Digital Transformation – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com Rights Licensing Expert Fri, 20 Apr 2018 20:37:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.copyright.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/cropped-ccc-favicon-32x32.png Digital Transformation – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com 32 32 Join Us at the 2018 London Book Fair http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-us-at-the-2018-london-book-fair/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-us-at-the-2018-london-book-fair/#respond Thu, 29 Mar 2018 15:22:03 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16070 From 10-12 April 2018, CCC and Ixxus will be premium partners, exhibitors and panel participants at the 2018 London Book Fair.

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From 10-12 April 2018, CCC and Ixxus will be premium partners, exhibitors and panel participants at the 2018 London Book Fair at the Olympia Conference Center in London. Any attendees can visit us at Stand #7C16, or follow the action on Twitter with #LBF18. On Monday, 9 April, CCC and Ixxus will host an invitation-only lunch with BookMachine and an evening networking reception with Byte the Book. Ixxus will also be debuting its new workflow tool, Content Kanban. Learn more about CCC’s presence at the 2018 London Book Fair here, and browse our panel summaries below.

Collaboration & Community: The Transition to Open Access
Tuesday 10 April 2018, 11:30 – 12:30
The Faculty (Stand 7A11), Hall 7, National Hall
“The UK is well above global averages of open access publishing, and is at the forefront of a significant global movement which is fundamentally changing the way that research is conceived, conducted, disseminated and rewarded,” noted a December 2017 report for the Universities UK Open Access Coordination Group. Responsibility for driving remarkable change across the scholarly publishing landscape is widely shared, yet the evolving relationship of publishers and institutional libraries is perhaps the most critical. The panel will assess the state of OA today and lay out a vision for a sustainable and integrated publishing workflow solution that minimizes costs, promotes transparency and supports a range of business models.

  • Sven Fund, Managing Director, Knowledge Unlatched
  • Chris Leonard, Head of Product, Emerald Group Publishing
  • Matthew Day, Head of Open and Data Publishing, Cambridge University Press
  • Dr. Danny Kingsley, Deputy Director, Scholarly Communication and Research Services, Cambridge University Library

Use your Data to Drive Revenue
Tuesday, 10 Apr 2018, 13:00 – 14:00

The Faculty
“Data is the new oil” hit the headlines last year. So, what about monetising the data you already hold? Publishers hold a vast array of information about customers, authors, and content, but how do you really generate publishing revenue from this untapped resource. This session will give practical advice from expert speakers across several types of publishing data.
How to utilise the information you hold about customers. Where to start, from organising customer data in different systems, to analysing your interactions with institutions. How you can prospect against organisation profiles, author affiliations, and other data elements.
How to use taxonomies help improve search and discovery. Much has been said about taxonomies, ontologies, authority files, and other controls. But how do they actually work to improve search discovery? How are they implemented, where, and why?
How to evaluate technologies that will help organisations make the most of their content through effective storage and semantic exploitation. Addressing the hyper-personalisation of content and how less is often more in effective delivery of the content users want.

  • Laura Cox, Ringgold, Inc.
  • Dr Ian Synge, Ixxus
  • Margie Hlava, artist

Global Copyright Legislation: What you need to know
Wednesday 11 April 2018, 11:30 – 12:00
The Faculty
Hosted by ALPSP, panelists will provide a roundup of recent and proposed amendments to copyright legislation in the US, Europe and Australia.

  • Sarah Faulder, PLS
  • Roy Kaufman, Copyright Clearance Center
  • Ruth Tellis, RightsZone & Rights2

Small Steps, Giant Leaps: The Digital Transformation Experience
Wednesday 11 April 2018, 13:00 – 14:00
The Faculty (Stand 7A11), Hall 7, National Hall
Content management and digital transformation depend on technology, clearly. Yet a successful digital transformation project will rely as much on redefining and reimagining the experiences of customers, employees, and other stakeholders as it does on the underlying solution. Meanwhile, content management plays an increasingly critical role as part of a wider set of smart information management strategies guide decision-making process and direct technology investments. The panel will share stories of innovation in publishing marked by changes in workflow and production as well as in markets and customer habits.

  • John Newton, Co-founder, Alfresco
  • Kiren Shoman, Executive Director, Book Editorial, SAGE Publications
  • Jonathan Brett-Harris, Managing Director, Ixxus
  • Junaid Mubeen, Director of Education, Whizz Education
  • Kathryn Earle, Managing Director, Digital Resources Division, Bloomsbury Publishing Plc

A Copyright Conversation on the Evolving Role of Rights and Licensing in Publishing
Wednesday 11 April 2018, 11:30 – 12:00
Research & Scholarly Publishing Forum
A conversation between two leading figures from the world of copyright on the issues and challenges arising as publishers evolve into technology companies and, likewise, tech companies begin to emerge as publishers.

  • Tracey Armstrong, President and CEO, Copyright Clearance Center
  • Caroline Boyd, COO, The Copyright Hub UK

Aspirations and Anxieties: How Authors See Copyright Today
Thursday 12 April 2018, 13:00 – 14:00
The Faculty (Stand 7A11), Hall 7, National Hall
One of the more complex — and possibly, least understood — areas of publishing is copyright. In 2018, copyright laws and general respect for intellectual property face tremendous public and policy pressures in the UK, across the EU and around the world. How do authors consider the threats to their livelihoods — and how are the managing the opportunities? What, in other words, do the actual copyright-holders think about copyright? Join author Daniel Hahn and lawyer Nicola Solomon, chief executive of the UK Society of Authors, as they discuss the authors’ perspective, in conversation with the Copyright Clearance Center’s Christopher Kenneally.

  • Daniel Hahn, Prize-winning Translator
  • Nicola Solomon, Chief Executive, Society of Authors

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YouTube Embraces Unique Identifiers with ISNI http://www.copyright.com/blog/youtube-embraces-unique-identifiers-isni/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/youtube-embraces-unique-identifiers-isni/#respond Thu, 22 Mar 2018 17:07:24 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16029 YouTube has announced its adoption of unique serial numbers for each creator through the ISO-regulated ISNI standard.

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Unique identifiers are a useful tool in many consumer experiences. They can assist purchasing decisions (e.g., the paperback ISBN of To Kill a Mockingbird is 9780060935467, versus 9780062420701 for hardcover). They can indicate adherence to quality requirements set by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). They can aid in customer service complaints. Now, unique IDs are coming to YouTube.

I was part of the ISO working group that created the International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) and have represented the International Federation of Reproduction Rights Organizations (IFRRO) as Chairman of the ISNI board for the past two years. It has been fascinating in that time to see the range of communities applying or showing interest in the standard – record labels, collective management organizations, movie studios, libraries, and many more. The ISNI community has also become global with members and registration agencies in Asia, Europe, and North America.

It was announced in January 2018 that YouTube has decided to adopt ISNI and will assign unique ISNIs to the creators whose work appears on the platform for the purposes of accurate attribution and data reconciliation. The adoption of any standard numbering scheme by a company as large and influential as YouTube is a big deal in the world of metadata, and the move has been widely acclaimed. Others are sure to follow. Long used by national and other libraries, YouTube’s move propels ISNI into the music space and the commercial world in a big way.

Learn more: Executive Director of the ISNI International Agency Tim Devenport speaks to Beyond the Book

YouTube Knows Who You Are - Tim Devenport

If you’re not familiar with ISNI, it’s an international standard (ISO 27729). It’s a unique, sixteen-digit number assigned to each “public identity” of a creator such as an artist, musician, writer, or illustrator and is intended to help fix the problem of name ambiguity in applications such as search and discovery, attribution, and payment. Approximately 9 million individuals and 700,000 organizations currently have ISNIs assigned to them. ISNI is gradually becoming a critical component in Linked Data and Semantic Web applications and is already used extensively by libraries and archives to share catalog information.

The assignment of unique numbers to identities, whether they are individual (e.g. John Lennon), collective (The Beatles), organizational (CNN) or fictional (Spiderman) can be a great boon, for example, when it comes to making accurate royalty payments. Librarians have understood for years the value of assigning unique numbers to identities in library catalogs and bibliographies, to help eliminate, or at least minimize, the confusion caused by common names or variant spellings of names. Is it Mao Tse Tung or Mao Zedong, Dostoevsky or Dostoevskii? I wonder if Michael Jackson, the American jazz guitarist, ever gets sent in error the royalties owed to The King of Pop? If so, does he ever send them back? These are the kinds of real-world problems that unique numbering of individuals is designed to solve.

In the late 1960s a cult TV show in the UK called The Prisoner baffled and entertained audiences. Its hero, known only as Number 6, proclaimed at the beginning of every episode, “I am not a number. I am a free man.” The numbering of individuals has dystopian overtones, but it’s hard to deny its value in some contexts. Standard numbers have been a feature of the media industries for decades and have played a key part in building efficient, global supply chains. Books, journals, and recordings have had unique numbers for years, and now digital creators are following that trend.

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Global Publishing Trends in 2018 http://www.copyright.com/blog/global-publishing-trends-2018/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/global-publishing-trends-2018/#respond Thu, 15 Mar 2018 17:45:00 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=15984 The three driving forces behind digital disruption in global publishing are economic shifts, market fragmentation and consumer power.

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How big is global book publishing? And why should you care? Because within the business data lie critical clues for digital transformation.

Rüdiger Wischenbart , co-founder of BookMap, a non-profit initiative on international publishing statistics, believes an understanding of world book markets can drive decisions that will position your content to best advantage everywhere.

Global Publishing Trends in 2018

Author of the highly-regarded Global eBook Report, Wischenbart shared his latest data on the world’s biggest publishing markets during a recent Copyright Clearance Center webinar. As lines blur among books and other media, publishers must manage content assets and rights with the confidence that comes with quality data.

“When we speak here about digital, I’m not only talking about e-books. I’m talking about a digital transformation. I mean that a publishing company suddenly is driven and organized in a digitally organized value chain and work processes,” Wischenbart explains.

“Three major forces that really make the change. Number one, we have arrived – it’s not the future, it’s the present. We have arrived in a network economy for the book industry as well, and that means we have winner-take-all markets, where a few major and bigger and better-financed players are in a so much stronger position than all the little guys.

Learn More: Explore CCC’s Copyright Certificate Courses

“This is reinforced by market fragmentation,” he continues. “When I have a big organization, I can play around here and experiment there and acquire a little start-up or a little imprint from somewhere else. I can really play across all those different niches and fields. I even can fix a mistake that I may have made when – just recently in the US, Michael Wolff’s Fire and Fury [has been] so much more successful than the publisher had expected. I have the tools to do this, and that is making the competition so much stronger against all the small and middle-sized publishing companies.

“Finally, a third factor [is] that is publishing traditionally thought that the publishers, the authors, and their offer are defining the market. But in a networked economy, in a corporate economy, in all these digital pipes and channels and platforms, it’s the consumers, it’s the customers who define it.”

View the transcript here.

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Join CCC and Ixxus at Tempo di Libri, Livre Paris and FILBo http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-ixxus-tempo-di-libri-livre-paris-filbo/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-ixxus-tempo-di-libri-livre-paris-filbo/#respond Mon, 05 Mar 2018 08:00:15 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=15859 Catch The Digital Transformation of Publishing: Challenges and Keys to Success in Italian at Tempo di Libri, French at Livre Paris and Spanish at FILBo.

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During March and April, professionals in Italy, France and Colombia will have the opportunity to attend the presentation The Digital Transformation of Publishing: Challenges and Keys to Success.

Where is the publishing industry in its path of digital transformation? What are the obstacles? How can data move more efficiently? Discover the answers through a survey of large international publishing houses and the innovative strategies and solutions proposed by Ixxus, a subsidiary of Copyright Clearance Center (CCC).

Join CCC and Ixxus at Tempo di Libri, Livre Paris and FILBo

8 March 2018, 16:30-17:15

Tempo di Libri (Italian-language conference)

Milan, Italy

Spazio AIE

La trasformazione digitale dell’editoria: sfide e chiavi del successo: Dove si trova l’editoria nel suo percorso di trasformazione digitale? Quali sono gli ostacoli? Come avanzare in modo più efficiente? Victoriano Colodrón presenterà un’indagine condotta tra grandi case editrici internazionali e le strategie e le soluzioni innovative proposte da Ixxus, società sussidiaria di Copyright Clearance Center. #mondodigitale

Join CCC and Ixxus at Tempo di Libri, Livre Paris and FILBo

19 March 2018, 12:00 – 12:30

Livre Paris (French-language conference)

Paris, France

Stand Allemagne, 1-P67

Où en est la transformation numérique de l’édition? Quels sont les obstacles? Comment avancer plus rapidement? Victoriano Colodrón (Copyright Clearance Center) présentera les résultats d’une enquête menée auprès de maisons d’édition internationales, la stratégie développée par Ixxus et des solutions novatrices en matière de “discoverability”, d’agilité des contenus, de métadonnées.

Join CCC and Ixxus at Tempo di Libri, Livre Paris and FILBo

19 April 2018, 12:00-12:30

Feria Internacional del Libro de Bogotá [FILBo] (Spanish-language conference)

Bogotá, Colombia

Stand Frankfurter Buchmesse, 1702A

¿En qué punto se encuentra la industria editorial en su trayecto de transformación digital? ¿Cuáles son los obstáculos que encuentran las editoriales? ¿Y cómo avanzar de una manera más rápida y eficaz? Victoriano Colodrón, de Copyright Clearance Center (CCC), presentará los resultados de una encuesta realizada entre responsables de grandes editoriales internacionales. Asimismo, hablará del enfoque estratégico en torno a la transformación digital que propone la empresa filial de CCC, Ixxus, y de sus soluciones innovadoras en materia de almacenamiento y ‘agilidad’ de los contenidos, metadatos, discoverability y colaboración.

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With Flexibility, Publishers Can Turn the OER Boom To Their Advantage – Here’s How http://www.copyright.com/blog/oer-open-educational-resources-publishers-advantage/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/oer-open-educational-resources-publishers-advantage/#respond Tue, 06 Feb 2018 08:02:55 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=15376 Can OER (Open Educational Resources) provide a push for publishers to broaden their offerings, adapt their business models and reap new revenue streams?

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*Note: This piece was originally published in DeltaThink’s December 2017 newsletter.

The newest twist in educational publishing—Open Educational Resources or OER—is dramatically disrupting textbook publishing, and conventional wisdom holds that these resources may even replace traditional textbooks all together. Case in point: in just four years, Eureka Math, an OER K-12 curriculum developed by the nonprofit GreatMinds.org, and funded by a federal grant to the New York State Education Department, has become the most widely used math curriculum in the United States according to a 2016 report by the Rand Corporation. Out of the 1168 elementary school teachers Rand surveyed, 52% said they used Eureka. In comparison, the most popular math textbook was used by only 32% of teachers.

While moving slower than math, OER is becoming a presence in English Language Arts, particularly given recent developments in states like Louisiana. More than 80 percent of school districts in that state have adopted– in whole or in part– a teacher -developed OER English Language Arts curriculum known as “guidebooks,” primarily in response to Common Core requirements. “There wasn’t anything on the market good enough for our teachers,” the assistant superintendent of academic content at Louisiana’s education department told Education Week in an article last spring. This curriculum is spreading beyond Louisiana. On November 2, Open-Up Resources, a startup that originated as a multi-state collaborative (and led by a former Pearson executive), announced its adoption and offering of a curriculum based on the Louisiana OER.

Yet despite these events, conventional wisdom about the death of textbook publishing just might be wrong. The need for scope and sequence of materials have seen OER developers like Great Minds and Open-Up Resources adopt models that, while OER based, have attributes suspiciously similar to traditional publishing. And in higher education, Cengage may be seen as disrupting itself by launching a fully CC-BY OER platform called “OpenNow.” Accordingly, OER can provide a push for publishers to broaden their offerings, adapt their business models and reap new revenue streams, even as the publishing landscape continues to morph and make room for the new breed of OER publishers. There is an obvious parallel to Open Access publishing.

What OER offers that traditional publishers don’t

The startling OER adoption statistics in K-12 were driven, in part, by the need for school districts to quickly find teaching materials that aligned to the Common Core standards. The Eureka Math curriculum was created to fill this need, and as an OER, it can also be updated, customized and revised for errors or updated pedagogy more quickly than is possible with the revision cycles of old-school textbooks. Not to mention that OER are “free” to use (more about those quote marks later), reducing the risk of adopting the yet-untested curriculum. Similarly, a district may view the cost of moving away from an OER curriculum as smaller than with a traditional textbook that involves a substantial investment in books (although with OER training and implementation costs remain substantial, perhaps even higher). OERs also offer school districts a seeming ability to update and adapt the curriculum themselves, and to do so without threat of infringement on a publisher’s copyright. However, while appealing, such control can be difficult to implement.

OER obstacles

Of course, there are challenges with OER, too. For one thing, in its original form much of OER was served up online in a smorgasbord of random lesson plans of varying quality, unsystematically connected to the Common Core State Standards, and to some degree it remains like this today. Teachers needed to select quality materials and align them in scope and sequence to ensure that the student received adequate instruction on all the relevant skills in proper sequence (e.g. you cannot teach multiplication before learning addition).

The new breed of OER publishers need a sustainable business model to pay for quality content and must move away from free floating lessons and ensure full scope and sequence. As Kate Gerson, formerly of the New York State Regents Research Fund, told Education Week, “You have to solve the who-pays-for-it question if you’re going to develop good material.” And even more so when it will require comprehensive alignment to standards.

Which brings me to the big question with OER: Does it actually have a sustainable business model?

First, as with most complex economic systems, there are many paths to both sustainability and failure. To state the obvious, without models to underwrite funding for OER, its producers will run into trouble. High quality content is never truly free; it needs some kind of funding to be created, supported and updated. Initially, governmental agencies and private foundations in the United States provided funding for the creation of OER materials, but the struggle to identify sustainable models to eliminate dependence on these sources of funding has reduced interest among some foundations.

The future of OER will be developed by the professionals, such as Cengage, GreatMinds, Open-Up Resources and the State of Louisiana. Financial models will involve print on demand, sale of canonical works to accompany OER curricula, teacher training, assessment, and a host of related services. Publishers who wish to benefit from these new developments must be as nimble as their new OER publishing competitors. They must also focus on what OER does not give away for free, and jump in to fill the gaps.

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Opportunities to Digitally Transform Publishing http://www.copyright.com/blog/opportunities-to-digitally-transform-publishing-orchestrating-business-process-content-and-data-for-future-value/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/opportunities-to-digitally-transform-publishing-orchestrating-business-process-content-and-data-for-future-value/#respond Thu, 09 Nov 2017 08:00:29 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14707 Orchestrating business process, content, and data for future value: Publishers should embrace data-driven decision-making through digital transformation.

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Orchestrating business process, content, and data for future value

The US television network NBC stumbled in their digital transformation journey when, in September 2007, they pulled out of a partnership with Apple to stream their content on iTunes. Over the next couple of months, piracy of NBC content compared to its contemporaries grew more than 11 percent while piracy of NBC content from a unit perspective more than doubled. The losses were so impactful that in less than a year, NBC did a complete reversal and accepted Apple’s terms.

The failure of NBC wasn’t a technical problem—it was a business problem. They were so focused on protecting an old business model that they failed to plan for the future.

“We need to speed up science. One thing that slows us down today is that it can take a year or longer to publish research in a scientific journal.”

When the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative launched in April of this year, president Cori Bergmann said, “We need to speed up science. One thing that slows us down today is that it can take a year or longer to publish research in a scientific journal.”

Scientific publishing provides a microcosm of the challenges that all publishers face. Primary among those are user expectations of speed, seamless workflow, and strong collaboration. Data can be processed at unprecedented volume and rates to gain new scientific insights. Technological advances in processing data result in the demand for more data. Researchers expect to easily access this data instantly.

Digital efforts—like the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, which is funding an effort to allow researchers to share drafts of papers before the papers are published— begin to address researcher expectations.

The goal is to allow scientists and researchers to share drafts of their papers and results of their research, including negative results, before the peer review process to drive greater collaboration and speed discovery.

In a 2017 survey conducted of 25 leading STM and trade publishers in the UK and US, digital transformation was seen as “critical to business growth” while being frustratingly complex. The frustration comes from clinging to old business models and thinking that parts of the system can be saved by implementing new technologies. This was NBC’s mistake in 2007.

While changing researcher expectations is critical, emerging changes to research incentives will create more dramatic demands on publishing—for more agility, services, and innovation. Publishers, therefore, need to think bigger and move quickly.

Digital transformation is about changing business processes and systems to enable companies to bring value to market more quickly.

Related Reading: The Definitive Guide to Digital Transformation

In scientific publishing, that value is being defined by the market today as more published research results, seamless access to content, and massive data sets in addition to journal articles to feed data processing.

Publishers can gain a better understanding of their customers and embrace data-driven decision-making through digital transformation. They can establish new processes that leverage the value of existing data while capturing new data.

This requires the ability to create new workflows and manage old ones, in a way that doesn’t disrupt current business while accommodating new opportunities.

In a move seen as crazy by industry insiders, in 2011, Netflix committed $100 million to produce two full seasons of a TV series. Their data crunchers had analyzed viewing patterns of 33 million subscribers and were confident the show would be a hit. While major networks waited for Netflix to fail, House of Cards went on to become a huge success, winning Emmy and Golden Globe awards.

NBC didn’t understand the shift in user expectations in 2007. Netflix used data to defy accepted norms, investing in two seasons of shows and producing a massive success.

Publishers would be wise to learn from other content industries, recognize the power of shifting user expectations, and harness the power of data through digital transformation to create future value.

This post originally appeared in the October 11, 2017 Publishing Perspectives Show Daily Magazine (p. 21).

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Knowledge Engineering: The New Business-Value Accelerator in the Digital Transformation Journey http://www.copyright.com/blog/knowledge-engineering-new-business-value-accelerator-digital-transformation-journey/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/knowledge-engineering-new-business-value-accelerator-digital-transformation-journey/#respond Thu, 02 Nov 2017 20:00:57 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14738 A panel of experts discusses how knowledge engineering accelerates this digital transformation in three critical ways.

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Knowledge Engineering is the Next Leg of the Digital Transformation Journey. Scholarly publishers are on a technology journey to extend their content’s value and bring customers workflows that facilitate collaboration and deliver analytic insights. Industry experts Carl Robinson, Principal Consultant, Ixxus; and Babis Marmanis, VP and CTO, Copyright Clearance Center discuss how knowledge engineering accelerates this digital transformation in three critical ways — through comprehensive data analysis that provides insights to drive discovery; through management for authors and partners based on the analysis of their relationships; and through automated granular asset identification.

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Content Storage in Focus http://www.copyright.com/blog/content-storage-focus/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/content-storage-focus/#respond Thu, 24 Aug 2017 08:00:12 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14035 Healthy content storage is the foundation of digital transformation.

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This is the second in an occasional series of posts designed to expand more fully on interviews with publishing industry leaders for a recent research report, “Industry Leaders’ Perspectives on the Digital Transformation Journey in Publishing.”

In a nutshell, “content storage” refers to the place where your files live. In any given office, this might include some combination of desktop folders, network drives, an intranet, a wiki, a CRM with file libraries, and, perhaps, a cloud system like Google Drive or Outlook 365.

The attitude is that content storage is old news – implementation of an enterprise-wide content storage solution required large sums of resources, and it didn’t even solve all the problems that it was supposed to.

The ideal content storage example would be a single, global, centralized file repository in the cloud, instead of patched together siloes and systems. This content storage location would hold content in all formats, from audio clips to XHTML files and everything in between. A cascading folder hierarchy would be consistent across the whole system. File names would follow strict conventions. Employees would share files in the cloud, and use live editing and versioning of each document, rather than cluttering the platform with duplicate copies.

Challenges

Creating and maintaining a content storage solution is demanding. Not only does a digital architecture need to be installed, but every member of the organization must buy in to the project. Everyone must comply with new rules about naming conventions, folder hierarchy, and file versioning.

Existing content storage solutions, which could involve thousands of files saved across countless devices, cloud systems, and even filing cabinets, must be retrofitted to plug into the new plan. It takes time, money, and lots of effort.

Benefits

But the benefits of content storage are legion. Healthy content storage is the foundation for digital transformation. Logical folder groups, consistent naming conventions and ‘one source of truth’ file versioning sets the stage for digital transformation to take full effect. In other words, the sleekest search tools in the world are worthless without good raw data to search.

Role in Digital Transformation Overall

Despite its vital importance, content storage was scored second-to-last by publishing executives in terms of importance to the future of their business, according to interviews conducted by Imbue Partners on behalf of CCC and Ixxus.

Conversations with and data from publishing industry leaders, as reported in “Industry Leaders’ Perspectives on the Digital Transformation Journey in Publishing,” imply that content storage has had its moment in the spotlight. Many publishers have already considered it, and come to varied conclusions. Some, for example, underestimated the complexity of content storage and embarked on a plan that turned out to be untenable. Others overestimated the challenges and concluded that efficient content storage just wasn’t worth the effort. Still others have already adopted some sort of storage solution, or they’ve assigned a committee to create a strategy to do so.

The attitude is that content storage is old news – implementation of an enterprise-wide content storage solution requires vast resources, and it might not even solve all the problems that it’s supposed to.

One interviewee told the Imbue researchers, “…where you store your content is not as important as your ability to access that information.”

The trouble is, the concepts of content storage and content accessibility are interdependent. It would be a shame to have a robust content storage platform with limited search capabilities; likewise, a sophisticated search won’t be of much use if the system’s data is a mess. No matter what, skipping the content storage phase will render the other phases of digital transformation useless. Metadata, discoverability, content agility and automated collaboration simply will not function without a solid content storage foundation in place.

For more on digital transformation, check out the first post in this series: The Definitive Guide to Digital Transformation, download the white paper “Industry Leaders’ Perspectives on the Digital Transformation Journey in Publishing,” or read up on best practices from Ixxus.

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The Definitive Guide to Digital Transformation http://www.copyright.com/blog/definitive-guide-digital-transformation/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/definitive-guide-digital-transformation/#respond Thu, 11 May 2017 18:58:21 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=12937 Digital transformation, defined: content storage, metadata, discoverability, content agility, and automated collaboration.

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Digital transformation is a controversial subject, despite the many benefits it conveys for publishers and their customers. When it comes to making systemic changes across their organization, publishers anticipate frustration, expense, and hugely complicated, multi-year implementation plans. Even agreeing on common definitions for the basic steps toward digital transformation can be convoluted, as evidenced by the recent study commissioned by CCC and Ixxus, Industry Leaders’ Perspectives on Digital Transformation.

Even agreeing on common definitions for the basic steps toward digital transformation can be convoluted, as evidenced by the recent study commissioned by CCC and Ixxus, Industry Leaders’ Perspectives on Digital Transformation.

Why Pursue Digital Transformation?

Based on interviews with 25 senior leaders of publishing organizations in the STM, Education, and Trade sectors, publishers today have three common goals which spur the industry toward the modern, large-scale technology adaptations known as digital transformation.

  1. Respond to consumer demand: Customers now expect easy, immediate, inexpensive access to content in many formats and across many channels.
  2. Create new revenue streams: MOOCs, self-publishing, new distribution channels, and digital competitors have significantly eroded book and journal revenue.
  3. Develop new product opportunities: Digitizing the back catalogue makes it easy to export existing content to new formats and markets, and in turn, to generate new revenue.

Digital Transformation, Defined

At CCC and Ixxus, we have identified the five essential steps in the digital transformation sequence: content storage, metadata, discoverability, content agility, and automated collaboration.

Content Storage

Essentially, content storage is the place where your content lives. Although the ideal example would be a single, global, centralized file repository in the cloud, most organizations currently rely on patched together siloes and systems. In any given office, this might include some combination of desktop folders, network drives, an intranet, a wiki, and, perhaps, a cloud system like Google Drive or Outlook 365.

Metadata

Metadata is short-hand for the use of software to apply labels or tags to files in an automated, systematic way. The tags enable quick browsing, making it possible to pull relevant files on demand. The largest barrier in this process is tackling publishers’ massive back catalogues.

Discoverability

There are two sides to discoverability: internal, as in the organization’s ability to locate content for production; and external, as in the end-user’s ability to find content. Machine-powered smart search can pull the materials you want, plus related materials that you didn’t even know were there. Another way to think of discoverability is like a roadmap that provides the most direct route to the content you need – avoiding too many sub-menus and extra clicks along the way.

Content Agility

Content agility results from the successful implementation of content storage, metadata, and discoverability practices. When those factors are in place, publishers can easily respond to external demands by identifying opportunities to reuse and repurpose content. This optimization can offer significant advantages to organizational information and assets, breathing new life into existing content.

Automated Collaboration

Automated collaboration overarches the other four elements of digital transformation. Internally, this can mean live-editing documents, e.g., enabling multiple staff members to work together on a shared spreadsheet. On a larger scale, think of linking content, e.g., changing a master file and prompting the same change to be made on every item derived from that file.

The Future is Now

Tech-savvy consumers are ready for digital transformation. They expect sophisticated searching abilities at their fingertips. They’re hungry for insightful content, regardless of publication date, delivered instantly in PDF, HTML, XML, or whichever file format comes next. They want access to automated collaboration tools for easy manipulation of content. Digital transformation is the means to those ends. It’s more than a trend – it’s a systemic shift in the content industry, and it’s here to stay.

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The Data Dilemma http://www.copyright.com/blog/the-data-dilemma/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/the-data-dilemma/#respond Thu, 04 May 2017 08:00:39 +0000 http://www.dev1.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=10859 Industry leaders say, ‘Data is the new oil’ and ‘Information is the new petroleum.’ Yet, data by itself has little meaning.

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Let’s start with the obvious question: what is data? From a publisher’s perspective, data is content within journals, books, articles, websites, and blog posts. Industry leaders tell us, ‘Data is the new oil’ and ‘Information is the new petroleum.’ Yet, data by itself has little meaning.

But that’s not the dilemma. Instead, it’s what to do with all that data. How can we use data to its full potential, deriving meaning and value from it?

How can we use data to its full potential, deriving meaning and value from it?

If we think of data less as the new oil and more as the land that contains the oil, the comparison becomes sharper. You suspect that an area of land holds something of value beneath the surface, be it oil, gas or a precious metal; your job is to get to it and capitalize on its value. In much the same way, publishers need to access and process data to reveal actionable insights and gain value.

Fortunately, businesses can now collect and analyze data with greater speed and in larger quantities than ever before. We have moved away from the limitations of structured data and toward the more open realms of sophisticated algorithms and the cloud. Such advances in technology have empowered us to extract real value from data, and the results have never been more in demand.

What’s standing in the way of understanding data? Our imaginations and our ability to innovate. We must transform these resources into real business value and give customers the information they need in ways that serve them best. Some publishers are doing this already, but most need to play catch-up.

Machines are great at processing data at lightning speed, but as yet no computer has formulated an original idea. For that, you need a uniquely human ingredient, gut instinct. Fortunately, intuition still has a place in the world of publishing. Machines are here not to replace us, but to help us and, in doing so, to make us more powerful.

According to World Economic Forum Executive Chairman Klaus Schwab, we are entering the Fourth Industrial Revolution. He states: “We stand on the brink of a technological revolution that will fundamentally alter the way we live, work, and relate to one another. In its scale, scope, and complexity, the transformation will be unlike anything humankind has experienced before.”

It’s no longer simply business as usual; it’s time to adapt and embrace the new. We face a dilemma: shall we watch from the sidelines or shall we start digging to unearth those resources, discover their value, and benefit from the possibilities?

Our world is changing, and we must change with it. Our willingness to tap into the value within our data will differentiate the pioneers from the laggards, the winners from the losers.

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