Digital Transformation – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com Rights Licensing Expert Fri, 14 Dec 2018 16:33:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.copyright.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/cropped-ccc-favicon-32x32.png Digital Transformation – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com 32 32 Let Minimum Viable Metadata Maximize Your Content ROI http://www.copyright.com/blog/let-minimum-viable-metadata-maximize-your-content-roi/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/let-minimum-viable-metadata-maximize-your-content-roi/#respond Thu, 13 Dec 2018 08:00:47 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=18223 Work smarter by defining the Minimal Viable Metadata for your organization’s content: the bare minimum information required to describe each element.

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I was once offered a genuinely unique archive comprised of tens of thousands of hours of educationally-focused video footage from a world-leading broadcaster and spanning 50 years for just £1.

Why was I presented with this seemingly ‘too-good-to-be-true’ offer? Because despite the archive being potentially extremely valuable (many would argue invaluable), its net worth to the owner was effectively zero, due to one crucial detail — lack of metadata.

metadata
/ˈmɛtədeɪtə/
noun
1. a set of data that describes and gives information about other data*.
(*The data being described can also be referred to as content)

In this instance, the video footage content lacked sufficient data to describe the subject matter contained within the footage (the actual contents), the rights associated with it, the products it touched (usage), age, version history, etc. This sort of information typifies the metadata that any organization needs in order to leverage their existing content in a meaningful way.

“What’s the problem? Now that we know what we need to store as metadata against the content, we can just go back and add it, right?”

The ultimate answer to that question is driven by establishing the return on investment; retrospectively adding the required metadata will involve effort (and therefore a cost), be it manual, assisted or even fully-automated, and the size of the effort will be impacted by many factors.

The video archive spanned 50 years, so even establishing some basic (by modern standards) metadata may well have proven too hard and therefore too expensive to generate any kind of ROI, hence the £1 offer.

Dr. Alexander Wissner-Gross, an award-winning computer scientist, inventor, and author, defined intelligence as “a force to maximize future freedom of action.” His point was that the more intelligence something has, the more likely it is to succeed via the availability of choice.

Well-described content — content that might be referred to as ‘intelligent,’ ‘semantically-enriched,’ or ‘smart’ — maximizes the potential to exploit future opportunities, known and unknown, and therefore maximizes the potential ROI. Therefore, it makes sense that the earlier in its lifecycle that a piece of content is embedded with intelligence via metadata, the greater the freedom of action that content will have in the future.

Minimum Viable Metadata figure 1

Fig. 1. Content’s ability to exploit future opportunities is maximized by embedding intelligent metadata at the earliest opportunity (typically at the point of content creation).

For the past few years, I’ve worked with dozens of companies around the world to help them with their strategic content workflow and knowledge management initiatives. I encourage my clients to begin by defining the Minimal Viable Metadata, or MVM, for their organization’s content. This is the set of bare minimum information used to describe each element of content. The MVM will most likely reflect a mix of external factors, such as the market verticals in which the organization operates, compliance requirements (e.g., industry standards, government policy), as well as internal factors, such as the organization’s content strategy, subject matter expertise, IT systems, etc. Once established, the MVM will allow an organization to unlock the potential of their content, both internally and externally.

In a recent client engagement, I was reminded of the £1 offer I received years ago. In the case of this new client, the lack of video metadata resulted in production slow-downs, process bottlenecks, and single points-of-failure, all of which was holding the organization back from fully exploiting the value of its extensive video content. We quickly established an MVM model and got to work. I analyzed all the content and data associated with the footage and quickly saw the potential quantifiable benefits by taking the subtitle script file (there was one present for every video), mining it for predetermined terms, and then indexing the results against each video asset.

My client now had the potential power to turn tens of thousands of hours of video footage into a fully searchable resource for the entire organization to utilize, whereas previously, the knowledge about what was contained within the videos was locked away in the brains of two people. With an MVM in place, the client could accelerate production timelines, reduce and eliminate bottlenecks, and find new ways to drive revenue and cut costs associated with their video content.

Now, where did I put that £1?

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Building Bridges to Knowledge: From the Minds of Content Creators to the Minds of Users [Upcoming Webinar] http://www.copyright.com/blog/building-bridges-to-knowledge-from-the-minds-of-content-creators-to-the-minds-of-users-upcoming-webinar/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/building-bridges-to-knowledge-from-the-minds-of-content-creators-to-the-minds-of-users-upcoming-webinar/#respond Thu, 06 Dec 2018 08:00:16 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=18186 Join Kiren Shoman (Editorial Director, SAGE Publishing) on 12 December for a live discussion on digital transformation in academic publishing.

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Digital transformation isn’t a switch but an evolutionary, incremental process, a journey shaped both by strategic goals and customer need and demand. It’s precisely that customer demand that SAGE Publishing responded to when they developed and launched their SAGE Video series.

Join CCC and Kiren Shoman (Editorial Director, SAGE Publishing) on Wednesday, 12 December at 10:00 a.m. EST for a discussion on the evolutionary nature of digital transformation in academic publishing, staying true to SAGE’s mission, and how technology plays a supporting role in helping SAGE transfer ideas from the minds of the content creators to the minds of users. Kiren will also highlight their work in developing their SAGE Video portfolio to the market alongside textbooks to support diverse research and learning needs of students and researchers across disciplines, course levels and geographical location.

Register Now

Suggested Reading

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Can’t-Miss Sessions at STM Week 2018 http://www.copyright.com/blog/cant-miss-sessions-at-stm-week-2018/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/cant-miss-sessions-at-stm-week-2018/#respond Thu, 29 Nov 2018 08:30:16 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=18160 Browse our top picks from the STM Week 2018 agenda, including sessions led by CCC’s Chuck Hemenway on Plan S and Babis Marmanis on AI.

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Join us in London for STM Week 2018 from 4 to 6 December. This year’s agenda boasts vital topics and expert speakers unified by the theme Processes, Products and People in Publishing. Read on for our top picks from the packed schedule, including sessions led by CCC’s Chuck Hemenway and Babis Marmanis.

Day 1: Tools & Standards – Collaboration, standardization and consolidation

January 2020: A Call for Unity?

Moderated by: Chuck Hemenway, Director Business Development, Copyright Clearance Center

Panelists include:

  • Will Schweitzer, Director, Product & Custom Publishing, AAAS
  • Tasha Mellins-Cohen, Director of Publishing, Microbiology Society
  • Ian Potter, Solutions Specialist, Publishing & Associations, Clarivate Analytics
  • Rob Johnson, Director, Research Consulting Limited

The dynamic Open Access environment presents many challenges to longstanding practices in scholarly research publishing, particularly from funders, whether public or private. In the EU, government agencies are pushing the so-called Plan S principles, even while in the UK, Wellcome Trust considers further revisions to its funding and publishing guidelines.

What lies ahead for OA and how should publishers respond? What kinds of partnerships for publishers with other industry stakeholders are likely to yield a “win-win-win” scenario for researchers, funders, institutions and the public? This expert panel will explore the state of publisher commitment and investment in OA infrastructure and workflow, as well as consider how adoption of partnerships, tools, and standards could address any impasses, perceived or real.

Day 2: Innovation – Open Science and the protection of excellence

Industry Update, dedicated to Karen Hunter (1945-2018)

Moderated by: Gerry Grenier, Senior Director of Content Management, IEEE

STM Industry Report: Innovations in the Publishing Universe

Michael Mabe, CEO, International Association of STM Publishers

Rob Johnson, Director, Research Consulting

Johnson and Mabe, lead-authors of the new STM Industry Report, its special edition launched at STM’s 50th anniversary celebration in Frankfurt, will provide an overview of the current state of the STM Publishing universe, including the importance and impact of the latest developments in technology and innovation.

Digital Humanities and Open Science – A Librarian’s Perspective

Overview and introduction by Liam O’Dwyer, Special Collections and Digital Humanities Librarian, Dublin City University

A brief overview of Digital Humanities (DH) and its relationship with ‘traditional’ humanities. A snapshot at the DH landscape, method and praxis, the role of libraries, and implications for open science and publishing in the field. What are the current challenges and tensions? What roles and approaches are emerging?

Searching for images in the era of deep learning

Babis Marmanis, CTO, Copyright Clearance Center

AI and machine learning have the potential to radically speed up operations and increase the efficiency of the STM publishing sector. Existing AI-based technologies have already been developed or acquired by publishers to assist with the identification of peer reviewers, identify and combat plagiarism, recognize fabricated data, bolster the decision-making process behind the acceptance and rejection of papers. Likewise, AI has the potential to offer brand new services to researchers and the research community to empower Open Science and open knowledge creation. Come and listen to what is available now and what vendors have on offer and are developing for smarter information applications.

Day 3: Diversity and Inclusion in Publishing

Science benefits from diversity

Elisa De Ranieri, Editor-in-Chief Nature Communications, Springer Nature (effective January 2019)

For publishers, action on diversity and inclusion can’t begin and end with our own internal processes.  There is an imperative for us to find ways to address any problem that is standing in the way of great research. Find out about how Springer Nature is working with the academic community to increase representations of diversity in the scholarly work they publish, and how internal diversity program also play their part. What actions can the scholarly publishing industry take, together, to help drive change more quickly?

Follow all of the activity from STM Week 2018 at #STMWeek with @copyrightclear.

Related Reading:

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Join CCC at AWS re:Invent 2018 http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-at-aws-reinvent-2018/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-at-aws-reinvent-2018/#respond Tue, 20 Nov 2018 06:48:50 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=18075 Together with our partner Alfresco, we will be at Quad Expo #330 from November 26-30 for one of the most important global cloud computing events of the year.

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From November 26 to 30, the CCC team will be at AWS re:Invent 2018 in Las Vegas, NV, the world’s largest global cloud computing conference.

CCC will be there with our partner Alfresco, an enterprise open-source software company focused on driving the convergence of Enterprise Content Management (ECM) and Business Process Management (BPM) to advance the flow of digital business. More than 1,800 companies in 195 countries rely on Alfresco, including leaders in FSI, healthcare, and public sector. Learn more about Alfresco’s presence at AWS re:Invent 2018 here.

Visit CCC in the Quad Expo (#330), located at Aria Resort & Casino – Level 1, at the AWS Marketplace and Service Catalog Experience Hub.  On Tuesday, November 27 at 12 PM, my colleague Tom Morris, senior director of engineering and I will be answering questions  in the booth on topics including the impact of the cloud on our customers, use cases for migrating to the cloud, Containers and Kubernetes, the impact to business infrastructure and more.

If you can’t be there in person, the interview will be live-streamed on Alfresco’s Facebook page.

Stay in touch throughout the event with @copyrightclear using the hashtags #AWS and #AlfrescoReinvent.

Recommended Reading

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On the Road to Intelligent Content http://www.copyright.com/blog/on-the-road-to-intelligent-content/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/on-the-road-to-intelligent-content/#respond Thu, 01 Nov 2018 21:17:03 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=17913 Publishers have long dreamed of easily repurposing their catalogs for markets around the world, but creating intelligent content is no simple task.

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Publishers have long dreamed of quickly and easily repurposing their catalogs for markets around the world. Transforming content, however, is no simple task. Some intelligence is required.

Dr. Alex Wissner-Gross, a fellow at the Institute for Applied Computational Science at Harvard University, has defined intelligence as a force to maximize future freedom of action. Intelligent content, therefore, strives to maximize its potential for the futures ahead, known and unknown. The earlier that content is embedded with intelligence, the more freedom of action it will have in the future.

The key point of intelligent content is that it’s about the relationships and metadata that are held together within a piece of content. The content is decorated with metadata around it and has relationships to other content. That ultimately makes it easier to query that data and bring that intelligence together. Somebody said intelligence is about making connections. It’s really that point of connecting that content using semantic enrichment to leverage the intelligence that’s there within those relationships, so you can find stuff that you didn’t know you were looking for.

The key point of intelligent content is that it’s about the relationships and metadata that are held together within a piece of content. You want to leverage the intelligence that’s there within those relationships, so you can find stuff that you didn’t know you were looking for.

View the full transcript here.

Recommended Reading:

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Join us at the 2018 Frankfurt Book Fair http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-us-at-the-2018-frankfurt-book-fair/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-us-at-the-2018-frankfurt-book-fair/#respond Thu, 04 Oct 2018 17:57:31 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=17561 We'll be on the floor at Hall 4.2 Stand E18 and on the stage discussing Open Access Plan S, copyright and digital trends at the 2018 Frankfurt Book Fair.

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This year at the fair, CCC will help shine a spotlight on the market pressures driving the publishing industry, including big data, open access, research, technological innovation and copyright.

The Frankfurt Book Fair is known for hosting some of the most thought-provoking and exciting conversations about the world of publishing and this year is no different. We’re thrilled to once again be a key part of discussions around the technology and trends that continue to shape our industry and lead us into the future.

Exhibit Hall

CCC’s booth at the Book Fair is in Hall 4.2 Stand E18. For more information, visit www.copyright.com/frankfurt2018.

Follow the Conversation

Join us on social media using the official event hashtag #FBM18, and for all CCC news follow #FBM18CCC.

Presence on Stage

Getting on the Road to Intelligent Content: No Time Like the Present
Wednesday, 10 October, 11:30 -12:00
Location: Education Stage (Hall 4.2 C 94)

Agile workflows and easy access to targeted, relevant content have obvious benefits for publishers who have long dreamed of repurposing their catalogs for markets around the world. Transforming content to become “intelligent,” however, is no easy task. In this presentation, Carl Robinson, Head of Consulting, Ixxus, and Renee Swank, Senior Director, Sales, Ixxus, will propose a pragmatic, sensible approach to making the most of technologies without significant upfront investment.

Publisher Voices Raised For Copyright
Wednesday, 10 October, 14:30 – 15:00
Location: Academic & Business Information Stage (Hall 4.2 N 101)

A conversation between Michael Healy and Michiel Kolman, President of the International Publishers Association, will address some of the publishing industry’s most pressing questions, including: What are publishers doing to ensure their voices are being heard in Europe, Asia, North America and elsewhere? Who is helping publishers to defend their business and creative interests? How can you make certain your voice gets heard?

Open Access Monographs
Wednesday, 10 October, 15:30 – 16:00
Location: Education Stage (Hall 4.2 C 94)

Open Access is transforming scholarly journal publishing, yet the looming size of the journal ecosystem has thrown into deep shadow an equally remarkable transformation in scholarly books. This panel discussion featuring Brian O’Leary, Executive Director, Book Industry Study Group, Carl Robinson, Head of Consulting, Ixxus and David Worlock, Publishing Analyst and Co-Chair of Outsell’s Leadership Programs, will discuss the viability, models and the unique needs of OA books compared to OA journals.

Get Smart About “Plan S”

Thursday, 11 October, 09:00 – 09:30
Location: Academic & Business Information Stage (Hall 4.2 N 101)

“Plan S” was announced just weeks ago and now everyone in scholarly publishing will talk about it at Frankfurt Book Fair. An initiative of 11 European national research funding organisations, “Plan S” puts pressure on Open Access publishing business models by capping article fees, ending embargoes and withdrawing support for “hybrid” OA journals. A panel of publishing leaders and expert analysts offers insights to help prepare for “Plan S” and get smart about the next wave of change in Open Access publishing, featuring Tim Britton, Managing Director, Open Research Group at Springer Nature, and others.

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Digital Transformation Must-Reads – Summer 2018 http://www.copyright.com/blog/digital-transformation-must-reads-summer-2018/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/digital-transformation-must-reads-summer-2018/#respond Thu, 20 Sep 2018 05:12:55 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=17383 Together with Alfresco, CCC is excited to share the 2018 Summer edition of the “Digital Transformation Must-Reads” series – a thoughtfully curated selection of important articles, webinars and podcasts.

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Together with Alfresco, CCC is excited to share the 2018 Summer edition of the “Digital Transformation Must-Reads” series – a thoughtfully curated selection of important articles, webinars and podcasts. These topics from the past few months covering critical issues, developments and trends in publishing as the industry continues to transform and evolve through technological advances and practices enabling experimentation between content-rich publishers and eager consumers.

Breaking the Print Model in Digital Delivery [webinar replay]

via SSP

Despite interest in the ‘article of the future,’ users still tend to prefer downloading PDF versions. But is this behavior beginning to change? In this webinar, learn how some publishers are taking advantage of the digital medium to deliver greater value to their users.

The Global Battle for Attention and Authority – Have We Already Lost?

via The Scholarly Kitchen

As a society, are we too eager to welcome technology and its conveniences without consideration of the long-term costs? That’s the question explored in this interview with Siva Vaidhyanathan, Robertson Professor of Media Studies at the University of Virginia.

Mexican Booksellers and Digital Sales Infrastructure: Managing Metadata

via Publishing Perspectives

How can booksellers survive in the era of digital reading and online retail? This article recaps a discussion at CONTEC Mexico, where panelists promoted the use of digital services that can support the sales environment for book retailers.

When it comes to innovation, try thinking small

via The Bookseller

Here at CCC, we talk a lot about becoming digital as a combination of people, process and technology. In this article, Molly Flatt focuses on the “people” aspect of the process. “To innovate, create meaningful work, and remain sane and empathetic in the process, we don’t just need to understand the tsunami of new digital platforms,” she says. “We need to be able to manage the overload of demands those platforms have brought us, and reclaim some creative headspace.”

How Publishers can Engineer Higher Readership Per Article

via Publishing Executive

Those of us who work in digital publishing know creating content to post online is only one piece of the puzzle – getting eyes on that content is another challenge. This article describes how Ebner Publishing looked at its content strategy, and revamped it so more eyes see more articles. The result? Readership has never been higher, including print, online, newsletters, events and social media.

Publishers Partnerships: B2B Solutions in Digital Transformation [podcast] 

via DigiPub

Meeting readers where they want to experience content is one aspect of publishing’s “digital transformation.” In this episode, DigiPub host Sue Brown talks with Ixxus’ Steffanie Ness about specific steps publishers can take to achieve digital transformation — and satisfy the need for product innovation while achieving operational savings.

 

Interested in seeing CCC’s take on digital transformation? Check out these recent posts:

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Digital Transformation Accelerators for Content Reuse http://www.copyright.com/blog/digital-transformation-accelerators-content-reuse/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/digital-transformation-accelerators-content-reuse/#respond Thu, 28 Jun 2018 08:00:14 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16825 Forward-thinking editors demand freedom to reuse and repurpose content in innovative, high value ways, especially on mobile devices.

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Even well into the digital age, publishers have persisted in maintaining processes that confine their businesses to a specific format (usually, the book) and to a single business model. Forward-thinking editors, however, demand freedom to reuse and repurpose content in innovative, high-value ways, especially on mobile devices.

At BookExpo America in May 2018, a panel discussion – The Content Liberation Movement – identified the digital transformation accelerators that can help editors and executives break down the barriers. Featured guests were Ganessan Paramanathan, who serves as Evangelist and Solutions Architect at Alfresco, an enterprise open-source software company focused on driving the convergence of Enterprise Content Management (ECM) and Business Process Management (BPM) to advance the flow of digital business; Maxwell Riggsbee, the co-founder and Chief Product Officer at Gadget Software, a virtual publishing technology that atomizes, enhances and streams book, manual and journal content to smartphones; and Renee Swank, Sr. Director, Copyright Clearance Center.

The Content Liberation Movement

Read the transcript here.

Highlights:

Maxwell Riggsbee, co-founder and Chief Product Officer at Gadget Software: The mobile device, whether it’s tablet or whether it’s phone, right? It’s touch-driven. It’s driven by a completely different set of expectations. And what’s beginning to happen is folks are beginning to ask questions around the data that they want to use, but also at times where they want that data to be accessed.

I’ll give you an example. One of the largest requests that we’re getting is can you take a publication and make it only available in a certain location? So maybe I have someone that’s working in a nuclear facility, but I don’t want certain book-related information available if they’re outside of the geography of that place. That’s data, actually. I mean, I have to now have some information that informs the publication that you’re in a place where you actually can’t render this as something that’s visible, alongside other pieces of information that might be critical to some decision – you used that term a little while ago – some decision I now need to make at this particular point in time under these scenarios. So what we’re seeing is an intersection of information from a variety of sources. You hear the term IoT. That’s informing some of that.

Renee Swank, Sr. Director, Copyright Clearance Center: I work with a lot of publishers, and they have big capabilities that they’re putting on their digital platforms in terms of creating new ways of exploring their content and being able to search and things like that. But it’s really burdened by the old ways of continuing to publish in a very print-based workflow – still creating print first, focused on print-first review processes and content creation process, thinking about their content very linearly, and creating front-to-back books.

I think that gets in the way of being able to open and liberate your content to that kind of capability that Maxwell was talking about, where you contextualize your content, where you can allow people to search in different ways. As your study had shown, people can’t find the information that they’re looking for when it’s buried down in a very deep part of the book. It’s just not really made for the mobile devices that we’re starting to see people use, especially in research and that kind of content.

So I think one of the things that is important to do is start to break the way that people start to create their content, so they’re thinking about how their content can be explored and used in different ways on the platforms that they’re developing today and any new platforms that are going to be coming in the future. So it’s really about looking at that process – editorial process – and looking at, instead of creating a front-to-back book – front-to-back set of content that’s really about a particular product – it’s more creating more granular pieces of content that can be mixed and matched and enriched that devices, whether that might be a web platform or a mobile device, can explore that content in new ways.

Perhaps an end user may want to mix and match that content to create their own books. Maybe it’s contextualized based on where they’re at. So I think that it’s about starting upstream in an editorial process in order to create content agility and giving those end platforms a way to create new user experiences.

Ganessan Paramanathan, who serves as Evangelist and Solutions Architect at Alfresco: …The context is really important. I call them as – think about it as content is your muscle. Context is going to be your nutrition – you got to feed the muscle and enrich your muscle. So we are seeing a huge trend, as Renee mentioned – context is going to be really critical to (inaudible) nutrition and feed your muscle.

And then, at Alfresco, what we have done is we created a common platform to capture your – I call them as learning objects. As Renee mentioned, so you have the ability to create as a granular chunk – be agile on how you create the content. As you have that information, keep it as a small, small granular chunk of content. Capture that. And also have a common – I call them as a digital process layer, not as a one digital publishing pipeline for print, another publishing pipeline for print – instead of having two separate pipeline, think about it as having a common digital workflow to manage the print and also to manage the digital version as well. Have the common model. And then have that publishing framework irrespective of your multichannel, omnichannel experience, and don’t think about – don’t hang up on your format. Have flexible on your format but just work on your common model. And then at Alfresco, the downstream – we take care of that publishing into your omnichannel experience and everything.

Also, at the downstream, once you go further, we can put that artificial intelligence and machine learning into that on how do you repurpose your content which you already have? Let’s say you are creating a different version for a different culture or a different set of audience. Use your machine learn and let the machine learn automatically create the skeleton based on repurpose the content from there and then publish it to the downstream and also – take an example of a translation – use some of the artificial intelligence and the machine learning to create that different language version of the content. And again, don’t hang up of your format. Just think out of the box.

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How to Achieve Digital Dexterity: 4 Elements of Focus http://www.copyright.com/blog/what-is-digital-dexterity/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/what-is-digital-dexterity/#respond Tue, 12 Jun 2018 06:34:31 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16700 Most large companies are not known for being nimble and agile. So how can these organizations develop the dexterity to compete in today's digital age?

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The term “digital transformation” is in vogue as many organizations turn to digital technologies to re-invent their customer experiences, improve internal operations, or build new businesses. Leaders must consider new options for how to organize, as well as how to operate or what to produce, to truly maximize the benefits of their digital tools and capabilities.

Digital initiatives to improve business operations or the customer experience, for example, can trigger major organizational design changes, such as reorganizing departments and assigning new responsibilities. And, while jobs can be replaced, and new skills can be acquired, these efforts are neither fast nor easy.  Moreover, as technologies continue to advance, leaders may find themselves in the same predicament one year or even one month after adopting new technologies, needing to adjust organizational design repeatedly to meet strategic goals.

Long-lasting digital transformation advantages come only from developing the dexterity to rapidly and continuously self-organize apace with advancing digital technologies.

Developing Dexterity to Compete in a Digital Age

Digital dexterity is the sustained organizational capability to fluidly and dynamically reconfigure and deploy both human and digital resources at the speed of rapidly changing technological and market conditions. Digital dexterity comes not just from technology, but from people using digital technologies to think, act, and organize themselves in new and productive ways.

Digital dexterity comes not just from technology, but from people using digital technologies to think, act, and organize themselves in new and productive ways.

Most large companies are not known for being nimble and agile. So how can these organizations develop the digital dexterity to compete in this age? Alongside my colleagues at MIT, we conducted a multi-method study to investigate the experience of digital transformation from an organizational perspective. As part of this research, we surveyed 299 professionals, managers and higher-level representatives in 146 organizations operating in multiple industries and in over 30 countries. This research revealed not one single practice, but rather four interrelated characteristics, that position organizations to respond with digital dexterity to successive waves of future innovation over the long term.

1. A Digital Mindset

A digital mindset is an attitude reflecting a tendency to seek out digital solutions, use technology as a tool for competitive advantage, and approach enterprise data in a systematic fashion for customers, partners, and employees. When employees and managers instinctively turn to their digital tools and data to improve processes or create new products, they reap the benefits of speed and connectedness more often.

Our survey results showed that the presence of a digital mindset is significantly and positively associated with digital dexterity. Organizations in our dataset with the highest levels of digital dexterity exhibited, on average, measures of digital mindsets that were 12% higher than organizations with average levels of digital dexterity, and 30% higher than organizations displaying the lowest level of digital dexterity.

People with digital mindsets aspire to innovate with technology, believe their aspirations are attainable, and actively experiment with digital solutions. As they experience and publicize success with these solutions, favorable attitudes start to cascade through the larger organization. New mindsets inform subsequent decisions and practices.

For instance, leaders may invest more in data quality or in gathering additional data. They also may try to develop stronger analytical capabilities or expand their workforce with specialized or complementary skillsets.

2. Key Digital Practices

Many organizations are starting to digitize their operations. But what really makes a difference regarding digital dexterity is the degree to which organizations subsequently engage in collaborative learning and data-driven decision-making.

  • Collaborative learning involves teamwork and partnering without regard to discipline, geography, ownership or other traditional parameters, and ensures that insights and solutions move rapidly and readily across boundaries.
  • Data-driven decision-making means consistently using data – rather than intuition or the highest paid person’s opinion (“HiPPO”) — to guide decisions.

From our survey, we found both data-driven decision-making and collaborative learning are positively associated with digital dexterity. Organizations in our dataset with the highest levels of digital dexterity recorded, on average, collaborative learning measures that were 17% higher than organizations with average levels of digital dexterity and 46% higher than organizations displaying the lowest level of digital dexterity. Similarly, high dexterity organizations showed data-driven decision-making measures that were 18% higher than average dexterity organizations and 50% higher than the lowest dexterity organizations.

Our case research points to the valuable role of collaborative learning in helping traditional companies cultivate favorable attitudes and beliefs about digital transformation throughout their organizations. Once in place, these shared mindsets, along with shared norms of using data and dispersing knowledge, facilitate receptiveness to flexible and fluid ways of working—unhindered by differences in expertise, role, status or affiliation.

3. An Entrepreneurial and Engaged Workforce

As routine and well-bounded tasks become automated, the remaining roles for the workforce become more creative, open-ended and non-routine.  Our survey found that key success characteristics of this workforce include technology experience, and digital skills, but particularly high engagement. Engagement is evident in competence, motivation and self-direction.

Our survey revealed that many organizations believe they have the necessary technical experience. However, organizations with high levels of digital dexterity are far ahead on digital skills (24% higher than average dexterity organizations; 54% higher than lowest level dexterity organizations) and engagement (16% and 36% higher than average- or low-dexterity organizations, respectively).

The combination of collaborative learning norms and an entrepreneurial, engaged workforce is crucial for developing digital dexterity. Collaborative learning can support all workers in building skills, competence, and the perspective to guide entrepreneurial effort. Organizational leaders can help by setting clear goals, encouraging boundary-spanning collaboration, providing liberal access to relevant information, and then trusting their workers to bring the best expertise to bear for each challenge.

4. Data and Tools

Unsurprisingly, the fourth support for digital dexterity comprises assets such as digital tools and data. When skills, competence and engagement are established, the easy availability of data and communication tools complement performance-related outcomes.

In our dataset, organizations with high levels of digital dexterity stood out from those with average or low levels of digital dexterity on measures of data availability (16% higher than average; 33% higher than lowest dexterity organizations) and collaborative tools (20% higher than average; 51% higher than lowest dexterity organizations).

Access to quality data (i.e. timely, accurate, and complete data) is central to digital transformation. Accurate and timely data aids workers in improving internal business operations and responding effectively to customer demands. As workers realize the benefits of data-driven outcomes, they use data-driven approaches more consistently, creating a virtuous cycle.

Access to effective communication, collaboration, and coordination tools are also crucial for facilitating the key practices of collaborative learning and decision-making, and supporting the social connections that build engagement.

Digital Dexterity: The Leader’s Role

Astute digital leaders try to embed these elements in their organizations, to support and optimize their digital investments. However, leaders cannot mandate the development of values and norms such as collaboration, self-organization, and entrepreneurial engagement. Instead, leaders must cultivate the conditions that encourage new mindsets and practices:

  • Foster a digital mindset through leading by example.
  • Build consensus about responsibilities without regard to traditional boundaries and roles.
  • Model and encourage collaborative interaction and continuous learning.
  • Visibly practice and require data-driven decision-making.
  • Provide access to key digital resources and publicly acknowledge their effective use.

In sum, strong top-down leadership is important but should be exercised with a subtle hand.

 

Related Reading:

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The Content Liberation Movement Comes to BookExpo America 2018 http://www.copyright.com/blog/the-content-liberation-movement-comes-to-bookexpo-america-2018/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/the-content-liberation-movement-comes-to-bookexpo-america-2018/#respond Fri, 25 May 2018 19:47:28 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16628 A core theme of this year’s BookExpo is increasingly dynamic content consumption, and the new models and tools needed to keep pace – a common challenge among publishers, and one to which Renee Swank of Ixxus is no stranger.

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Copyright Clearance Center and Ixxus are excited to participate in the 2018 “edition” of BookExpo America, taking place May 30 – June 1, 2018 in New York City at the Javits Center. More than just a tradeshow, BookExpo is where all those who play a key part in the publishing industry – authors, booksellers, distributors, librarians, technology partners, publishers and more – unite to share insight, learn about tools needed to grow business, and get the pulse of what’s trending in today’s shifting marketplace.

The Drawbacks of Traditional Publishing Workflows

A core theme of this year’s meeting is increasingly dynamic content consumption, and the new models and tools needed to keep pace – a common challenge among publishers, and one to which Renee Swank of Ixxus is no stranger. With 25+ years’ experience in content publishing and knowledge management, Renee has an extensive track record helping organizations drive business transformation to support content enrichment processes, as well as new ways to discover, search, and analyze content. “Even in an increasingly digital age, in many cases publishers are still relying on a workflow that confines their business by revolving around a specific format – the print book,” says Renee. “It becomes very difficult, if not impossible, to deliver content in innovative, high value ways – especially on mobile devices.”

Content Liberation – A Movement for Profitability and Sustainability

So, what’s the trick to breaking down the barriers, liberating your content, and securing the flexibility required to stay competitive? Renee and her colleagues at Ixxus know it all starts with a format-agnostic workflow: “Whether you’re mixing and matching pieces of existing content in new ways to drive revenue from new markets, or increasing efficiencies by pushing content to different platforms or formats all in one go, digital-first processes, and the associated mentality, have a direct, measurable impact on business performance.”

Learn More at the Can’t-Miss Panel

Learn more about digital transformation accelerators that can help editors and executives manage more effectively the full lifecycle of book and related content from editorial through publication, and beyond during The Content Liberation Movement panel on Thursday, March 31, 2018, 11:00 AM – 11:50 AM, Location 1E16, where Renee joins fellow panelists Max Riggsbee, Co-founder of Gadget Software, and Ankur Laroia, Leader of Solutions Strategy at Alfresco.

Additional Must-Attend Sessions

Covering Books from Cover to Cover
Friday, June 1st, 2018
11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Location 1E16

CCC’s Chris Kenneally hosts a panel of influential journalists and analysts who cover national and international book markets. From the challenges of online commerce to bestseller lists dominated by authors with internationally-recognized brands, book markets in the United States, United Kingdom, and across Europe have much in common. Of course, national differences remain in spite of globalization. Apart from cultural preferences and languages, price discounting, which is a feature of US and UK markets that’s taken for granted, is forbidden by law in France, Germany and elsewhere. Panelists will discuss where they see room for more common ground.

State of the Industry: Publishing and Copyright Policy
Thursday, May 31st, 2018
10:15 AM – 11:00 AM
Location 1E12/1E13/1E14

Some of the most influential voices in copyright policy – Maria A. Pallante, President and CEO of the Association of American Publishers; Mary Rasenberger, Executive Director of the Authors Guild; and Keith Kupferschmid, CEO of the Copyright Alliance – explore the equities of copyright law as they relate to authors, publishers, and other aspects of the public interest, from the promise of global digital commerce to the evolving legal landscape in the courts and on Capitol Hill.

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