Open Access – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com Rights Licensing Expert Tue, 23 Jan 2018 19:23:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.copyright.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/cropped-ccc-favicon-32x32.png Open Access – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com 32 32 5 Tips for Keeping Your Finger on the Open Access Pulse http://www.copyright.com/blog/5-tips-keeping-finger-open-access-pulse/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/5-tips-keeping-finger-open-access-pulse/#respond Thu, 18 Jan 2018 08:00:13 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=15322 Keep your fingers on the pulse of open access with events, news feeds, influencers and trends to watch in the year ahead.

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The pace of change in open access shows no sign of slackening in 2018. Here, Rob Johnson shares his advice on keeping up to date with the latest developments.

1.     Step out of your comfort zone

Whether it’s the London and Frankfurt Book Fairs for publishers, or the UKSG and Charleston conferences for librarians, most members of the scholarly communications community have annual get-togethers that are not to be missed. Yet if you want to be challenged in your thinking about what’s just around the corner, I’d encourage you to try heading somewhere different in 2018. Opportunities abound to step out of your comfort zone:

  • Wishing you could talk through issues with representatives of different communities? Join one of the cross-stakeholder workshops at the Researcher to Reader Conference in London, 26 & 27 February 2018
  • Wondering what’s on the mind of institutional research managers? Head to Edinburgh in June for INORMS 2018 – the biennial congress of the International Network of Research Management Societies.
  • Puzzled as to what students and early career researchers think about openness? Check out one of the OpenCon 2018 events happening all over the world
  • Looking for a global view on trends in the library community? Make your way to the World Library and Information Congress in Kuala Lumpar, Malaysia, 24-30 August 2018.
  • Fancy debating the ins and outs of OA above the Arctic Circle? Make plans for the 13th Munin Conference in Tromsø, Norway in late November.

2.     Review your news feeds

One challenge is filtering out the nuggets of useful information from the noise, but you should also ask yourself whether you are at risk of confirmation bias. If your desire is for an open scholarly commons without private actors, challenge yourself to read Kent Anderson’s list of ‘things publishers do’ with an open mind.

Of course, not everyone has the luxury of jetting off to far-flung corners of the world – most of us have limited travel budgets, and more than enough work piling up back home. Fortunately, there is no shortage of online sources of information in the scholarly communications ecosystem. It’s hard to beat the Scholarly Kitchen blog for informed commentary on the latest developments in scholarly communications, and for publishers, professional associations like STM and ALPSP provide regular members-only updates. Meanwhile, librarians are well-served by the Association of Research Libraries in the US, LIBER in Europe, and numerous national consortia and professional bodies.

One challenge is filtering out the nuggets of useful information from the noise, but you should also ask yourself whether you are at risk of confirmation bias. If your desire is for an open scholarly commons without private actors, challenge yourself to read Kent Anderson’s list of ‘things publishers do’ with an open mind. If you can’t understand why others get so excited about open access, follow SPARC (@SPARC_NA) or SPARC Europe (@SPARC_EU) on Twitter. And if you’re uncomfortable with the idea of funding bodies intervening in the publishing process, make a point of following the EC’s open access policy team and trying to understand their thinking (@OpenAccessEC).

3.     Move to ‘just in time’ information

Peter Suber’s OA tracking project (@oatp) provides crowd-sourced alerts about dozens of open access developments across the world every day. Meanwhile, the UK’s Royal Society of Biology and NFAIS Advances in the US both offer regular news digests which are free to subscribe to, and provide a handy overview of recent developments. Yet even with the best will in the world, no-one can read and interpret everything that’s going on.

The solution is simply not to try. Instead, as Tim Ferriss puts it in the 4-hour work week: ‘Follow your to-do short list and fill in the information gaps as you go,’ focussing on what Kathy Sierra calls ‘just-in-time’ information instead of ‘just-in-case’ information. If you need to do some strategizing about key market opportunities, read up on what’s relevant to the markets in question. If you’re asked to make a recommendation on adopting a new system, or work with a new partner, read up on these. If you’ve got your newsfeeds right, you can just skim the headlines, and file the information until you need to read it. And if a few weeks or months go by and you haven’t needed to refer to something, delete it without feeling guilty.

4.     Beware the hype cycle

Right now, it seems like everyone is talking about the potential for artificial intelligence (AI) and blockchain to revolutionise our world, and scholarly communications is no different. The ability to crawl articles for indexing and pass them as data to software is central to the open access movement, and opening articles up for machine learning offers great potential. Meanwhile, a recent Digital Science report raises the possibility of micropayments based on blockchain technology as a new model for access to content.

Yet as Gartner’s Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies shows, both machine learning and blockchain are currently close to a peak of inflated expectations, and heading for the ‘trough of disillusionment’. A small minority of people need to be actively exploring these initiatives within scholarly communications, but for most of us the point where they intersect with our working lives remains some distance off. Yet don’t write them off entirely. After the trough of disillusionment come the ‘slope of enlightenment’ and finally the ‘plateau of productivity’, when emerging technologies finally deliver on their promise

5.     Focus on trends, not events

Marketing teams do their best to convince us that events are significant, but it’s the trends that matter. In my previous post I highlighted the fact that 2018 will pose real questions about the sustainability of open access business models. This is one trend to watch closely, and I see three others that merit attention in 2018:

  • Increasing legislative intervention – Whether it’s the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) and the Digital Single Market Strategy in Europe, or the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR) in the US, legislative developments will undoubtedly play a part in shaping open access over the coming year. Meanwhile, legal judgements in cases involving Researchgate and Sci-Hub will help define the limits of academic content-sharing on the internet, and, indirectly, the future of open access.
  • Rising adoption of identifiers – With the launch of Metadata2020, the push for more reusable and connected research outputs will gather momentum in 2018. Persistent identifiers already exist for researchers and contributors (ORCID iDs), for data and software (DataCite DOIs), for journal articles, preprints, conference proceedings, peer reviews and monographs and standards (Crossref DOIs), and for Funders (Open Funder Registry IDs). Crossref is now preparing for the introduction of global Persistent Identifiers for grants, awards, and facilities. Knowing when and how to implement these identifiers in existing systems and workflows will be critical for all stakeholders in the OA ecosystem.

Moving from openness to impact

In the wider world of science policy, ‘impact’ is the word on every policymaker’s lips. From the UK’s Research Excellence Framework and the Netherlands’ Standard Evaluation Protocol to Australia’s National Innovation and Science Agenda, researchers and their institutions are under pressure to demonstrate the economic and societal impact of research. Over the next year we can expect see the emphasis begin to shift from simply making more content open, to asking what ‘impact’ the move to openness has had. We can expect this to throw up some challenging questions, with few easy answers.

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A Look Back: Challenges of OA in 2017 http://www.copyright.com/blog/look-back-challenges-oa-2017/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/look-back-challenges-oa-2017/#respond Thu, 14 Dec 2017 08:00:50 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14621 Top OA issues: the burden of expected author OA expertise; the underutilization of metadata in the publication lifecycle, and the challenges posed to authors and institutions by one-off solutions.

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Over the course of the year, three issues repeatedly reared their heads as barriers to the successful implementation of Open Access: the burden of expected author OA expertise; the underutilization of metadata in the publication lifecycle, and the challenges posed to authors and institutions by one-off solutions. October 2017 marked the tenth Open Access Week. With its theme on the concrete benefits of making scholarly research openly available, where have we gotten to in solving these problems and realizing the potential of OA?

1. The OA compliance labyrinth increases the burden on authors

By now, institutions, funders and publishers have developed a raft of OA guidelines and systems. But is it realistic or reasonable to expect authors to learn a whole new ecosystem in addition to their day jobs? A recent report from OpenAIRE identified a lack of incentives for authors to move to OA and the need to improve technical infrastructure for publishing and archiving. Likewise, the level of complexity is such that author education is no longer a suitable strategy for enabling OA authors to get to publication. Instead, the focus must shift to author automation, using technology to save time and improve the author experience. Systems can be structured using logic rules to drive pre-population of key fields and menus to help them understand what they should know and do to successfully comply with the policies of all stakeholders.

As the 10th Open Access Week draws to a close, with its focus on the concrete benefits of making scholarly research openly available, where have we gotten to in solving these problems and realizing the potential of OA?

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation set up Chronos (reported at the ALPSP conference) to help grantees focus on research, rather than the process of publishing, by helping them identify and submit work to compliant journals. And as reported in this earlier post, Copyright Clearance Center are working to develop a new range of tools within RightsLink© platform to assist authors in seamlessly complying with publisher, funder, and institutional mandates.

2. Metadata are underutilized pre- and post-article-publication

Upstream of article publication, consistent metadata is essential for successfully automating author Article Publication Charge workflows. Without requiring metadata such as funding information, author affiliations, or ORCiDs, publishers cannot deliver a smart compliant workflow that removes the burden of OA expertise from the author. Likewise, open doesn’t necessarily mean discoverable in the post-publication ecosystem. Without the appropriate, consistent metadata, it’s just online content that doesn’t find an audience, deliver its potential impact, further scientific dialogue, or provide recognition for the researcher(s).

What’s being done to orchestrate metadata adoption and related policy to ensure consistency across the STM industry? A new initiative – Metadata 2020 – launched in September 2017, aims to elevate metadata to the level of strategic priority for the whole research community. Key stakeholders have agreed to work together to connect systems and communities, remove duplication, improve discoverability and boost innovation.

3.  Authors and institutions are disadvantaged by the multiplication of proprietary solutions

While large publishers have resources to build new bespoke systems, what happens to other stakeholders if they all pursue proprietary solutions? Authors, funders and institutions are asked to register for, learn about, and use a myriad of individual systems. Now is the time to ask ourselves whether the big disadvantage of this approach is less uptake of OA across the board. We have already witnessed the clear expression of researchers’ preference for a consistent and unified user experience in the area of content discovery, reflected in the rise of non-publisher-specific platforms like ResearchGate. Is the APC payment space next to follow?

If we want to find a cost-effective and user-friendly experience to managing the APC process, outsourced, interoperable approaches will be critical in making the process efficient and effective.

 

 

A version of this post originally appeared in IP Watch.

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Defining Open Access in 4 Minutes or Less http://www.copyright.com/blog/defining-open-access-4-minutes-less/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/defining-open-access-4-minutes-less/#respond Thu, 16 Nov 2017 08:00:05 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14875 Roy Kaufman provides a quick but informative overview about Open Access and its impact on the availability of valuable content.

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Open Access has been described as everything from a business model to a movement. Join Roy Kaufman as he provides a quick but informative overview about Open Access and its impact on the availability and use of valuable content.

Open Access has been described as everything from a business model to a movement, and it generally involves the ability of users to access articles in full text from the open web, without the necessity of having to pay a license fee, a pay-per-use fee, or other provide information before being able to access the article.

There are some definitions of open access that also include licensing. Some people will define open access as requiring that the article have a license which allows people to reuse the work, make derivatives of the work, mine the work, and do other things without the permission from the original author, always so long as attribution is used. Others have less expansive versions, and generally view things to be open access so long as a user can get to it.

At a recent event called the Open Scholarship Initiative, which was sponsored by the United Nations, I participated in a panel which was out there to define “open.” Now, it was more than just open access because it was about open scholarship, and in that group, we defined openness as a continuum of various attributes. Those attributes include things not just involving reuse rights, but…

  • How open is the peer review?
  • Is the underlying data made openly available?
  • Is it searchable?
  • Is it able to be linked to on the web?
  • Can people find it?
  • Can people use it?
  • Is the sponsorship of the underlying research disclosed in a clear and concise way?

So, the moment you start talking about openness, there are a whole lot of other attributes beyond just being able to access the document, which we would all agree is the fundamental baseline, and other attributes such as the ones I’ve mentioned.

There are also several other flavors of open access which are often known as Gold Road and Green Road. Those terms can be really confusing, but the simplest way to think about it, particularly if you’re a user or author, is under the Gold Road, the article is published upon the payment of a fee to a publisher, and the article, the version of record, is then available to everyone.

Under the Green Road, which is favored by some governments under mandates, the version of record isn’t generally made available. It’s a version of the article that’s made available prior to publication. So, it might not have copyediting, links, pagination, and a lot of the value-add that publishers put on. When you access articles thus, particularly if you’re in a repository and not on a publisher’s website, you do want to check, is this the version of record or some other version, the submitted version or the accepted version, or even a version that’s been modified since publication.

Now, I realize I’ve just thrown a million concepts at you, and all of these concepts are not just complicated but often subject to dispute. So what I’ll recommend, as I often do, is some links where you can get more information.

 

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Open Access Master Class: University APCs [Video] http://www.copyright.com/blog/open-access-master-class-university-apcs/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/open-access-master-class-university-apcs/#respond Fri, 27 Oct 2017 15:00:47 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14637 Experts discuss how integrated workflows, which leverage standards and best practices, can ease the business burden of Article Publication Charges (APCs).

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Publishers, Universities, and Funders Must Help Authors Navigate the OA Landscape. Maurits van der Graaf, Senior Consultant, Pleiades Consulting, and Laura Cox, CFO and COO, Ringgold, Inc. agree that tracking Article Publication Charges (APCs) brings costly inefficiency to the manuscript submission workflow for authors, funders and university staff.

In this Hot Spot session from Frankfurt Book Fair 2017, they discuss how integrated workflows, which leverage standards and best practices, can help ease the business burden.

Looking for more information on Open Access? Check out:

Open Access in the Corporate Context
Open Access Must-Reads, October 2017
7 Steps to Help your Authors Through the APC Maze
To Buy or Not to Buy: Proprietary vs. Packaged APC Solutions

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Finding a Third Way to Open Access http://www.copyright.com/blog/finding-third-way-open-access/ Wed, 25 Oct 2017 08:00:32 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14288 Entrenched viewpoints on both sides of the open access debate risk leaving authors stuck in no man’s land, argues Rob Johnson.

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It is easy to set up straw men when it comes to open access (OA). On the one hand are those who believe all scholarly content should be free, with little regard for the value the publishing process adds. On the other are publishers, denounced as corporate entities prioritising the interests of shareholders at the expense of the research community.

Dig a little deeper and these binary distinctions quickly start to break down. Where should a learned society that relies on subscription revenues to fulfil its charitable mission sit on the issue? Or how do we accommodate the fact that the biggest of those corporate entities, Elsevier, is also one of the world’s largest OA journal publishers? Spend time with those on the other side of the debate, and you tend to find they are just as passionate about helping researchers get published as you are. They just have different ideas on how to go about it.

The view from the frontline

The lack of communication between different open access stakeholders has big implications for authors. A recent study for Knowledge Exchange found that researchers in six European countries sometimes take more than an hour just to pay article processing charges (APCs).

In response, many institutions have invested in their library support services and agreed to offsetting arrangements with publishers. Yet it would appear the message to authors is not getting through. Maurits van der Graaf, author of the Knowledge Exchange study, explains: ‘Several respondents failed to mention the library as an information source about OA. In some interviews, it was opportune to mention offsetting deals arranged by the library, but quite often the respondent was not familiar with this development.’

This problem cuts both ways, with publishers also struggling to convey OA options to researchers. Take the Royal Society of Chemistry’s voucher scheme, for example. Van der Graaf notes that ‘this voucher system hardly functions in the French institutions, as it is difficult to distribute the vouchers to researchers’. Add the requirements of funders into the mix, and it’s no wonder that many researchers are left dazed and confused when it comes to open access.

What the data tells us

Such a complex landscape clearly needs to be better mapped out, and there are areas where the fog is clearing. In 2009 (four years after introducing its OA mandate), the UK’s Wellcome Trust reported only a 35 per cent compliance rate. By 2016 this had risen to 91 per cent. Delivering this change took a lot of communication with authors, institutions and publishers. In 2015, Robert Kiley, Head of Digital Services at the Wellcome Library, announced a total of 4,016 email discussions with publishers over the previous decade.

In a 2016 article, Najko Jahn and Marco Tullney drew on cost data from the Open APC initiative to examine how much German research organisations spent on OA publication fees. Publication fees ranged from €40 to as much as €7,419. Meanwhile, institutions reported paying for as few as six articles, and as many as 2,800. Similar data-collection initiatives are underway at the UK’s Jisc and the Austrian Science Fund (FWF).

Unknown unknowns

These studies are as interesting for what they cannot tell us, as for what they can. Jahn and Tullney describe wide variations in APC fees at the same journal, and admit it is difficult to understand what lies behind these. Reporting mechanisms are also not yet mature: Jisc has admitted that it lacks data on APCs paid outside funder block grants, and the German study is based on self-reported data across participating institutions.

Stakeholders must work together

We are making progress in opening up published research, but we need to do much more to open up metadata and business processes. It is likely that the variations in pricing that stump institutions and researchers could be quickly explained by publishers, for example. Commercial concerns mean getting access to this information is not always straightforward, but organisations at the nexus between the different stakeholders are starting to facilitate this kind of data-sharing.

One example is CHORUS, which aims to deliver public access to content reporting on funded research. Leveraging publisher infrastructure, it has developed mechanisms to report on publicly accessible articles to funders and, now, institutions. Howard Ratner, CHORUS’s executive director, explains: ‘Increasingly we have come to see that this is a three-legged stool, involving funding agencies, institutions and publishers. If you exclude any one of those the whole thing falls over.’

Another is Copyright Clearance Center (CCC), which is working to develop an ‘institutional toolset’ for gold OA. ‘We realised that the data we gather from our publishers can be immensely valuable to institutions and funders,’ explains Jen Goodrich, CCC’s director of product management. ‘Our aim is to connect these different stakeholders through data-driven tools that can simplify workflows and increase efficiency.’

With so many organisations involved, these initiatives offer a way to bring different players together, and to ground the debate in real data. In politics, the ‘third way’ emerged as a synthesis of right-wing economics and left-wing social policies. Perhaps it’s time for us to embrace a ‘third way to OA’ – enabling us to harness the dynamism of commercial players in the interests of opening up research findings to the world.

This post originally appeared in Research Information.

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Open Access in the Corporate Context http://www.copyright.com/blog/open-access-corporate-context/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/open-access-corporate-context/#respond Tue, 24 Oct 2017 08:00:06 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14541 In honor of Open Access Week, discover how this alternative publishing model impacts content users in the business world.

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In honor of Open Access Week, discover how this increasingly popular alternative publishing model impacts content users in the business world.

Can you Trust It? Using Open Access Materials in the Corporate World

Can you Trust It? Using Open Access Materials in the Corporate World

Do you understand the economic underpinnings of each Open Access model? Here’s your guide.

There are various flavors, meanings and models of Open Access, but once you have the basic differences down, it’s worth exploring the economic underpinnings of each model.

Understanding Open Access Research Content in the Corporate World

Understanding Open Access Research Content in the Corporate World: 4 Need-to-Know Terms and Their Definitions

To best understand what advantages can be gained from the use of Open Access content, here is a mini-primer in four areas of OA.

On March 23, 2017, the New York Times reported on a story originally published in Nature about a sting operation against predatory open access (OA) publishers. The sting was organized by a researcher whose assumed name translated to “Dr. Fraud.”

Finding a cure for cancer: open data, open collaboration and open minds

Finding a Cure for Cancer: Open Data, Open Collaboration and Open Minds

Every step towards creating a medical environment with access to anonymized open data is a step in the right direction.

“Let’s make America the country that cures cancer once and for all.”

It was this statement from former President Barack Obama’s 2016 State of the Union address that prompted the creation of a national initiative to fight cancer – the Cancer Moonshot bill

 

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Open Access Must-Reads, October 2017 http://www.copyright.com/blog/open-access-must-reads-october-2017/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/open-access-must-reads-october-2017/#respond Mon, 23 Oct 2017 08:00:03 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14536 CCC and ALPSP team up to pick top industry headlines from Research Information, EUA, Chronicle of Higher Education and more.

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Together with the Association for Learned and Professional Publishing (ALPSP), Copyright Clearance Center is excited to share the Fall 2017 edition of the “Open Access Must-Reads” series – a thoughtfully curated selection of important articles from the past few months that expound upon “can’t miss” developments in the world of Open Access.


1) The Chronicle of Higher Education: Elsevier Embraces Data-Sharing Standards, in Step Toward Scientific Openness

The reach of the Transparency and Openness Promotion guidelines increased by over 50% when Elsevier committed its catalogue to the set of open standards. The guidelines will now be used by three of the world’s four largest scientific-journal publishers. Brian A. Nosek, co-founder and director of the Center for Open Science, counts this as a big “biggest affirmative step toward promoting data sharing across its entire journal portfolio.”

2) OA in European universities : Open Access: 2015-2016 EUA Survey results and Towards Full OA in 2020

The European University Association has issued two reports as output from the EUA Expert Group on Science 2.0/Open Science.
Open Access: 2015-2016 EUA Survey results reports on a survey which found that just over half of universities have an institutional policy on OA, with a further 23.6% in the process of developing one. However most of these are ‘encouragement’ policies and not mandates to deposit in the institutional repository. About a quarter of universities provide financial support for APCs.
Towards Full OA in 2020  provides recommendations for university leaders. It states that both Gold and Green routes to OA should be pursued, and that cost transparency is ‘non-negotiable requirement’. It states that greater awareness-raising about OA requirements and options is required, and that universities should develop policies to facilitate greater OA.

3) Australian government endorses OA

The Australian Federal Government recently confirmed its support of the recommendation for a national (and states and territories) OA policy in its response to the Australian Productivity Commission report on IP.
The recommendation (16.1) states that an OA policy should be implemented for all publicly funded research with a 12-month embargo period. The report also asks that the Australian government work to establish similar policies with the international agencies with which it collaborates.

4) Research Information: Finding a third way to open access

Rob Johnson advocates for walking a mile in each other’s shoes when it comes to the debate on open access. “The lack of communication between different open access stakeholders has big implications for authors. A recent study for Knowledge Exchange found that researchers in six European countries sometimes take more than an hour just to pay article processing charges (APCs).”

5) We’ve failed: Pirate black open access is trumping green and gold and we must change our approach

Sci-Hub has made nearly all articles freely available using a black open access model, leaving green and gold models in its dust.  Is there something structurally wrong with our approach to OA if, after twenty years, it has yet to reach sustainable ground in the industry? Toby Green answers this question and tackles the larger issue of what could be done to turn it around.

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Frankfurt Book Fair 2017: A Look Ahead http://www.copyright.com/blog/frankfurt-book-fair-2017-look-ahead/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/frankfurt-book-fair-2017-look-ahead/#respond Thu, 05 Oct 2017 08:00:40 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14363 CCC’s Director of International Relations has a few recommendations for can’t-miss events if you’re going to #FBM17.

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With Frankfurt Book Fair 2017 only a week away, CCC’s Michael Healy, Executive Director of International Relations, has a few recommendations for can’t-miss events that you should mark on your calendar if you’re going to the Fair:

  • Frankfurt Rights MeetingThis has been a “must attend” event for senior rights professionals for 30+ years. The program is always fascinating and the networking excellent. Looking forward especially to the sessions on Japan this year.
  • The MarketsThe Markets is always a great, concentrated opportunity to learn about what’s happening in particular key markets and some lesser-known ones. UK, India and Malaysia feature this year. The panel discussion on women in publishing, featuring CCC’s President and CEO Tracey Armstrong, looks like one not to be missed!
  • Knowledge Engineering: The new business value accelerator in the digital transformation journeyIf you’re a publisher interested in extending the value of your content, this session on knowledge engineering should be essential. Learn how data analysis can drive content discovery for your business with CCC’s CTO Babis Marmanis and Carl Robinson, senior publishing consultant at Ixxus.
  • Towards a copyright manifesto for international publishingCopyright is a hot topic right now and no longer just for lawyers and academics. This session features insights from those on the front line of the copyright wars, including me!
  • Open Access Master Class: University APCs: Publishers and institutional leadership require a solution for the inefficiency of Article Publication Charges (APCs). Join Maurits van der Graaf of Pleiade Management and Consultancy and Laura Cox of Ringgold in conversation with CCC’s Chris Kenneally, Business Development Director to find out what a business-minded application that serves all stakeholders could mean to the bottom line for you, and your partners too.
  • The Arts+: Frankfurt isn’t just about books these days, and The Arts+ is the place to find out what the future of the creative industries looks like. Great sessions on the interplay between tech and creativity are promised.

Exhibitors to visit:

  • IPR License: Hall 4.2, Stand E19
  • Guest of Honor 2017: France: Hall F.1 Stand A1
  • Copyright Clearance Center: Hall 4.2 Stand E18

 

We’ll see you at the Frankfurt Book Fair, 10-15 October 2017.

Join Us at the Hot Spots, Location: Hall 4.2 N99

Knowledge Engineering: The New Business-Value Accelerator in the Digital Transformation Journey Add to your calendar app: Wednesday, 11 October, 11:00–11:30

Open Access Master Class: University APCs  Add to your calendar app: Thursday, 12 October, 15:00–15:30

Visit Us at Hall 4.2, Stand E18

Book a Meeting with the team

Tweet with Us@copyrightclear#cccfrankfurt#fbm17

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Join CCC at NFAIS 2017 Open Access Conference http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-nfais-2017-open-access-conference/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-nfais-2017-open-access-conference/#respond Thu, 28 Sep 2017 08:00:26 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14315 Explore the open business model through the lens of multidimensional disruption at NFAIS 2017 Open Access Conference.

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Join CCC’s Christopher Kenneally, Business Development Director, at the National Federation of Advanced Information Services (NFAIS) 2017 Open Access Conference on October 2-3, 2017 in Old Town Alexandria, VA. On the opening day, Chris will explore the challenges presented to publishers and authors when funders and academic institutions issue mandates and otherwise raise the level of their involvement in the manuscript submission workflow.

As Open Access models have evolved and become more complex – particularly around Article Processing Charges (APCs) – publishers and authors have been left to their own devices to sort out the table stakes of license requirements, VAT, and compliance mandates. Institutional arrangements for paying APCs, sometimes connected to large subscription deals, add further strain to the workflow. To combat these challenges, each stakeholder in the OA publishing ecosystem must have a seat at the table. Chris will share his take on what’s needed to bring order to the chaos.

Don’t miss his presentation, “Take a Seat at the Table: All OA Stakeholders Welcome” during the panel Managing Open Access – Workflows and Pain Points on Monday, October 2 from 4:10 to 5:30 PM.

Stay connected to the conversation by following @NFAISForum and @CopyrightClear on Twitter.

Related Reading: Open Access on the Velocity of Content Blog

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Frankfurt Book Fair “Hot Spot” Presentations Highlight Digital Transformation Journey http://www.copyright.com/blog/frankfurt-book-fair-hot-spot-presentations-highlight-digital-transformation-journey/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/frankfurt-book-fair-hot-spot-presentations-highlight-digital-transformation-journey/#respond Thu, 21 Sep 2017 08:00:27 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14229 Join Us at the FBF Hot Spots in Hall 4.2 N99, and visit our booth Hall 4.2, Stand E18.

The post Frankfurt Book Fair “Hot Spot” Presentations Highlight Digital Transformation Journey appeared first on Copyright Clearance Center.

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For all its celebration of literature, science, and creative expression, Frankfurt Book Fair in 2017 can often feel like a technology business trade show. Software vendors tout a myriad of solutions for digital transformation, from facilitating collaboration on a global scale to delivering analytic insights from deep within big data.

In Hall 4.2, technology vendors take their turn in the spotlight at a series of 30-minute “hot spot” presentations targeting scientific and technical publishers. Coming up in October, Copyright Clearance Center and its subsidiary Ixxus host a pair of these hot spots. CCC’s Chuck Hemenway provides a preview for both events in a special edition of the Beyond the Book podcast. (The transcript is available here.)

CCC delivers solutions for accelerating global access to knowledge in Frankfurt.

 On Wednesday, 11 October, at 11:00, Ixxus presents, “Knowledge Engineering: The New Business Value Accelerator in the Digital Transformation Journey.”

“This really pertains to the journey of digital transformation,” notes Hemenway. “Everybody’s talked about it – we all need to transform our businesses. Knowledge engineering is a simple extension of that thinking – getting at the real assets that are locked up inside data and mastering the tools of mining, analytics and semantic enrichment required to get there.”

On Thursday, 12 October at 3:00 PM (1500) CCC offers, “An Open Access master class for publishers – University APCs.”

As Hemenway tells it, “We started out this OA journey a few years ago, working from the publisher end because that’s where it’s the most critical to have these new functionalities. Now, we’re building up from that foundation to meet the institutions where they are, and the funders where they are, to let them get access to that shared data and to have approval workflows that for years they’ve been asking for.”

We’ll see you at the Frankfurt Book Fair, 10-15 October 2017.

Join Us at the Hot Spots, Location: Hall 4.2 N99

Knowledge Engineering: The New Business-Value Accelerator in the Digital Transformation Journey Add to your calendar app: Wednesday, 11 October, 11:00–11:30

Open Access Master Class: University APCs  Add to your calendar app: Thursday, 12 October, 15:00–15:30

Visit Us at Hall 4.2, Stand E18

Book a Meeting with the team

Tweet with Us @copyrightclear #cccfrankfurt #fbm17

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