Information Management – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com Rights Licensing Expert Fri, 20 Apr 2018 20:37:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.copyright.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/cropped-ccc-favicon-32x32.png Information Management – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com 32 32 Creating an Information Center Strategy Driven By Data [5 Questions with Britt Mueller] http://www.copyright.com/blog/information-center-strategy-britt-mueller/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/information-center-strategy-britt-mueller/#respond Mon, 22 Jan 2018 15:58:23 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=15360 How do you create a data-driven content strategy? Information center expert Britt Mueller is sharing her top tips for justifying content spend.

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As information and knowledge managers, we want to be able to easily justify content spending, advocate for change, and request more information center resources.

This is difficult (bordering on near impossible) to do if you don’t have a strategy that incorporates your content data.

In a recent webinar, information expert Britt Mueller laid a four-step foundation for creating a data-driven strategy:

  1. Assess your data
  2. Establish a content portfolio
  3. Involve the right people
  4. Align your portfolio to organizational goals
Britt Mueller
Principal, InfoLiquidity Consulting
Solutions Architect, Library Services Business, Iron Mountain

Even with this guidance, it’s still no easy task. Here’s some guidance from Britt, based on questions she’s received around creating this type of strategy:

If one finds that there is content that is not directly related to the higher end goal of the organization, what steps can be taken to realign it?

BM: If you’re looking at your portfolio and you find that content doesn’t align with a strategic need – you need to closely evaluate it. Ask yourself: Am I buying the right thing? Do I need to market this differently, so it gets more eyes on it? What was the goal for this purchase when it was first bought, and is it still being used in that way?

To be valued, content needs to be used. Portfolios change, and sometimes your content is going to shift – and that’s okay.

How do you present data to stakeholders (beyond “your users used this journal x times”)?  How do you build your ROI calculation? 

BM: This is the crux of everything. To present data that goes beyond usage, always be asking yourself: What is the value of this content?

There’s no one-single formula for building this type of ROI calculation, but when it comes to ROI of the information center, it’s a no brainer to start where the top revenue generation is within your organization. How do I support those departments? Is my portfolio properly aligned to these top revenue generating areas of the business?

Start by looking at your technical content, business content, your legal content, or any other types of content you around your organization’s patents. This is one starting point to justifying your content investments.

What are the technical hurdles to linking content usage data to organizational data?

BM: There are two massive hurdles here. First, you need to get usage data. Next, you must get internal data. Finally, you must figure out how to marry those two.

Think about the questions first that you want to answer with your data. That will help you figure out what you need to collect.

When it comes to connecting the data, you’ll have to feed it into some sort of analysis space. Excel at the very minimum, a full-fledged database, or a tool like RightFind Business Intelligence.

I want to be able to talk to points that my stakeholders care about, but most times I’m not involved in the ‘behind the scenes’ meetings to know what they actually value today… Where should I start?

BM: Try very hard to be in the meetings where you’re gaining insight about what’s important to the organization. You might need to talk to your manager (who’s hopefully your advocate!) about being more involved in these types of “behind the scenes” conversations.

You can also start by seeking out the folks whose groups are using your content. Schedule a one-on-one, with an invitation that says “Your group is using this content actively. We want it to align with what you’re trying to do. Can we set up some time to discuss it?’

When the meeting happens, bring data about their group to that conversation. Pique their curiosity and make it about their bottom line.

Related Reading: Defending Content Spend: Make Sure You Involve the Right People

Do you have any strategies for continuing relationships outside of the information center throughout the year, not just when it’s budgeting time?

BM: It’s going to require some digging. You must be the active partner – if you’re in a large organization, they might not even know the information center exists. Be on their radar – but don’t waste their time. Make sure your information is brief, to the point, is interesting to them.

I always think of these types of meetings with the question: What is the present that I’m going to give them? What can I leave them with that will be of value?

This data can be presented in the form of a report or a visual presentation. And remember – this isn’t a onetime event. This should happen quarterly, at a minimum, even if it’s only for 15 minutes.

 

Ready to learn more from Britt? Check out the following blog posts:

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Presenting Content Data to Stakeholders? 4 Things to Keep in Mind http://www.copyright.com/blog/presenting-information-center-data-stakeholders/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/presenting-information-center-data-stakeholders/#respond Wed, 03 Jan 2018 16:00:35 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=15237 Once you’ve compiled your content usage, spend and value data, here are a few tactics to keep in mind when presenting visualizations to stakeholders.

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Visualizations enable information managers to deliver data in a clear, succinct, and targeted way. Internal stakeholders, such as senior management, while keen to understand why decisions are made, are largely unfamiliar with the complexity and nuances of the data itself. They want to see the bottom line, net effect of the data. What story is the data telling and how should the business adjust?

This excerpt below from our new white paper, Tell Your Information Center’s ROI Story Through Data Visualizations, highlights a few tactics to keep in mind when presenting visualizations to stakeholders:

Know Your Audience

The first and most important consideration is knowing what your audience cares about. What’s important to your key stakeholder in finance will likely not be of the same importance as it is to your R&D organization. Hone your message, emphasize what is important to each group, and target the message to align with their priorities.

When thinking about your visualization, ask “What exactly does my audience need to know?” From there, you can determine if that information should be presented simply, such as a single bar graph, or in a more complex breakdown that features additional elements.

Tell a Story

A visualization is only as good as the narrative that accompanies it. The best shot at gaining support from your organization’s stakeholders will be if you can present a story that’s both easy to understand and backed by facts.

Think about why this formula works.

  • A narrative, based on your own historical knowledge or intuition can be compelling, but it might not garner trust.
  • A visual on its own won’t be helpful if people can’t easily decipher what the data means.

Make that Story Actionable

Here’s a worst-case scenario. You just presented a data visualization, having spent hours perfecting the visuals. It might look beautiful, but after the presentation, your audience files it away, forgetting its relevance and takeaways.

The end goal is always to have your audience, particularly those unfamiliar with the data, to be able to quickly sum up what action needs to be taken based on what they learned from the data.

To the degree possible, tie your communications to overarching business goals. Ask questions, and rely on your entire organization to ensure you’re providing the best resources possible.

Related: What is Value Data and Why Do Information Managers Need It?

Keep Design Simple

The clearer, more succinct the message, the more memorable it will be. Start by presenting a high-level overview of the most important data and dig into the granular details when necessary.

A data visualization with legends, colors and charts may show the wealth of data at your disposal, but most people in your audience won’t want to spend time analyzing the message. Particularly for an audience seeing the data for the first time, this type of visualization will be overwhelming and ultimately ineffective.

Ready to learn more? Check out:

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3 Things for Information Managers to Keep in Mind for 2018 http://www.copyright.com/blog/3-things-information-managers-2018/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/3-things-information-managers-2018/#respond Wed, 27 Dec 2017 08:28:18 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=15213 Check out three ways to overcome information manager challenges in 2018.

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What were your top challenges managing R&D content and providing information services this year? Every corporate information center is different, but industry trends show a clear pattern of pain points, regardless of company size.

According to Outsell, in 2017, information challenges at the forefront were: taking the reins of data; navigating shifting budgets; and managing smarter tools.

Moving forward, to address these challenges in 2018, here are few things you should keep in mind:

Create a Better Research Access & Search Experience

Publishers, researchers and libraries have relied on IP addresses to authorize content access for many years. But in today’s distributed environment, more effective solutions are needed to facilitate a seamless, intuitive and consistent user experience.

And even when researchers have seamless access to content, with 2.5 million articles being published annually, today’s researchers are tasked with sifting through more content than ever before. When looking for information, researchers need to have confidence they will find the relevant content they seek – fast. Information centers and knowledge managers support this effort– but weeding through irrelevant search results is an ongoing challenge.

To combat these challenges, look out for the tools at your disposal to provide better research experiences. For example, the Resource Access for the 21st Century initiative works to improve user access to subscribed content across a range of content platforms. You can learn more about RA21’s pilot programs in this on-demand webinar, featuring testimonials from GlaxoSmithKline and the American Chemical Society.

Another avenue to explore is semantic enrichment. Look at this white paper, Semantic Enrichment and the Information Manager, to learn how this concept can work across your organization, in areas like early phase research, competitive intelligence, pharmacovigilance and IDMP.

Find a Way to Showcase Your Information Center’s Value

Most information managers face the challenge of content being a target during budget cuts. When internal stakeholders and the C-Suite don’t have enough insight into what the information center does, making the case for content investments becomes more difficult.

There are several ways you can showcase your information center’s value – but data insights need to be at the helm of this strategy. Information managers have been using usage statistics for years to determine what content researchers consider important. While quantitative analytics are extremely important, standalone usage statistics are only the starting point. Data needs to tell a story that goes beyond numbers, and provides a more precise picture of what users are most interested in – and which content supports overarching business initiatives.

Here are a few steps to follow:

  1. First, make sure you are sharing the right data.
  2. Second, make sure you’re involving the right people.
  3. Third, make sure you’re showcasing the information in an easily digestible way, such as through data visualizations.

Turn Information into Knowledge

As corporate libraries evolve, there’s a need to shift from an explicit learning environment to a tacit one. Tacit knowledge, defined as personal and undocumented knowledge that’s dynamically created and experience based, requires information managers to think beyond managing content and move into determining ways to curate and disseminate this information in more consumable ways to help accelerate research.

How can you make changes that will incorporate tacit knowledge alongside traditional information resources? At Shire, Jill Shuman’s advice is to “start simply and begin by adding a series of podcast interviews with [your] scientists, and then perhaps branch out into building communities of practice, where like-minded employees can share best practices within an environment that can be both archived and searched.”

Continued Reading: What’s in a Name? The Library vs. Knowledge Management Center

 

What are your 2018 top goals for your corporate information center? Let us know in the comments below.

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2 Big Takeaways for Information Managers from the 2017 State of BI and Predictive Analytics Report http://www.copyright.com/blog/2-big-takeaways-for-information-managers-from-the-2017-state-of-bi-and-predictive-analytics-report/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/2-big-takeaways-for-information-managers-from-the-2017-state-of-bi-and-predictive-analytics-report/#respond Fri, 29 Sep 2017 07:41:25 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14303 How, when, and why are organizations using business intelligence tools? A look inside Dresner Advisory Services' 2017 Advanced and Predictive Analytics Market Study.

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Before planning the future of your information center, you need to understand the past. While not a crystal ball, predictive analytics help organizations forecast future events by finding patterns and trends in historical data. With this type of information more readily available than ever before, understanding the past has become much easier.

Deciphering how predictive analytics and business intelligence (BI) impact organizations is the subject of a recent report published by Dresner Advisory Services. 2017 Advanced and Predictive Analytics Market Study comprises 90 pages of in-depth market analysis, examining evolving user perceptions and future capabilities.

How, when, and why business intelligence is being used

An article in Forbes identifies key points from this global report, which is based on insights from more than 3,000 organizations. Here’s a look at the takeaways information managers should know, as they look to utilize data to tell their content ROI story.

End-user self-service is a top priority 

When it comes to advanced analytics, perhaps unsurprisingly, BI experts, business analysts, statisticians and data scientists are the most frequent users. Just over 60% of data scientists and statisticians reported using these tools either constantly or often. At the other end of the table, executives and third-party consultants were found to use the technology the least.

Remember: Just because executives aren’t working with BI technology, doesn’t mean they’re not utilizing the data found within it. Many times, information managers must compile and analyze data, and bring forth the most important trends or insights to upper management. In these situations, having a clear understanding of what your stakeholders will want and need to see is critical.

Learn more: Defending Content Spend – Make Sure You Involve the Right People

Reporting capabilities and dashboards are “must-haves”

It’s still early days for many of the technologies driving BI and predictive analytics, but the study revealed that companies are acknowledging their importance for future growth and are investing accordingly.

The top two priorities for enterprises planning to utilize BI data are reporting capabilities and dashboards; 80% of respondents consider these to be “critical” or “very important.” Within dashboards, end users can organize the data they find most valuable, making it easier to showcase to stakeholders and other departments within the organization.

Data mining, data discovery and data storytelling also featured highly, with more than 40% of respondents deeming them as critical or very important.

Additional takeaways:

Scalability: Regarding predictive analytics and business intelligence platforms, in-memory and in-database analytics come out on top, with more than 80% of respondents considering them to be important.

Features of analytics technology: The study also revealed that organizations are basing their BI initiatives on features within the technology. Around 80% of respondents rank regression models, textbook statistical functions, and hierarchical clustering as the most important features. Given less importance are text analytics functions and sentiment analysis (less than 70%), and ensemble learning (less than 60%).

 

As the volume of data continues to grow, so too does investment in advanced analytics tools, data scientists, and their ongoing skills training.

Not sure how analytics could help your information center? See if you can answer the following 5 Questions Every Information Manager Should Be Able To Answer

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Why are Medical Communications Teams Struggling to Manage Content? http://www.copyright.com/blog/medical-communications-teams-struggling-manage-content/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/medical-communications-teams-struggling-manage-content/#respond Tue, 12 Sep 2017 08:43:31 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14160 Do medical communications need an easier way to manage content? Research from Accenture’s The State of Content Survey for Life Sciences suggests yes.

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In the pharmaceutical industry, medical communications professionals work with an enormous amount of content to help educate and respond to inquiries from patients, healthcare providers, administrators, and others. They rely on content to create educational and marketing material for internal and external use with clinical information about their company’s products, including reporting adverse events. What’s more, they are responsible for managing various medical information databases both for drugs in the market and those in development.

But, with all this content at their disposal, are medical communications teams in need of an easier way to manage content? Research from Accenture’s The State of Content Survey for Life Sciences suggests yes.

The study shows 78% of respondents in pharma and biotech and 95% in med tech reporting moderate to enormous amounts of digital content and assets being produced by their organizations – with no indication of that slowing down.

The concerning statistic is this: Only 13% of pharma and biotech marketers and 17% of med tech marketers think they leverage content – both internal and third-party published – well.

What makes content management so difficult?

One challenge to content management is the fact that siloed, localized content makes the authoring process overly time-consuming and difficult to do in a copyright compliant manner.  Many times, a document needs to be created with externally published literature, charts, graphs, mixed in with internal data and information.

And once content is created, the resulting formats are hard to search, have limited reuse potential, and require endless version management. In an era when people want access anytime, anywhere, content also falls short if it cannot be optimized for use on mobile devices or through VPN access.

Related Reading: Mobile’s Role in Information Management and R&D Content

The benefits of a centralized library for communications teams

Companies have acknowledged their need for a centralized place to store and review content. Gartner predicts that investment in IT in the life sciences sector will reach $54 billion by 2019. It’s within this arena that shared libraries and component authoring tools can help.

For corporations with thousands of employees spanning the globe, a centralized, secure editing tool is critical. A library that is easily accessible for content users could offer the means to store, organize and collaborate on published content within teams and across the organization. In addition, by centralizing published materials, life sciences companies can quickly locate the information they need to support patent and regulatory submissions or pharmacovigilance activities.

With centralized libraries, easier collaboration is ingrained into the workflow. With most medical communications departments dealing with vast volumes of content, contributors want to be confident they are editing the most up-to-date version of a document. But with contributors sharing different versions of the same document on their desktops, that becomes a challenge.

Taking shared libraries a step further with component authoring

A component-based approach to content takes the collaborative concept of centralized libraries a step further. It allows information to be organized into chunks which can be used and reused across the business. Component authoring enables sections of a document to be edited and changed automatically in all related documents. Where content updates used to take weeks – or even months – multiple changes can be completed quickly and efficiently.

Today’s medical communications departments are increasingly becoming author and publisher figures within the organization. Utilizing an efficient, copyright compliant process to create content for external distribution is the end goal – with an effective content management workflow, this will become an easier feat.

Content access anytime, anywhere. Explore CCC’s RightFind Solutions.  

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Does Artificial Intelligence Signal the End for Corporate Librarians? [Q&A] http://www.copyright.com/blog/does-artificial-intelligence-signal-the-end-for-corporate-librarians-qa/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/does-artificial-intelligence-signal-the-end-for-corporate-librarians-qa/#respond Tue, 22 Aug 2017 09:18:28 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14002 Ethan Redrup of the Martec Group discusses how artificial intelligence will impact information managers and corporate librarians moving forward.

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Head to a conference in any vertical these days, and you’re guaranteed to find a session around artificial intelligence and its potential to change the industry. A simple Google search of artificial intelligence immediately turns up results that span how AI could impact everything from space systems to art, from marketing to music.

While we’re not sure AI is going to solve every problem known to man, we can all agree that AI has gained momentum since the science of machine learning was introduced back in the 1950s.

Still, alongside the Google search results that discuss how AI will positively reshape the world we currently know, there are equally as many posts discussing the negative implications of AI: Will it destroy jobs? Can we trust it? Earlier this month, Tesla’s CEO Elon Musk called for the regulation of AI, having previously suggested AI could be humanity’s “biggest existential threat.” 

It raises the question that was posed at a session at the Special Library Association’s annual conference in June: Is artificial intelligence just hype? Is this real? And if AI is taking over the world, where does it leave us, humans?

Ethan Redrup, Senior Market Analyst at The Martec Group

We sat down with one of the speakers from the SLA session, Ethan Redrup of the Martec Group, to dig further into how artificial intelligence will impact information managers and corporate librarians moving forward. Here is a look at his thoughts:

CCC: It’s a common worry across industries that artificial intelligence could someday impact job security. Do corporate librarians need to be worrying about this today? 

 

ER: I don’t think embracing AI or not is an option at this point. It is coming, though I think in a less-dramatic fashion than arguments between Zuckerberg and Elon Musk would have you believe.

Job security is an interesting prospect, and it varies by the type of organization you’re with.

If you’re with a large organization that has the resources to implement extensive AI solutions, then AI will be capable of taking over many of your daily tasks. The role of an information professional in that situation needs to adapt and create value through higher-level strategic thinking that AI isn’t (yet?) capable of. If AI can run your searches and return results faster than you can, great! Utilize that and save yourself time to focus on other things, or write up more detailed summaries with strategic implications so that you generate even more value than you did before AI took over some tasks.

At a smaller organization, it will be a different story. Custom AI solutions are extremely resource intensive and probably out of reach for many organizations. They’ll likely experience AI through piecemeal solutions they buy from vendors to automate a few tasks that can be done faster.

Information professionals in this situation will likely find themselves focusing even more on AI than those at larger organizations for two reasons:

  1. They might be the only person in their organizations who have visibility into AI’s functional uses in the info world,
  2. They’ll get left behind in efficiency by larger organizations if they ignore AI.

The only way I see AI threatening job security is if you focus on manual tasks, and more “doing” than “thinking.”

CCC: What’s on the horizon for AI that could be particularly of interest to information professionals? 

 

The newer technologies that have me excited are based on human language, and utilize it in a few different ways.

Computers have never been able to understand human language, and coding was kind of a “gatekeeper” for who could utilize computer systems to their full potential. Not everyone has the time, resources, or aptitude to become a coder.

As we go down the path of teaching computers human language, we can programmatically analyze and categorize content that already exists, and then search for it more humanly. A search process with advanced and integrated Natural Language Processing technology would begin with a standard search request. A question, let’s say “Why did the Roman Empire fall?”, would be posed. Rather than look at a collection of words and try to find them occurring together, this search would understand we’re looking for a detailed explanation (why), about a specific entity (The Roman Empire), and information relating to an event or action (collapse and dissolution). Search engines like this are not that far away, especially as more advanced ones include related terms and synonym searching. The next step is critical – developing a deeper understanding of the available material. Modern search engines get by pretty well here, but still require a person to look through pages of results to find what’s relevant, and try multiple searches on multiple engines to find items that were missed. Search engines that could operate on concepts and entities rather than terms are going to be a huge step in information searching technology.

On the other end, Natural Language Generation is a cool technology that I see being rolled out more and more in the corporate world over the next few years. It is already implemented in limited ways, such as writing news articles for sports scores and corporate financial results, but there is much more to come.

Companies (and governments) have the same problem with their internal information that should be used to make better decisions – no one reads it. Whether it’s time constraints, difficulty accessing the information, or most of a given report being irrelevant, stakeholders are missing out on key insights that they need to make better decisions.

With the above technology having an understanding of internal data, Natural Language Processing will be able to generate customized, natural-sounding reports with just information relevant to a specific person. Picture an automated Twitter feed of operational efficiencies going to a manufacturing engineer, or job market information going to a recruiter, all sounding just as natural as if an analyst took the time to write it. When we look at these customized reports, the irrelevant information being excluded is just as important as relevant information being included.

CCC: Moving forward, how can librarians leverage AI to reach their business goals? 

 

Think about the most boring or repetitive tasks you do, and what you could do instead if those were taken care of for you. My perspective as a competitive intelligence analyst and a market researcher is probably a little different than that of more traditional information professionals, but many of the tasks we do are the same.

One of the biggest AI technologies out there that can help us is summarization. By looking at more than just commonly used words and shifting to techniques like entity identification and using the relationships between words, AI applications have made great strides in summarizing vast amounts of content.

In the data-saturated world we live in, utilizing this aspect of AI can help us spend less time determining what’s relevant and more time using that relevant content to provide value for our organizations. We will be able to respond to more requests for information, provide better and more complete reports on what information exists, and reduce turnaround times all while utilizing the same number of people.

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What’s in a Name? The Library vs. Knowledge Management Center http://www.copyright.com/blog/library-vs-knowledge-management-center/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/library-vs-knowledge-management-center/#respond Tue, 25 Jul 2017 07:12:16 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=13718 How can information professionals incorporate more tacit knowledge alongside traditional information resources? Jill Shuman investigates.

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As head of the library at a large biotech company, I’ve been asked by my administration to determine whether we should change our name from The Library to The Knowledge Management Center. Initially my response was “Of course! That’s what we do. We ‘manage’ the ‘knowledge’ for our colleagues all over the world.”

But then I read an article that changed how I think about the term knowledge management (KM). The article described two different types of knowledge—explicit and tacit.

Librarians are very familiar with explicit knowledge, often referred to as information. This information is typically documented and public, codified, structured, and externalized, such as journal articles and patent data.

Tacit knowledge, however, is defined as personal and undocumented knowledge that is dynamically created and experience based.  This type of knowledge is difficult to write down, visualize, or even pass on from one person to another, because it is intuitive and depends on experience and context.  In our biotech environment, this might include the brainstorming that precedes the search for a new molecular compound or the steps in a complicated manufacturing process.

What Constitutes a Knowledge Management Center?  

Faced with the conundrum of The Library versus The Knowledge Management Center, I took to the Internet for additional insight. I learned that the accepted definition of knowledge management is a process of creating, sharing, and managing both the information AND the knowledge of an organization. A fully built-out knowledge management center incorporates complex methods for curating and disseminating information, as well as sharing ideas and thoughts that enable groups to create opportunities from unexpected connections and new perspectives.

So where does my library stand in this regard?  As I looked through all our holdings, it became clear that the entire corpus of our library is composed of information, with virtually no tacit knowledge at all.  While we are storing, curating, and retrieving many thousands of pieces of information each year, it is still just the explicit type of knowledge. We have not yet developed any solutions for capturing, managing, and distributing the tacit knowledge of our employees.  As a true KM center is a mixture of tacit and explicit elements, we’re not really a knowledge management center….yet.

The state of our Knowledge Management Center (going forward)

My staff and I are always up for a challenge.  All this talk of tacit knowledge has us intrigued.  Most employers will state that their greatest asset is the knowledge of their employees, yet we’re not capturing any of it.

Moving forward throughout 2017 and into 2018, we plan to begin making changes that will incorporate more tacit knowledge alongside our traditional information resources.  We will start simply and begin by adding a series of podcast interviews with our scientists, and then perhaps branch out into building communities of practice, where like-minded employees can share best practices within an environment that can be both archived and searched.

There will be bumps and hurdles as we take these new steps forward.   But as a library trying to stay relevant and meet the objectives of our company, we’re willing to give this new strategy a shot.  After all, who better to promote lifelong learning than the Library—no matter what we’re called?

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What Types of Usage Data do Information Managers Actually Want? [Research] http://www.copyright.com/blog/usage-data-information-managers-want-research/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/usage-data-information-managers-want-research/#respond Wed, 28 Jun 2017 15:53:39 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=13558 New research from Outsell suggests standalone content usage statistics are not enough. Here's what information managers actually want from usage data.

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A new survey from research and advisory firm, Outsell, Inc., highlights the importance of frequent and detailed usage data for information managers in order to show the value of content spend.

The research – a combination of responses from current and former members of Outsell’s information management community, feedback from information managers, and industry analysis – confirms the value of usage data in supporting R&D, product innovation, and competitive advantage.

Content that’s worth the spend

Most information managers are tasked with proving that high cost content is worth the expense. According to the survey, collecting comprehensive usage data on a regular basis is crucial for many information managers because it offers real insight into what content is worth the investment. Respondents noted that not only does usage data demonstrate the specific value of subscriptions, it also allows them to accurately allocate charges within the organization.

Respondents were clear about what they want to do with usage information. For example, they need to be able to:

  • Convert data into visuals
  • Compare different pricing models
  • Access statistics that are in a useable format (i.e. electronic)

What information managers are looking for in usage data

It’s vital for information managers to understand the extent to which content is being used and by whom. To this end, respondents want to see COUNTER-compliant statistics demonstrating:

  • Downloads, searches, and views broken down by specific users, location, and by journal
  • Number of hits, downloads, and prints
  • Usage by date, broken down by month, quarter, and year
  • Patterns and trends

All of these metrics fall into what we at CCC like to call ‘measures that matter’ – measures that can be used to provide clarity around the content your employees are using.

Related Reading: Defending Content Spend 101: Make Sure You Involve the Right People 

Current challenges

According to some survey respondents, standalone usage statistics are not enough. The data needs to tell a story that goes beyond numbers, and provide a more precise picture of what content users are most interested in.

Information managers continue to look for even more data that can be used to help them better understand their clients, how they interact with the products they license, and how the content fits into their workflows.

The strategic solution

In an environment of declining or flat budgets and rising content costs, information managers need to monitor content use and demonstrate the ROI of their subscriptions. Usage and value statistics help information managers meet the information needs of their end users and show the strategic business value of content to their organization.

RightFind® Business Intelligence helps information managers gain insights on content usage and justify their content spend. Data is presented in a way that is quickly understood by senior management, resulting in increased visibility of information services and the strategic value of content. Learn more about it here.

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Latest Happenings from Resource Access for the 21st Century (RA21) http://www.copyright.com/blog/latest-happenings-resource-access-21st-century-ra21/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/latest-happenings-resource-access-21st-century-ra21/#respond Tue, 27 Jun 2017 15:57:48 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=13542 What's in store for the future of RA21? Jenny Walker shares the updates on the program's three pilot initiatives.

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Publishers, researchers and libraries have relied on IP addresses to authorize content access for many years; but in today’s distributed environment, more effective solutions are needed to facilitate a seamless, intuitive and consistent user experience.

Single sign-on can significantly reduce the administrative burden on institutions and remove barriers to resource access.

For the consumers of scholarly resources, easy access is critical regardless of workflow, device or location.  The underlying assumptions that led to the implementation of IP access are no longer valid; devices are not tied to one location and the user does not typically start their research at the company or institutional portal.

Introducing Resource Access for the 21st Century (RA21)

Publishers, libraries and other interested parties (like CCC) have come together in a recent initiative, Resource Access for the 21st Century (RA21), to work towards improved user access to subscribed content across a range of content platforms. RA21 is a joint initiative of STM and NISO.

Three RA21 pilot programs underway

Three pilot programs are currently underway—one focused on the business environment and two on the academic environment.

All three RA21 pilots propose the use of Federated Identity Management (FID) based on Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) technology. SAML is an established standard for exchanging user authentication and authorization data.

A key aspect of this approach is the focus on the user’s identity rather than on their location. Regardless of whether the user starts their search at a publisher site or in Google Scholar, they are authenticated only when they need to access subscribed content. When users attempt to access a resource, it is their organization that authenticates them; and it does so by vouching for the user’s identity, whose personal information and credentials remains by default with their organization, thus preserving privacy. Single sign-on, through this use of only one username and password to access resources across different platforms, applications and locations, can significantly reduce the administrative burden on institutions and remove barriers to access.

Get more information on these pilot programs here.

The Corporate Pilot

The corporate pilot is now well underway and involves five pharmaceutical companies, all members of the Pharma Documentation Ring (P-D-R) and four large STM publishers. In May 2016, the P-D-R set out their requirements for authentication systems beyond IP. The corporate pilot seeks to address these and to demonstrate how the use of P-D-R companies’ corporate login credentials can be leveraged to provide the same type of seamless access to scholarly resources that today’s IP address authentication provides.

This pilot focuses on providing seamless access to publisher resources by authorized users using desktop or mobile devices outside the corporate network. These are the users who typically experience immense frustration from the long-winded login processes currently in place; we need to find a way of making that experience outside the corporate network as easy as it is from within it.

What’s in store for the future of RA21?

RA21 will not build a specific technical solution or industry-wide authentication platform. Rather, it aims to recommend new authentication solutions and explain the measures that stakeholders should undertake to implement them.

The pilots are due to be complete before the end of the year; after which work will begin on recommendations for best practices. If you are interested in receiving updates on RA21 developments, please complete the contact form.

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How Information Managers Can Explain Usage Data Through Visualizations http://www.copyright.com/blog/information-managers-usage-data-visualizations/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/information-managers-usage-data-visualizations/#respond Wed, 31 May 2017 17:32:53 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=13145 Defending your content spend can be difficult. Data visualization helps information managers transform usage data into a clear, engaging story. 

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On its own, data is a series of facts and statistical information. Although data surrounds us, without context, it can be hard to draw any insights about what story the data is telling. Add visualization to that data, however, and it can be transformed into a clear, precise story with actionable insights.

Transforming data into more engaging, intuitive, and valuable information is growing in importance for information managers, as our need to convey progressively complex numbers and ideas increases.

Why visuals?

The power of data visualization lies in how we process information. Marcel Just, director of the Center for Cognitive Brain Imaging at Carnegie Mellon University, summarized the importance of data visualization in a Nieman Reports article. In it, he explains that humans take on information in a visual way, meaning the more visual the information, the more useable, interactive, and accessible it becomes.

“The printed word is a human artifact,” Just said. “It’s very convenient and it’s worked very well for us for 5,000 years, but it’s an invention of human beings. By contrast Mother Nature has built into our brain our ability to see the visual world and interpret it. Even the spoken language is much more a given biologically than reading written language.”

Tell stakeholders an engaging story through visuals

In the current budget climate, information managers are balancing static or declining content budgets with rising content costs. This is a challenge as they must continue provide the high-quality content their organization relies on to remain competitive.

Creating a robust information center that’s backed by strategic data is not easy, but it can be a way to ensure the organization understands the value of the information center and the resources it provides to researchers.

The challenge begins with access. Data for subscribed content and document delivery is often located in disparate sources (think publisher platforms, document delivery platforms and internal systems.) Then, the task of normalizing that data and presenting it in a unified view takes time and effort.

Once that data is compiled, an Excel spreadsheet crammed with lines of numbers may be useful to information managers, but most stakeholders want their information quickly and to-the-point.

The more interesting and compelling usage data is, the easier it will be to share with stakeholders who, while keen to understand why decisions are made, are largely unfamiliar with the complexity and nuances of the data itself. Visualizations can allow for a clear, succinct, and targeted message.

Britt Mueller shares the importance of this, here:

“Having influential stakeholders who are willing to talk about the value and importance of content is an extremely valuable way to justify spending. These people are vouching for the need as outsiders of the actual information function, and that can lend credibility and insight into the actual use of the content.” 

The data-driven information manager

As more organizations recognize the benefits of data visualization – less time spent creating reports, greater collaboration, better customer interaction, and a greater competitive edge – the more insight and ROI they gain. Because when it comes to visualization, just like the data, the opportunities are endless.

With RightFind Business Intelligence, the content usage, spend, and value analytics module for RightFind, you can quickly and easily create data visualizations and presentations to let the data tell your content ROI story.

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