Publishers – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com Rights Licensing Expert Fri, 20 Apr 2018 20:37:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.copyright.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/cropped-ccc-favicon-32x32.png Publishers – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com 32 32 Collaboration & Community: The Transition to Open Access http://www.copyright.com/blog/collaboration-community-transition-open-access/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/collaboration-community-transition-open-access/#respond Thu, 19 Apr 2018 09:00:48 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16270 Copyright Clearance Center hosted an expert panel discussion, “Collaboration & Community: The Transition to Open Access,” at The London Book Fair, assessing the state of OA today.

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The UK is well above global averages of open access publishing, and is at the forefront of a significant global movement which is fundamentally changing the way that research is conceived, conducted, disseminated and rewarded,” noted a December 2017 report for the Universities UK Open Access Coordination Group. Responsibility for driving remarkable change across the scholarly publishing landscape is widely shared, yet the evolving relationship of publishers and institutional libraries is perhaps the most critical.

Copyright Clearance Center’s panel discussion, “Collaboration & Community: The Transition to Open Access,” at The London Book Fair on April 10, 2018 picked up on these themes. The panel, moderated by Copyright Clearance Center’s Christopher Kenneally, assessed the state of OA today and laid out a vision for a sustainable and integrated publishing workflow solution that minimizes costs, promotes transparency and supports a range of business models.

Panelists included: Sven Fund, Managing Director of Knowledge Unlatched; Chris Leonard, Head of Product at Emerald Publishing Group; Matthew Day, Head of Open and Data Publishing at Cambridge University Press; and Danny Kingsley, Deputy Director of Scholarly Communications and Research Services at Cambridge University Library.

Stream the video here.

Transcript Excerpt:
CCC’s Chris Kenneally Talks with CUP’s Matt Day About The State of OA Today 

KENNEALLY:  So from here, we’ll fast forward to 2018 and where we are today.  Quickly, what is your sense of the status of open access, and describe what you think is the image of open access.  As you imagined it in 1998, it was a movement to free all those texts.  How do you think people perceive open access in the publishing and in the research community today?

LEONARD:  So in those last 20 years, I’ve worked on both sides of the fence for open access publishers and also for traditional subscription publishers, so I have a fairly rounded view of it, I would say.  And in 1998, I thought by now over half of the world’s scientific research literature would be freely available through open access, and also that within the next five years, it would be 100%.  Now, the fact that we’re still quite a long way from that – so we’re talking 20 years, and I think that research article you mentioned said we’re at 24%.

KENNEALLY:  Around about 20 million, yeah, and 24%, right.

LEONARD:  So that’s fairly slow uptake, I think.  You would hope at some point it will hockey stick upwards.  But I think in order for that to happen, something fairly fundamental needs to alter.

KENNEALLY:  Well, that’s what we’re going to come back to you about, because in your role at Emerald, you’re looking at the future of open, and I want to hear more about that.  But, Matt Day, that’s also what you’re doing at Cambridge University Press.  And as you listened to what Danny had to say and what Chris had to say, how do you see the state of open access today yourself there?  It was a revolution, but today, it’s more of a question of mechanics.  I’ve heard it put in this way, that it’s gone from Woodstock to Wall Street, from a kind of revolutionary movement to one that’s very much business focused.  Would you agree?

DAY:  Yes.  I think the day-to-day realities of open access are very complicated at the moment. The day-to-day realities of open access are very complicated and more complicated than perhaps I certainly imagined in the early days of BioMed Central.  I would certainly echo Danny and Chris’s comments that there’s a – in the early days, it was seen very much as an ethical, a hearts and minds thing.  Helping people to understand what open access is I think is still an ongoing issue, particularly for Danny and us.  But the mechanics of it have become a much bigger part of certainly my life.  Making it work internally so that we do actually – are able to publish open access material that goes through the system properly.  And for us, I think diversity is a big theme for us.  We work with many different stakeholders.  They have different feelings.  Some of them embrace open access.  Some of them are more cautious.  Some people are outright hostile still, I think.

So working with these different stakeholder groups is complex, and it’s evolving, as well, so that makes planning for the future very difficult.  The landscape is changing greatly, I think, still.  It’s definitely not at kind of a status quo that’s going to continue, I think.  So that complexity and diversity I feel is a feature of today.

 

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Survey Says: Transition to Open Access Publishing Can’t Happen Fast Enough http://www.copyright.com/blog/survey-says-transition-to-open-access-publishing-cant-happen-fast-enough/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/survey-says-transition-to-open-access-publishing-cant-happen-fast-enough/#respond Thu, 12 Apr 2018 22:30:45 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16249 Most respondents to the Springer Nature survey said the move to all future scholarly articles being made accessible via open access was only just a matter of time, with two-thirds hopeful it could happen within 10 years.

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The European Commission sums up the positives of OA best: “Nowadays, it is widely recognized that making research results more accessible contributes to better and more efficient science, and to innovation in the public and private sectors.” But is the transition happening quickly enough?

Springer Nature recently surveyed 200 professional staff working in research institutions and libraries around the world to gauge their opinions on OA, including when they think it will become the dominant publishing model.

Inside the Results of Springer Nature’s OA survey

70 percent of the respondents agreed that all future research articles, scholarly books and research data should be accessible via OA, while almost all (91%) said ‘open access is the future of academic and scientific publishing.’

Reporting on the findings, Research Information noted that the outlook for an OA future differed among researchers and authors. In a 2017 survey of Springer Nature authors, 67% agreed that OA is the future, compared to the 91% of researchers in 2018.

Related Reading: Defining Open Access in 4 Minutes or Less

Most respondents said the move to all future scholarly articles being made accessible via open access was only just a matter of time, with two-thirds hopeful it could happen within 10 years. But, there’s a desire for the transition to happen quicker, with respondents showing a low level of satisfaction with the current speed of progress.

Respondents were asked to leave their comments at the end of the survey, in order to get a more detailed view of progress. It was identified that open science is on the agenda of many organizations and funders, acting as a key driver of open access. Meanwhile, research data sharing was found to be somewhat lacking in terms of policy and education.

Commenting on the findings, Carrie Calder, VP for Business Development and Policy, Open Research at Springer Nature, said it was apparent that while the benefits of OA are resonating, many researchers are still struggling to share data so that it is easy found and used by other.

She called the rise of open research “one of the major forces reshaping the way that researchers collaborate to advance discovery,” adding that open science “beckons with innumerable rewards.”

Ready to learn more about OA? Check out these resources:

 

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Join CCC at the STM U.S. Conference 2018 http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-stm-u-s-conference-2018/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-stm-u-s-conference-2018/#respond Thu, 05 Apr 2018 20:49:07 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16280 Join CCC and Ixxus in Philadelphia for the STM U.S. Conference 2018 from April 24-26, where publishers and other stakeholders gather to collaboratively answer the question, “What can we do better, together?”

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Join CCC and Ixxus in Philadelphia for the STM U.S. Conference 2018 from April 24-26, where publishers and other stakeholders gather to collaboratively answer the question, “What can we do better, together?”

Catch us at the following sessions:

The future of access, part 1: The platform play and seamless content syndication

April 25, 2018 at 3:15    
Moderated by Roger Schonfeld‪ (Ithaka S+R)‪
Participants: Gaby Appleton (Mendeley); Yann Mahé (MyScienceWork); Rob McGrath (Readcube); Roy Kaufman (Copyright Clearance Center)

The fate of the music business looms over STM publishers like darkening storm clouds. Content providers wonder who will be our Spotify? Where will users go to get a legal, seamless aggregated search and discovery experience and what sort of sustainable business models will emerge?

Mendeley and Readcube propose syndicating content and brokering institutional access directly in their researcher productivity tools and reporting usage back to publishers in support of existing business models (Distributed Usage Logging).   Search engines like Google Scholar & Dimensions are serving up content directly now, expanding on their traditional role of referring traffic to publishers – and using new services like MyScienceWork to fulfill a user’s requested article with legal, freely available versions online – even if the user doesn’t have access to the version of record.  What is the future of the publisher’s own platform in this scenario? How will these new efforts to create seamless access impact traditional aggregators like EBSCO, ProQuest, and the document delivery market (CCC)? And most importantly, how will libraries be brought along in all of this?

 

Round Table: How will STM Tech Trends 2022 affect YOUR business?

April 26, 2018 at 9:30
Moderated by Chris Kenneally, Copyright Clearance Center
Participants: IJsbrand Jan Aalbersberg (Elsevier); Gerry Grenier (IEEE); Phill Jones (Digital Science); Stacy Malyil (Wolters Kluwer)

In a round table discussion moderated by Chris Kenneally (CCC), 4 members of STM’s Future Lab Forum will express their views on how the Tech Trends of 2022 will start impacting our publishing business now. Come and listen to be prepared for the future.

 

More “must attend” session picks:

Interactive forum discussion: digital ethics and data literacy

April 26, 2018 at 11:00
Moderated by Kent Anderson (Redlink)
Participants: Susan E McGrego (Columbia Journalism School); Patrick Vinck (Harvard University)

Are algorithms and social media outsmarting us, surveilling us, feeding us fake facts and alternative news, defining our views and opinions? Kent Anderson (Redlink) will engage in an interactive discussion on stage with thought leaders in digital integrity on topics such as ethics of algorithms, data literacy, user interface design, technology deployments, and current practice and policies. A very interactive session – so we expect you and the rest of the audience to chip in.

The Future of Access, part 2: RA21, Resource access in the 21st century

April 26, 2018 at 3:45
Chaired by Julia Wallace (RA21) and Heather Flanagan (RA21)

RA21 is a joint project by STM and NISO to drastically improve access to content, especially for mobile and off campus use. Access to scholarly and academic content should be as easy as logging in on Facebook and Google (but with stronger support for user privacy).

In its first year, the RA21 project, in which over 50 organisations collaborate, gained enormous traction among libraries, vendors, federation operators, ID management organisations and of course publishers. The three co-chairs of the project, Chris Shillum (Elsevier), Ralph Youngen (ACS) and Meltem Dincer (Wiley) will update you on the initial results of the pilots in academic and corporate environments and discuss possibilities for applying this information to your services. This session includes an interactive panel on frequently asked questions.

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Is OER Sustainable? 3 Examples that Suggest “Yes” http://www.copyright.com/blog/oer-sustainable-3-examples-suggest-yes/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/oer-sustainable-3-examples-suggest-yes/#respond Wed, 04 Apr 2018 19:16:20 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16153 The migration of publishers and techies to OER organizations is one sign that the lines between OER and publisher programs are starting to blur.

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Aside from the words “free” and “openly licensed,” another word that often arises in discussions of open educational resources (OER) is “sustainability.” With a business model that largely relies on funding from foundations and governments, the question is often posed: Is OER’s model sustainable? After all, OER is free to use, but it certainly costs to develop it.

For those not familiar with the term, OER is educational content that, once developed, is released with an intellectual property license that allows for its free use and repurposing. Since the inception of OER nearly 20 years ago, open developers have created millions of resources including textbooks, courseware, supplemental materials, videos, assessments, and more for use in K-12 schools and post-secondary institutions in the U.S. and abroad.

For the most part, OER development has been underwritten by foundations and to a lesser degree, federal and state governments. While there have been some signs recently that foundation funding for OER is waning, some are still writing checks. Meanwhile, government funding is increasing. Last year, the Texas legislature approved a measure that provides $20 million for the Texas Education Agency to develop OER courses.

The most recent development related to government OER funding occurred in March 2018, when the U.S. Congress authorized a small, $5 million OER program that will fund competitive grants for universities to develop open textbooks. The “open textbook grant program,” which is tucked in the mammoth fiscal year 2018 federal omnibus spending bill, will be administered by the U.S. Department of Education.

Obviously, the OER business model is sustainable as long as foundations and governments are willing to keep funding flowing. But, are there alternatives?

Related Reading: With Flexibility, Publishers Can Turn the OER Boom To Their Advantage – Here’s How

Is the Service Model The Answer?

Funding from large foundations and governments highlights the fact that development of quality curricular resources cannot be done cheaply. The complexities of development require real professional talents and skills in instructional design, publishing, and an array of technologies. Not surprisingly, the staffs of several of the largest K-12 OER organizations have started to swell and are peppered with professionals who have extensive backgrounds in publishing, technology, assessment, and education. The migration of publishers and techies to OER organizations is one sign that the lines between OER and publisher programs are starting to blur.

Another more important sign is the services model that some OER developers have started to use. The concept is simple: develop programs schools can use and then sell professional development and technical services to support them. In many cases publishers include such services with their offerings. In the OER services model they are sold as add-ons.

For example, Open Up Resources – an OER organization funded by five foundations – has developed K-12 language arts and math curricula that are available for districts to download and use. But, in addition, Open Up offers support services such as professional development for teachers, enhanced print services and more. “Districts using our freely-licensed curriculum can channel their savings on content towards investments in professional development, instructional coaching, and other teaching and learning supports,” according to the organization’s website.

Great Minds also sells service supports. It offers free PDF versions of its popular K-12 Eureka Math program – a resource that was originally developed as EngageNY using federal Race to the Top funds. Great Minds offers an enhanced, interactive digital version of the program for $145 per license. This enhanced “Eureka Digital Suite” contains professional development modules and videos for teachers. Great Minds also sells print editions of its programs.

Enter Private Equity

A third example that should not be overlooked is Lumen Learning, an OER organization that has received foundation support. In 2015, Lumen created a buzz when it raised $2.5 million in private equity funding to grow its line of low-cost college courseware programs. Lumen sells an array of professional development and technical services to support its programs. The organization created more buzz last year when it announced a partnership with college bookstore behemoth Follett, which manages course materials delivery at more than 1,200 colleges and universities.

Readings of copyrighted, third-party materials such as literature selections and other canonical works are another product sold by some OER organizations. This type of product provides OER developers with a way to offer students access to authentic texts without having to place copyrighted work in the core, openly licensed curriculum.

Not surprisingly, for-profit-publishers are following suit with their own OER offerings and service models. Cengage, one of the largest for-profit publishers in the post-secondary space, recently unveiled “OpenNow,” which is an OER platform that can be customized with service options.

It is a stretch to think that the services model can underwrite all the development costs of OER. However, these three examples do show how OER publishing is becoming increasingly professionalized and that publishers of all types are looking for new models of sustainability.

Ready to learn more? Check out:

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Join Us at the 2018 London Book Fair http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-us-at-the-2018-london-book-fair/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-us-at-the-2018-london-book-fair/#respond Thu, 29 Mar 2018 15:22:03 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16070 From 10-12 April 2018, CCC and Ixxus will be premium partners, exhibitors and panel participants at the 2018 London Book Fair.

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From 10-12 April 2018, CCC and Ixxus will be premium partners, exhibitors and panel participants at the 2018 London Book Fair at the Olympia Conference Center in London. Any attendees can visit us at Stand #7C16, or follow the action on Twitter with #LBF18. On Monday, 9 April, CCC and Ixxus will host an invitation-only lunch with BookMachine and an evening networking reception with Byte the Book. Ixxus will also be debuting its new workflow tool, Content Kanban. Learn more about CCC’s presence at the 2018 London Book Fair here, and browse our panel summaries below.

Collaboration & Community: The Transition to Open Access
Tuesday 10 April 2018, 11:30 – 12:30
The Faculty (Stand 7A11), Hall 7, National Hall
“The UK is well above global averages of open access publishing, and is at the forefront of a significant global movement which is fundamentally changing the way that research is conceived, conducted, disseminated and rewarded,” noted a December 2017 report for the Universities UK Open Access Coordination Group. Responsibility for driving remarkable change across the scholarly publishing landscape is widely shared, yet the evolving relationship of publishers and institutional libraries is perhaps the most critical. The panel will assess the state of OA today and lay out a vision for a sustainable and integrated publishing workflow solution that minimizes costs, promotes transparency and supports a range of business models.

  • Sven Fund, Managing Director, Knowledge Unlatched
  • Chris Leonard, Head of Product, Emerald Group Publishing
  • Matthew Day, Head of Open and Data Publishing, Cambridge University Press
  • Dr. Danny Kingsley, Deputy Director, Scholarly Communication and Research Services, Cambridge University Library

Use your Data to Drive Revenue
Tuesday, 10 Apr 2018, 13:00 – 14:00

The Faculty
“Data is the new oil” hit the headlines last year. So, what about monetising the data you already hold? Publishers hold a vast array of information about customers, authors, and content, but how do you really generate publishing revenue from this untapped resource. This session will give practical advice from expert speakers across several types of publishing data.
How to utilise the information you hold about customers. Where to start, from organising customer data in different systems, to analysing your interactions with institutions. How you can prospect against organisation profiles, author affiliations, and other data elements.
How to use taxonomies help improve search and discovery. Much has been said about taxonomies, ontologies, authority files, and other controls. But how do they actually work to improve search discovery? How are they implemented, where, and why?
How to evaluate technologies that will help organisations make the most of their content through effective storage and semantic exploitation. Addressing the hyper-personalisation of content and how less is often more in effective delivery of the content users want.

  • Laura Cox, Ringgold, Inc.
  • Dr Ian Synge, Ixxus
  • Margie Hlava, artist

Global Copyright Legislation: What you need to know
Wednesday 11 April 2018, 11:30 – 12:00
The Faculty
Hosted by ALPSP, panelists will provide a roundup of recent and proposed amendments to copyright legislation in the US, Europe and Australia.

  • Sarah Faulder, PLS
  • Roy Kaufman, Copyright Clearance Center
  • Ruth Tellis, RightsZone & Rights2

Small Steps, Giant Leaps: The Digital Transformation Experience
Wednesday 11 April 2018, 13:00 – 14:00
The Faculty (Stand 7A11), Hall 7, National Hall
Content management and digital transformation depend on technology, clearly. Yet a successful digital transformation project will rely as much on redefining and reimagining the experiences of customers, employees, and other stakeholders as it does on the underlying solution. Meanwhile, content management plays an increasingly critical role as part of a wider set of smart information management strategies guide decision-making process and direct technology investments. The panel will share stories of innovation in publishing marked by changes in workflow and production as well as in markets and customer habits.

  • John Newton, Co-founder, Alfresco
  • Kiren Shoman, Executive Director, Book Editorial, SAGE Publications
  • Jonathan Brett-Harris, Managing Director, Ixxus
  • Junaid Mubeen, Director of Education, Whizz Education
  • Kathryn Earle, Managing Director, Digital Resources Division, Bloomsbury Publishing Plc

A Copyright Conversation on the Evolving Role of Rights and Licensing in Publishing
Wednesday 11 April 2018, 11:30 – 12:00
Research & Scholarly Publishing Forum
A conversation between two leading figures from the world of copyright on the issues and challenges arising as publishers evolve into technology companies and, likewise, tech companies begin to emerge as publishers.

  • Tracey Armstrong, President and CEO, Copyright Clearance Center
  • Caroline Boyd, COO, The Copyright Hub UK

Aspirations and Anxieties: How Authors See Copyright Today
Thursday 12 April 2018, 13:00 – 14:00
The Faculty (Stand 7A11), Hall 7, National Hall
One of the more complex — and possibly, least understood — areas of publishing is copyright. In 2018, copyright laws and general respect for intellectual property face tremendous public and policy pressures in the UK, across the EU and around the world. How do authors consider the threats to their livelihoods — and how are the managing the opportunities? What, in other words, do the actual copyright-holders think about copyright? Join author Daniel Hahn and lawyer Nicola Solomon, chief executive of the UK Society of Authors, as they discuss the authors’ perspective, in conversation with the Copyright Clearance Center’s Christopher Kenneally.

  • Daniel Hahn, Prize-winning Translator
  • Nicola Solomon, Chief Executive, Society of Authors

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YouTube Embraces Unique Identifiers with ISNI http://www.copyright.com/blog/youtube-embraces-unique-identifiers-isni/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/youtube-embraces-unique-identifiers-isni/#respond Thu, 22 Mar 2018 17:07:24 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16029 YouTube has announced its adoption of unique serial numbers for each creator through the ISO-regulated ISNI standard.

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Unique identifiers are a useful tool in many consumer experiences. They can assist purchasing decisions (e.g., the paperback ISBN of To Kill a Mockingbird is 9780060935467, versus 9780062420701 for hardcover). They can indicate adherence to quality requirements set by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). They can aid in customer service complaints. Now, unique IDs are coming to YouTube.

I was part of the ISO working group that created the International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) and have represented the International Federation of Reproduction Rights Organizations (IFRRO) as Chairman of the ISNI board for the past two years. It has been fascinating in that time to see the range of communities applying or showing interest in the standard – record labels, collective management organizations, movie studios, libraries, and many more. The ISNI community has also become global with members and registration agencies in Asia, Europe, and North America.

It was announced in January 2018 that YouTube has decided to adopt ISNI and will assign unique ISNIs to the creators whose work appears on the platform for the purposes of accurate attribution and data reconciliation. The adoption of any standard numbering scheme by a company as large and influential as YouTube is a big deal in the world of metadata, and the move has been widely acclaimed. Others are sure to follow. Long used by national and other libraries, YouTube’s move propels ISNI into the music space and the commercial world in a big way.

Learn more: Executive Director of the ISNI International Agency Tim Devenport speaks to Beyond the Book

YouTube Knows Who You Are - Tim Devenport

If you’re not familiar with ISNI, it’s an international standard (ISO 27729). It’s a unique, sixteen-digit number assigned to each “public identity” of a creator such as an artist, musician, writer, or illustrator and is intended to help fix the problem of name ambiguity in applications such as search and discovery, attribution, and payment. Approximately 9 million individuals and 700,000 organizations currently have ISNIs assigned to them. ISNI is gradually becoming a critical component in Linked Data and Semantic Web applications and is already used extensively by libraries and archives to share catalog information.

The assignment of unique numbers to identities, whether they are individual (e.g. John Lennon), collective (The Beatles), organizational (CNN) or fictional (Spiderman) can be a great boon, for example, when it comes to making accurate royalty payments. Librarians have understood for years the value of assigning unique numbers to identities in library catalogs and bibliographies, to help eliminate, or at least minimize, the confusion caused by common names or variant spellings of names. Is it Mao Tse Tung or Mao Zedong, Dostoevsky or Dostoevskii? I wonder if Michael Jackson, the American jazz guitarist, ever gets sent in error the royalties owed to The King of Pop? If so, does he ever send them back? These are the kinds of real-world problems that unique numbering of individuals is designed to solve.

In the late 1960s a cult TV show in the UK called The Prisoner baffled and entertained audiences. Its hero, known only as Number 6, proclaimed at the beginning of every episode, “I am not a number. I am a free man.” The numbering of individuals has dystopian overtones, but it’s hard to deny its value in some contexts. Standard numbers have been a feature of the media industries for decades and have played a key part in building efficient, global supply chains. Books, journals, and recordings have had unique numbers for years, and now digital creators are following that trend.

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Global Publishing Trends in 2018 http://www.copyright.com/blog/global-publishing-trends-2018/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/global-publishing-trends-2018/#respond Thu, 15 Mar 2018 17:45:00 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=15984 The three driving forces behind digital disruption in global publishing are economic shifts, market fragmentation and consumer power.

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How big is global book publishing? And why should you care? Because within the business data lie critical clues for digital transformation.

Rüdiger Wischenbart , co-founder of BookMap, a non-profit initiative on international publishing statistics, believes an understanding of world book markets can drive decisions that will position your content to best advantage everywhere.

Global Publishing Trends in 2018

Author of the highly-regarded Global eBook Report, Wischenbart shared his latest data on the world’s biggest publishing markets during a recent Copyright Clearance Center webinar. As lines blur among books and other media, publishers must manage content assets and rights with the confidence that comes with quality data.

“When we speak here about digital, I’m not only talking about e-books. I’m talking about a digital transformation. I mean that a publishing company suddenly is driven and organized in a digitally organized value chain and work processes,” Wischenbart explains.

“Three major forces that really make the change. Number one, we have arrived – it’s not the future, it’s the present. We have arrived in a network economy for the book industry as well, and that means we have winner-take-all markets, where a few major and bigger and better-financed players are in a so much stronger position than all the little guys.

Learn More: Explore CCC’s Copyright Certificate Courses

“This is reinforced by market fragmentation,” he continues. “When I have a big organization, I can play around here and experiment there and acquire a little start-up or a little imprint from somewhere else. I can really play across all those different niches and fields. I even can fix a mistake that I may have made when – just recently in the US, Michael Wolff’s Fire and Fury [has been] so much more successful than the publisher had expected. I have the tools to do this, and that is making the competition so much stronger against all the small and middle-sized publishing companies.

“Finally, a third factor [is] that is publishing traditionally thought that the publishers, the authors, and their offer are defining the market. But in a networked economy, in a corporate economy, in all these digital pipes and channels and platforms, it’s the consumers, it’s the customers who define it.”

View the transcript here.

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The OER Curriculum Development Process – Inside Emerging Solutions http://www.copyright.com/blog/the-oer-curriculum-development-process/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/the-oer-curriculum-development-process/#respond Wed, 14 Mar 2018 17:12:17 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=15970 Let’s take a look at the Open Educational Resources (OER) development process and the new solutions that have emerged.

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“Free” open educational resources (OER) are gaining acceptance in U.S. schools. Fueled by funding from large foundations, several OER organizations have developed core curricular programs in reading and mathematics that are now in use in varying degrees in many school districts.

OER’s movement into development of core programs is a turning point in the evolution of open resources. For many years, most OER consisted of supplemental pieces – not large core programs that form the bedrock of instruction at the K-12 level.

But, development of core programs is complex and intensive. Programs must be aligned to academic standards, have scope and sequence and meet requirements some states and/or school districts impose to ensure programs are fit for purpose. The complexities increase further with the development of customized digital programs for personalized learning, which many school districts are adopting.

Despite the complexities, new technologies have been created to support development. Let’s take a look at the development process and the new solutions that have emerged.

Related Reading: Inside the Game-Changing OER Legislation for Publishers

The Development Process

At the outset, developers must establish an instructional design with learning goals, a pedagogy and a research base. The design determines the structure, scope, and sequence of the program so that the curriculum builds over a semester, a year, and across multiple grade levels. In addition, special components are often included (and sometimes required) to address differentiated instruction for a variety of learners:  English language learners, special education students, advanced learners, and other kinds of students.

As editorial work on the program begins, subject area experts are engaged to provide input and expertise. Developers must align content to the prevailing academic standards in each state. Such standards may be developed by states or by national not-for-profit organizations that have created Common Core State Standards in math or English/language arts, the Next Generation Science Standards, and other bodies of standards. Correlations between the standards and draft content are created.

Graphs, artwork, photos, and maps are created for use in the materials.  Permissions must be secured if the media is copyrighted. In keeping with the spirit of “open,” many OER developers seek to use media that is openly licensed.

The program must be fact checked and copy edited multiple times to ensure content is accurate and objective. Independent authorities, evaluators, and master teachers must also vet the prototype program before the program moves into the final phase of production.

Core programs also include ancillary materials for students, as well as teacher editions and other support materials. Publishers provide professional development so faculty can effectively deliver the program. Assessment services are sometimes provided, too.

Keep Learning: With Flexibility, Publishers Can Turn the OER Boom to their Advantage – Here’s How

Customized Curriculum & New Solutions

Development processes have evolved considerably in recent years, as many publishers and developers have started to create digital, personalized learning systems. Personalized learning marks a departure from textbooks and monolithic courses toward flexible, customized content that meets the needs, strengths, and skills of individual learners. These systems can include both OER content materials as well as proprietary or licensed materials.  The value proposition for publishers expands from simply providing high quality, well scoped and sequenced content (which, arguably, OER developers can provide) to include being able to provide the right material at the right time for a particular student or classroom.

Customization and personalization demands the use of a powerful content management systems, that provide content discovery, collaboration, production, and dissemination.

More specifically, discovery tools allow for content tagging, sequencing, and repurposing. Authoring and editing content can be done collaboratively with instructional designers.

All types of learning objects, including videos and interactive content can be stored and managed, along with metadata, standards, and rights and permissions. Courses can be disseminated to web services, apps, district learning management systems, and/or print production.

In sum, this system moves development and production into a “digital first” approach that has been embraced by many educational publishers. And, like so many other aspects of publishing, OER developers will embrace it too, assuming funders are willing to foot the bill.

As has been noted repeatedly in discussions about OER, quality content is not free. It requires funding to create it, organize it, support it and update it on a regular basis.

 

Ready to learn more? Explore the custom solutions Ixxus is building for your peers in publishing.

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Levy vs. License: Collective Licensing in the United States http://www.copyright.com/blog/levy-vs-license/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/levy-vs-license/#respond Thu, 08 Mar 2018 08:00:59 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=15728 The model that we've developed enables rightsholders to choose whether to participate, and if so, which works to license through the system.

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Jessica Pettitt: I’m joined here today by Vice President, Secretary and General Counsel of Copyright Clearance Center, Fred Haber.

Fred, I’m interested in knowing more about the US approach to collective licensing— a market driven option approach.

Why is this more beneficial than a levy system, or something more compulsory, like what exists in other parts of the world?

Frederic Haber: The short answer is that our model provides for greater choice. The levy model, or another model like that, eliminates the possibility of choice on at least one side. What I mean by that is that, in a levy system, often one side or the other might want to opt out but effectively can’t. The model that we’ve developed over the years enables rights holders to choose whether to participate in the licensing system, and if so, which works to license through the system.

The classic example is that you can buy the New York Times on a newsstand for a dollar every day, but you can’t buy a high intensity research biology journal for less than $10,000 a year.

On the flip side, users choose whether or not to take a license based on the terms that are available. The US model is not exclusive in that if our price is too high for what it is that the user wants, for example, the user is able to go directly to the rights holder. If we’re out of line with what the market can support, then it’s possible for both rights holders and users to connect directly.

For example, the Wall Street Journal and a major bank probably have a one-to-one relationship for the use of the Wall Street Journal’s information within that bank. But the Wall Street Journal will participate with us as well, because we’re also going to issue licenses to companies that quarry rocks, or that run retail stores, or that are law firms, which might not be worth a one-to-one negotiation for the Wall Street Journal.

Learn More: Explore CCC’s Copyright Certificate Courses

JP:  Are there any further advantages of a voluntary licensing services beyond choice

FH: Yes, market sensitivity. Market sensitivity determines participation. If, in the long run, rights holders and users don’t both agree with the price at which we’re offering licenses, then one or the other won’t participate.

In a levy system, you’re all in or you’re all out. You really don’t get anything more to it than that.

What our system has also provided is respect for this market sensitivity. It exists in some other systems to a degree, but it doesn’t work all that well there. We offer different prices to different groups of users in the marketplace. This is based on surveys that we do, which indicate that, for example, R&D companies use far more of our science-oriented, copyrighted information than anybody else. So, the prices are higher there, than, for example, in the retail industry, where our surveys indicate very little of the stuff that we have available is used, so the price there is brought down commensurately.

For distributions to rights holders, we also have market sensitivity in that our distribution model is a compromise between a pure volume model (that is, the more that’s copied, the more money you make from us) and a pure value model (that is, the higher your prices in the marketplace already are, the more money you make from us). The classic contrast intended to explain what we are trying to do is that you can buy the New York Times on a newsstand for a dollar or so every day, but you can’t buy a high intensity research biology journal for less than $10,000 a year. There’s something that the market is saying there about the relative value of the two items, and that relative value is built into our distribution model as well.

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Join CCC and Ixxus at Tempo di Libri, Livre Paris and FILBo http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-ixxus-tempo-di-libri-livre-paris-filbo/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-ixxus-tempo-di-libri-livre-paris-filbo/#respond Mon, 05 Mar 2018 08:00:15 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=15859 Catch The Digital Transformation of Publishing: Challenges and Keys to Success in Italian at Tempo di Libri, French at Livre Paris and Spanish at FILBo.

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During March and April, professionals in Italy, France and Colombia will have the opportunity to attend the presentation The Digital Transformation of Publishing: Challenges and Keys to Success.

Where is the publishing industry in its path of digital transformation? What are the obstacles? How can data move more efficiently? Discover the answers through a survey of large international publishing houses and the innovative strategies and solutions proposed by Ixxus, a subsidiary of Copyright Clearance Center (CCC).

Join CCC and Ixxus at Tempo di Libri, Livre Paris and FILBo

8 March 2018, 16:30-17:15

Tempo di Libri (Italian-language conference)

Milan, Italy

Spazio AIE

La trasformazione digitale dell’editoria: sfide e chiavi del successo: Dove si trova l’editoria nel suo percorso di trasformazione digitale? Quali sono gli ostacoli? Come avanzare in modo più efficiente? Victoriano Colodrón presenterà un’indagine condotta tra grandi case editrici internazionali e le strategie e le soluzioni innovative proposte da Ixxus, società sussidiaria di Copyright Clearance Center. #mondodigitale

Join CCC and Ixxus at Tempo di Libri, Livre Paris and FILBo

19 March 2018, 12:00 – 12:30

Livre Paris (French-language conference)

Paris, France

Stand Allemagne, 1-P67

Où en est la transformation numérique de l’édition? Quels sont les obstacles? Comment avancer plus rapidement? Victoriano Colodrón (Copyright Clearance Center) présentera les résultats d’une enquête menée auprès de maisons d’édition internationales, la stratégie développée par Ixxus et des solutions novatrices en matière de “discoverability”, d’agilité des contenus, de métadonnées.

Join CCC and Ixxus at Tempo di Libri, Livre Paris and FILBo

19 April 2018, 12:00-12:30

Feria Internacional del Libro de Bogotá [FILBo] (Spanish-language conference)

Bogotá, Colombia

Stand Frankfurter Buchmesse, 1702A

¿En qué punto se encuentra la industria editorial en su trayecto de transformación digital? ¿Cuáles son los obstáculos que encuentran las editoriales? ¿Y cómo avanzar de una manera más rápida y eficaz? Victoriano Colodrón, de Copyright Clearance Center (CCC), presentará los resultados de una encuesta realizada entre responsables de grandes editoriales internacionales. Asimismo, hablará del enfoque estratégico en torno a la transformación digital que propone la empresa filial de CCC, Ixxus, y de sus soluciones innovadoras en materia de almacenamiento y ‘agilidad’ de los contenidos, metadatos, discoverability y colaboración.

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