nature, stresses, “If you’re thinking about scaling up OA, especially in the fully-OA sphere, then you have to spend some time thinking about what your approach to waiving and discounts would be.” Factor in the need to support some commissioned content, which may not be revenue-generating, and the process of setting and charging APCs quickly becomes complex.

Originally published in The Bookseller, March 20, 2017

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Using Music at Work – 5 Source and Licensing Considerations http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/music-licensing-source-considerations/ http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/music-licensing-source-considerations/#respond Wed, 12 Apr 2017 08:00:18 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=12527 When work projects require music licensing, you have several different options. Here's a look at five different paths you can take.

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Every creative video marketer must go into a new project with a vision. A color pallet. A mood to portray. A sound that sets the tone.

When it comes to selecting the music for a video project or presentation, creativity can sometimes take a back seat to real-world logistics. Where will we find music? How do we obtain it? How much will it cost? Are there licensing risks associated with it?

Here’s a look at five different paths you can take for music licensing, and the pros and cons associated with each:

1. Use existing popular music.

By popular music, we mean music that’s been on the radio and is well-known. To get the sync license, which provides permission for use of the song, you would contact and negotiate directly with the music publisher or song copyright owner. This type of license is required to set music to visual works such as movies, YouTube videos and even PowerPoint presentations. To get the master use license (provides permission for use of the sound recording), you’d contact and negotiate directly with the record label.

The Pros: Whether it’s music from today or music from the ’50s, the benefits to using this type of music are obvious.  It’s immediately recognizable and can quickly convey the mood or the era to your audience.

The Cons: This is the most difficult to obtain.  Unfortunately, very often, you won’t even get a response to your license request.  The price tag tends to be in the tens of thousands of dollars, depending on the popularity of the song you want to use and the way in which you want to use it.

2. Use production company music

Production companies offer one-stop shopping where you can get both the sync license and the master use license.

The Pros: Production company music is very easy to obtain. Because production music companies are in the business of music licensing, they make the process very easy, through websites where users can preview, pay for and immediately download the music.

The cost can be as low as $30 for some production music.  It’s usually less than $1,000 – in most instances, significantly less than $1,000.

The Cons: Some production music companies might have limitations to their licenses. For example, some don’t allow you to use the music in a political advertisement.  The downside here is while production music may be very good, it’s probably not immediately recognizable music.

3. Try music by an independent artist

By independent artist, we mean a musician whose music isn’t distributed by a major music company, so not as well-known. 

The Pros: This music is going to be less expensive than popular music but probably a little more expensive than production music. Depending on the musician’s fan base, it might be recognizable to a niche audience.

The Cons: A potential risk comes with indie musician groups who produce and perform original music but might not be diligent or have fewer resources when it comes to documenting the ownership of the music they create.

4. Find Music Under a Creative Commons License

Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that provides free license terms and conditions for use by copyright owners who want to make their creative work more available for use under uniform, relatively relaxed terms without getting into complex negotiations.

The Pros: These licenses allow the material to be used without the payment of any fees.

The Cons: There are different variations on Creative Commons licenses.  Some don’t allow commercial use.  It may be risky to use material licensed under Creative Commons licenses because the licensor offers no assurances (in the form of representations, warranties or indemnities) regarding the work.  Therefore, any use is at the user’s risk.

5. Commission Original Music

Commissioning original music comes with several different variables–  the cost will depend on the commercial stature of the musician writing the commissioned music for you. Some production houses will connect you with musicians who can compose and record original music for you.

The Pros: It’s one of a kind, and therefore can be tailored to the company’s needs. And if you have a well-drafted agreement for your acquisition of the original music, there should be minimal risk.

The Cons: It can be a lengthier acquisition process, since you need to take the time to find the musician, wait for the music to be written and to be recorded.  And of course, it is still necessary to negotiate an individual agreement for the work.

Interested in learning more about music licensing at work? Listen now to CCC’s on demand webinar with Joy Butler: “Using Music at Work: Balancing Creativity and Compliance.”

Make music licensing simple: Explore RightFind® Music 

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Benefits of Focusing on Patient-Centered Outcomes http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/benefits-patient-centered-outcomes/ http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/benefits-patient-centered-outcomes/#respond Tue, 11 Apr 2017 08:00:30 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=12463 The clinical trial process needs to evolve – and for that the focus needs to be more on the patient and less on the disease.

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Patients are central to healthcare, but when it comes to medical research, the patient experience has not always been a main priority. Traditionally, we have seen a focus on disease-centric outcomes or survival outcomes as measures for success, but these approaches have their drawbacks.

Many patients are skeptical about clinical trials, fearing the safety, severity, efficacy, placebo and side effects of the treatments offered. That’s because patients face the unenviable task of finding the right balance between the effectiveness and toxicity of a drug.  Physicians might be tasked with finding the right dosage, but patients are the ones who experience the effects of finding the right dosage.

The pharma industry has to find new ways to respond to patients who are increasingly self-educated and engaged.

Education around medicine is not always intuitive, and the result, per a survey by the National Consumers League, is that nearly three out of four Americans admit taking prescription drugs incorrectly.

Voicing her concerns on the matter in an article on PharmaVoice.com, Vera Rulon, director of external medical communications at Pfizer, said: “Often, new products are created or healthcare delivery process changes without incorporating patient input. This can lead to a solution that is not helpful to patients.”

How pharma (and regulators) are becoming more patient-focused

Fortunately, the situation is changing. According to the Patient Engagement Solutions Market report, the global patient engagement market is expected to reach $16.39 billion by 2020.

This is being spurred on by one of the biggest trends in the industry: the search for value within medicines. In this context, value is defined as outcomes achieved per dollar spent. But the question increasingly being asked is value for whom? The answer is almost always the patient, and thus we are seeing patient-centered care and outcomes taking center stage in conversations about quality and value.

The pharma industry is adapting and exploring ways to respond to patients who are increasingly engaged and self-educated. In order to meet patient expectations, pharma companies are promoting their websites as destinations for patient-focused information. They are making better use of social media as a way to engage with patients. The industry is also recognizing the role technology can play in supporting and engaging patients during the clinical trial process.

Continuing this trend, the European Commission is working towards making clinical trial results more accessible to patients. Lay summaries are becoming more patient-friendly, explaining complex scientific data and concepts in simple language.

Will a new approach alleviate patient skepticism?

When pharmaceutical companies understand patient’s experiences at the research phase, they’re better able to inform patients future choices. This means patients can be more actively involved in their treatments, and thus help boost their own outcomes. From knowing what to expect based on their personal characteristics to understanding how they can improve their own outcomes, focusing research in this way gives patients a voice. The more patients understand about clinical trials, the more trust they will have in them – and the better those trials will be.

Ultimately, the goal of patient-centered outcomes is genuine transparency between the industry, patients and society. In turn, this will help shape more effective and engaging medical communications for the future.

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The Road to Digital Transformation at London Book Fair 2017 http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/road-digital-transformation-london-book-fair-2017/ http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/road-digital-transformation-london-book-fair-2017/#respond Thu, 06 Apr 2017 13:54:32 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=12456 By 2020, 3 out of 4 businesses will undergo digital business transformations, but only 30% will prove successful.

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This year’s London Book Fair (March 13-16, 2017) included its trademark spirited discussions, and CCC was proud to join some of the most influential professionals in the industry in conversation. London Book Fair stands out as one of the most important content marketplace events in the world, which is why CCC continues to collaborate with them through sponsorship, panel moderation and speaking roles. Catch up on the four engaging and informative CCC- led panel discussions at the Fair now with the video or reading the transcript from each panel. The other panels are:

“This is not them and us. It’s not authors, researchers, librarians, publishers. We are in a continuum. And the only way we can get sensible evolution is if we evolve together at the same rate to solve the right problems.”–David Worlock

Watch it now: Checking-In on the Road to Digital Transformation

Heading down the road to digital transformation can feel like travelling without a guide or a map.  For a fix on the publishing industry’s latest digital transformation location, hear a panel of analysts and executives review the findings of a groundbreaking survey of leading publishers in the UK and around the world.  How far have we come? Is this a race? Who’s ahead? Will the journey ever end?”

Learn more about the panel participants:

Max Gabriel joined Taylor & Francis Group as Chief Technology Officer in 2015. In this role, he is responsible for technology strategy, delivery and operations for the group. Prior to joining Taylor & Francis, Max was CTO of Pearson India and Africa where he was responsible for digital transformation of these markets and successfully launched Pearson’s first tablet based learning product in India. Before joining Pearson, Max held senior technology leadership roles at Global Industry leaders such as Diageo, Pfizer, and JP Morgan Chase. Max actively mentors and advises several tech startups in the media and education domain.

Valentina Kalk is the director of the Brookings Institution Press. Based in Washington and founded in 1916, the Brookings Institution is a nonprofit public policy organization whose research focuses on governance, foreign policy, economics, development and metropolitan studies. Before joining Brookings, Valentina was head of United Nations Publications, where she led the digital transition of the UN’s publishing operations. Prior to moving to the UN, Valentina was managing rights and digital development for World Bank Publications. A philologist by background, Valentina moved from Italy to the United States in 1999.

David Worlock has over thirty years of experience as a Digital Strategist and Advisor in publishing. In 1985, David founded Electronic Publishing Services Ltd. (EPS), a research and consultancy company working with the digital content industry in developing strategies for products and markets in consumer and business sectors. Outsell, Inc acquired EPS in 2006. David chairs Outsell’s Leadership Councils, a member-service for over 150 CEOs and senior executives of media publishing and information-provider companies in the USA and Europe. Also, David is Senior Advisor at Quayle Munro, the independent mergers and acquisitions advisory firm, and a board member at Map of Agriculture, a big data start-up in agribusiness.

To read the transcript of the panel discussion, click here.

*via our subsidiary, Ixxus.

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Looking for Competitive Advantage? Talk to Your Information Manager http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/looking-competitive-advantage-talk-information-manager/ http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/looking-competitive-advantage-talk-information-manager/#respond Wed, 05 Apr 2017 08:00:01 +0000 http://www.dev1.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=11003 Three ways an information manager can provide information that leads to overall company competitive advantages.

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Most companies face stiff competition in the global marketplace. Because organizational leaders are hyper-aware of their competitive position, they’ll readily consume information that gives them insight into their organization’s market.

What most companies don’t realize is that a wealth of information can be provided by someone they already employ: the organization’s information manager.

Content boundaries are not absolute, and if a content purchase can also be used to provide valuable new understanding outside of its original purpose it becomes more important. Being able to both point this out to budget decision makers and to potentially find and create new content advocates in diverse parts of the organization is an excellent way to defend the content investment.

An information manager’s duty is to make sure the company’s content strategy and portfolio provides the necessary information support for the company to operate. When an information manager begins to analyze content usage and performance, the benefit is two-fold: for the company, content investments become more strategic, and for the information manager, securing appropriate funding and budget becomes far easier.

The following are three ways an information manager can provide information that leads to overall company competitive advantages:

Step One: Align content position with market position

A company’s organizational structure often reflects the way it positions itself in the market. Divisions within the organization may be devoted to a specific geography, market space or customer base. If the company is public, these segments will often report out on their individual financial performance and how that performance relates to the overall revenue generation of the organization.

It is important for the information manager to understand not only where revenue is generated in the organization, but also to be able to communicate and track how the content portfolio supports these segments.

Example: If a company reports out on four segments, and two of those segments generate more than 80% of the company’s revenue, the information organization should make sure its own spend is focused most on the content that supports the information needs of the two highest revenue generating segments.

Step Two: Explore new ways of using content

Often, information is purchased in subject areas to support specific market, business or research needs. It may be technical engineering content, medical literature, patent data, merger and acquisition information, etc. This information becomes valuable because of its subject specificity and breadth of content in spaces that are critical for the organization’s competitive position.

Frequently the initial investment for the content is based on just such a targeted need.  But content boundaries are not absolute, and if a content purchase can also be used to provide valuable new understanding outside of its original purpose it becomes more important. Being able to both point this out to budget decision makers and to potentially find and create new content advocates in diverse parts of the organization is an excellent way to defend the content investment.

Tracking the use of critical sources can show how content investments can be leveraged for more than their original purpose. Monitoring the use of sources by different groups for increases in access, as well as reaching out to new groups to build new stakeholder advocacy, can help secure the ongoing investment in content that meets such a diverse set of needs.

Step Three: Track information seeking trends through content use

Information managers also have the unique ability to provide information about the organization itself. Once content usage tracking is in place, identifying trends in the company’s content seeking behavior can provide interesting insights on the issues which are currently important to the company and where the company might be heading.

One way to look at trends in information seeking behavior is to analyze new topic areas that are being researched.

Example: Researchers who explore new ideas need to read and gain background in those spaces. They may often need to request articles from unfamiliar journals, seek thesis publications or look to monographic literature. If journal content in a new subject space begins to be accessed frequently and broadly, it may signal the need to reposition the portfolio to support an emerging information need.

Ready to learn more? Download 3 Approaches to Justify Your Content Spend for steps to create a strong case for content investment.

The post Looking for Competitive Advantage? Talk to Your Information Manager appeared first on Copyright Clearance Center.

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Do Your Employees Understand Your Company’s Copyright Policies? (Most Don’t) http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/employees-understand-companys-copyright-policies-dont/ http://www.copyright.com/velocity-of-content/employees-understand-companys-copyright-policies-dont/#respond Tue, 04 Apr 2017 10:00:28 +0000 http://www.dev1.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=10998 Most employees agree copyright law is important – but understanding their company’s copyright policy is their main challenge.

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Think about your company’s intellectual property: the patents, the trademarks, the creative materials produced by your employees or contractors and protected by copyright. Ask any of your colleagues about the importance of protecting these assets, and you’re likely to hear a unanimous response: it’s important.

When you consider that 36% of the content that’s shared is externally sourced, that’s about 17 potential instances of unlicensed sharing by employees per week.

Now ask the same question regarding the protection of external information or someone else’s intellectual property. Research and advisory firm Outsell, Inc.’s 2016 Information Seeking, Consumption and Use Report suggests a large difference in both awareness and consideration of copyright for information coming from external sources.

Here’s a look at the stats:

  1. 94% of respondents believe it is important to protect their own organization’s intellectual property.
  2. 64% of respondents believe if they obtain free information on the web or in print, they are permitted to share it.
  3. 47% of individual contributors admit they don’t think about copyright issues before forwarding published information.

This isn’t to say that most people disregard the importance of copyright. In fact, 74% of respondents recognize there are serious risks and copyright implications associated with exchanging published information.

The problem, then, is in awareness. The study goes on to note that nearly a quarter of respondents report not knowing the specifics of their company’s copyright policy.

Remember the stat about respondents believing if they obtain free information on the web or in print, they are permitted to share? In most cases, they aren’t.  Without that awareness of the limitation on what they lawfully do, employees share content blindly, unaware they’re putting their organization in a potentially detrimental situation.

3 Quick Tips to Increase Copyright Awareness

  1. New employees need to be made aware of the company’s copyright policy and to receive ongoing reinforcement thereafter so information isn’t forgotten or outdated.
  2. Provide specific use cases. Training should include specific use cases, so employees understand the granular aspects of their company policy. Provide scenarios, such as: If your company has just been featured in an influential trade journal, can the article be copied and sent to a small group of coworkers? Or, if you have permission to use an entire article, can you extract one chart and put it in a presentation?
  3. Make it easy for employees to get answers. When employees don’t receive thorough training, they may not be sure who to turn to with copyright questions. Designate a copyright expert or department that can answer these questions, and make this service known to your entire organization.

Content sharing is vital for today’s R&D-intensive industries. In fact, survey respondents report sharing content an average 5.5 times per week with nine people. When you consider that 36% of the content that’s shared is externally sourced, that’s about 17 potential instances of unlicensed sharing by employees per week.

To educate yourself and your team about copyright, check out CCC’s copyright education resources.

For more information about the state of information sharing and consumption, check out our infographic: Content Sharing & Copyright in the Workplace

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