Digital Transformation – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com Rights Licensing Expert Fri, 17 Nov 2017 17:09:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.copyright.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/cropped-ccc-favicon-32x32.png Digital Transformation – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com 32 32 Opportunities to Digitally Transform Publishing http://www.copyright.com/blog/opportunities-to-digitally-transform-publishing-orchestrating-business-process-content-and-data-for-future-value/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/opportunities-to-digitally-transform-publishing-orchestrating-business-process-content-and-data-for-future-value/#respond Thu, 09 Nov 2017 08:00:29 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14707 Orchestrating business process, content, and data for future value: Publishers should embrace data-driven decision-making through digital transformation.

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Orchestrating business process, content, and data for future value

The US television network NBC stumbled in their digital transformation journey when, in September 2007, they pulled out of a partnership with Apple to stream their content on iTunes. Over the next couple of months, piracy of NBC content compared to its contemporaries grew more than 11 percent while piracy of NBC content from a unit perspective more than doubled. The losses were so impactful that in less than a year, NBC did a complete reversal and accepted Apple’s terms.

The failure of NBC wasn’t a technical problem—it was a business problem. They were so focused on protecting an old business model that they failed to plan for the future.

“We need to speed up science. One thing that slows us down today is that it can take a year or longer to publish research in a scientific journal.”

When the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative launched in April of this year, president Cori Bergmann said, “We need to speed up science. One thing that slows us down today is that it can take a year or longer to publish research in a scientific journal.”

Scientific publishing provides a microcosm of the challenges that all publishers face. Primary among those are user expectations of speed, seamless workflow, and strong collaboration. Data can be processed at unprecedented volume and rates to gain new scientific insights. Technological advances in processing data result in the demand for more data. Researchers expect to easily access this data instantly.

Digital efforts—like the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, which is funding an effort to allow researchers to share drafts of papers before the papers are published— begin to address researcher expectations.

The goal is to allow scientists and researchers to share drafts of their papers and results of their research, including negative results, before the peer review process to drive greater collaboration and speed discovery.

In a 2017 survey conducted of 25 leading STM and trade publishers in the UK and US, digital transformation was seen as “critical to business growth” while being frustratingly complex. The frustration comes from clinging to old business models and thinking that parts of the system can be saved by implementing new technologies. This was NBC’s mistake in 2007.

While changing researcher expectations is critical, emerging changes to research incentives will create more dramatic demands on publishing—for more agility, services, and innovation. Publishers, therefore, need to think bigger and move quickly.

Digital transformation is about changing business processes and systems to enable companies to bring value to market more quickly.

Related Reading: The Definitive Guide to Digital Transformation

In scientific publishing, that value is being defined by the market today as more published research results, seamless access to content, and massive data sets in addition to journal articles to feed data processing.

Publishers can gain a better understanding of their customers and embrace data-driven decision-making through digital transformation. They can establish new processes that leverage the value of existing data while capturing new data.

This requires the ability to create new workflows and manage old ones, in a way that doesn’t disrupt current business while accommodating new opportunities.

In a move seen as crazy by industry insiders, in 2011, Netflix committed $100 million to produce two full seasons of a TV series. Their data crunchers had analyzed viewing patterns of 33 million subscribers and were confident the show would be a hit. While major networks waited for Netflix to fail, House of Cards went on to become a huge success, winning Emmy and Golden Globe awards.

NBC didn’t understand the shift in user expectations in 2007. Netflix used data to defy accepted norms, investing in two seasons of shows and producing a massive success.

Publishers would be wise to learn from other content industries, recognize the power of shifting user expectations, and harness the power of data through digital transformation to create future value.

This post originally appeared in the October 11, 2017 Publishing Perspectives Show Daily Magazine (p. 21).

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Knowledge Engineering: The New Business-Value Accelerator in the Digital Transformation Journey http://www.copyright.com/blog/knowledge-engineering-new-business-value-accelerator-digital-transformation-journey/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/knowledge-engineering-new-business-value-accelerator-digital-transformation-journey/#respond Thu, 02 Nov 2017 20:00:57 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14738 A panel of experts discusses how knowledge engineering accelerates this digital transformation in three critical ways.

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Knowledge Engineering is the Next Leg of the Digital Transformation Journey. Scholarly publishers are on a technology journey to extend their content’s value and bring customers workflows that facilitate collaboration and deliver analytic insights. Industry experts Carl Robinson, Principal Consultant, Ixxus; and Babis Marmanis, VP and CTO, Copyright Clearance Center discuss how knowledge engineering accelerates this digital transformation in three critical ways — through comprehensive data analysis that provides insights to drive discovery; through management for authors and partners based on the analysis of their relationships; and through automated granular asset identification.

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Content Storage in Focus http://www.copyright.com/blog/content-storage-focus/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/content-storage-focus/#respond Thu, 24 Aug 2017 08:00:12 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=14035 Healthy content storage is the foundation of digital transformation.

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This is the second in an occasional series of posts designed to expand more fully on interviews with publishing industry leaders for a recent research report, “Industry Leaders’ Perspectives on the Digital Transformation Journey in Publishing.”

In a nutshell, “content storage” refers to the place where your files live. In any given office, this might include some combination of desktop folders, network drives, an intranet, a wiki, a CRM with file libraries, and, perhaps, a cloud system like Google Drive or Outlook 365.

The attitude is that content storage is old news – implementation of an enterprise-wide content storage solution required large sums of resources, and it didn’t even solve all the problems that it was supposed to.

The ideal content storage example would be a single, global, centralized file repository in the cloud, instead of patched together siloes and systems. This content storage location would hold content in all formats, from audio clips to XHTML files and everything in between. A cascading folder hierarchy would be consistent across the whole system. File names would follow strict conventions. Employees would share files in the cloud, and use live editing and versioning of each document, rather than cluttering the platform with duplicate copies.

Challenges

Creating and maintaining a content storage solution is demanding. Not only does a digital architecture need to be installed, but every member of the organization must buy in to the project. Everyone must comply with new rules about naming conventions, folder hierarchy, and file versioning.

Existing content storage solutions, which could involve thousands of files saved across countless devices, cloud systems, and even filing cabinets, must be retrofitted to plug into the new plan. It takes time, money, and lots of effort.

Benefits

But the benefits of content storage are legion. Healthy content storage is the foundation for digital transformation. Logical folder groups, consistent naming conventions and ‘one source of truth’ file versioning sets the stage for digital transformation to take full effect. In other words, the sleekest search tools in the world are worthless without good raw data to search.

Role in Digital Transformation Overall

Despite its vital importance, content storage was scored second-to-last by publishing executives in terms of importance to the future of their business, according to interviews conducted by Imbue Partners on behalf of CCC and Ixxus.

Conversations with and data from publishing industry leaders, as reported in “Industry Leaders’ Perspectives on the Digital Transformation Journey in Publishing,” imply that content storage has had its moment in the spotlight. Many publishers have already considered it, and come to varied conclusions. Some, for example, underestimated the complexity of content storage and embarked on a plan that turned out to be untenable. Others overestimated the challenges and concluded that efficient content storage just wasn’t worth the effort. Still others have already adopted some sort of storage solution, or they’ve assigned a committee to create a strategy to do so.

The attitude is that content storage is old news – implementation of an enterprise-wide content storage solution requires vast resources, and it might not even solve all the problems that it’s supposed to.

One interviewee told the Imbue researchers, “…where you store your content is not as important as your ability to access that information.”

The trouble is, the concepts of content storage and content accessibility are interdependent. It would be a shame to have a robust content storage platform with limited search capabilities; likewise, a sophisticated search won’t be of much use if the system’s data is a mess. No matter what, skipping the content storage phase will render the other phases of digital transformation useless. Metadata, discoverability, content agility and automated collaboration simply will not function without a solid content storage foundation in place.

For more on digital transformation, check out the first post in this series: The Definitive Guide to Digital Transformation, download the white paper “Industry Leaders’ Perspectives on the Digital Transformation Journey in Publishing,” or read up on best practices from Ixxus.

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The Definitive Guide to Digital Transformation http://www.copyright.com/blog/definitive-guide-digital-transformation/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/definitive-guide-digital-transformation/#respond Thu, 11 May 2017 18:58:21 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=12937 Digital transformation, defined: content storage, metadata, discoverability, content agility, and automated collaboration.

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Digital transformation is a controversial subject, despite the many benefits it conveys for publishers and their customers. When it comes to making systemic changes across their organization, publishers anticipate frustration, expense, and hugely complicated, multi-year implementation plans. Even agreeing on common definitions for the basic steps toward digital transformation can be convoluted, as evidenced by the recent study commissioned by CCC and Ixxus, Industry Leaders’ Perspectives on Digital Transformation.

Even agreeing on common definitions for the basic steps toward digital transformation can be convoluted, as evidenced by the recent study commissioned by CCC and Ixxus, Industry Leaders’ Perspectives on Digital Transformation.

Why Pursue Digital Transformation?

Based on interviews with 25 senior leaders of publishing organizations in the STM, Education, and Trade sectors, publishers today have three common goals which spur the industry toward the modern, large-scale technology adaptations known as digital transformation.

  1. Respond to consumer demand: Customers now expect easy, immediate, inexpensive access to content in many formats and across many channels.
  2. Create new revenue streams: MOOCs, self-publishing, new distribution channels, and digital competitors have significantly eroded book and journal revenue.
  3. Develop new product opportunities: Digitizing the back catalogue makes it easy to export existing content to new formats and markets, and in turn, to generate new revenue.

Digital Transformation, Defined

At CCC and Ixxus, we have identified the five essential steps in the digital transformation sequence: content storage, metadata, discoverability, content agility, and automated collaboration.

Content Storage

Essentially, content storage is the place where your content lives. Although the ideal example would be a single, global, centralized file repository in the cloud, most organizations currently rely on patched together siloes and systems. In any given office, this might include some combination of desktop folders, network drives, an intranet, a wiki, and, perhaps, a cloud system like Google Drive or Outlook 365.

Metadata

Metadata is short-hand for the use of software to apply labels or tags to files in an automated, systematic way. The tags enable quick browsing, making it possible to pull relevant files on demand. The largest barrier in this process is tackling publishers’ massive back catalogues.

Discoverability

There are two sides to discoverability: internal, as in the organization’s ability to locate content for production; and external, as in the end-user’s ability to find content. Machine-powered smart search can pull the materials you want, plus related materials that you didn’t even know were there. Another way to think of discoverability is like a roadmap that provides the most direct route to the content you need – avoiding too many sub-menus and extra clicks along the way.

Content Agility

Content agility results from the successful implementation of content storage, metadata, and discoverability practices. When those factors are in place, publishers can easily respond to external demands by identifying opportunities to reuse and repurpose content. This optimization can offer significant advantages to organizational information and assets, breathing new life into existing content.

Automated Collaboration

Automated collaboration overarches the other four elements of digital transformation. Internally, this can mean live-editing documents, e.g., enabling multiple staff members to work together on a shared spreadsheet. On a larger scale, think of linking content, e.g., changing a master file and prompting the same change to be made on every item derived from that file.

The Future is Now

Tech-savvy consumers are ready for digital transformation. They expect sophisticated searching abilities at their fingertips. They’re hungry for insightful content, regardless of publication date, delivered instantly in PDF, HTML, XML, or whichever file format comes next. They want access to automated collaboration tools for easy manipulation of content. Digital transformation is the means to those ends. It’s more than a trend – it’s a systemic shift in the content industry, and it’s here to stay.

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The Data Dilemma http://www.copyright.com/blog/the-data-dilemma/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/the-data-dilemma/#respond Thu, 04 May 2017 08:00:39 +0000 http://www.dev1.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=10859 Industry leaders say, ‘Data is the new oil’ and ‘Information is the new petroleum.’ Yet, data by itself has little meaning.

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Let’s start with the obvious question: what is data? From a publisher’s perspective, data is content within journals, books, articles, websites, and blog posts. Industry leaders tell us, ‘Data is the new oil’ and ‘Information is the new petroleum.’ Yet, data by itself has little meaning.

But that’s not the dilemma. Instead, it’s what to do with all that data. How can we use data to its full potential, deriving meaning and value from it?

How can we use data to its full potential, deriving meaning and value from it?

If we think of data less as the new oil and more as the land that contains the oil, the comparison becomes sharper. You suspect that an area of land holds something of value beneath the surface, be it oil, gas or a precious metal; your job is to get to it and capitalize on its value. In much the same way, publishers need to access and process data to reveal actionable insights and gain value.

Fortunately, businesses can now collect and analyze data with greater speed and in larger quantities than ever before. We have moved away from the limitations of structured data and toward the more open realms of sophisticated algorithms and the cloud. Such advances in technology have empowered us to extract real value from data, and the results have never been more in demand.

What’s standing in the way of understanding data? Our imaginations and our ability to innovate. We must transform these resources into real business value and give customers the information they need in ways that serve them best. Some publishers are doing this already, but most need to play catch-up.

Machines are great at processing data at lightning speed, but as yet no computer has formulated an original idea. For that, you need a uniquely human ingredient, gut instinct. Fortunately, intuition still has a place in the world of publishing. Machines are here not to replace us, but to help us and, in doing so, to make us more powerful.

According to World Economic Forum Executive Chairman Klaus Schwab, we are entering the Fourth Industrial Revolution. He states: “We stand on the brink of a technological revolution that will fundamentally alter the way we live, work, and relate to one another. In its scale, scope, and complexity, the transformation will be unlike anything humankind has experienced before.”

It’s no longer simply business as usual; it’s time to adapt and embrace the new. We face a dilemma: shall we watch from the sidelines or shall we start digging to unearth those resources, discover their value, and benefit from the possibilities?

Our world is changing, and we must change with it. Our willingness to tap into the value within our data will differentiate the pioneers from the laggards, the winners from the losers.

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The Road to Digital Transformation at London Book Fair 2017 http://www.copyright.com/blog/road-digital-transformation-london-book-fair-2017/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/road-digital-transformation-london-book-fair-2017/#respond Thu, 06 Apr 2017 13:54:32 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=12456 By 2020, 3 out of 4 businesses will undergo digital business transformations, but only 30% will prove successful.

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This year’s London Book Fair (March 13-16, 2017) included its trademark spirited discussions, and CCC was proud to join some of the most influential professionals in the industry in conversation. London Book Fair stands out as one of the most important content marketplace events in the world, which is why CCC continues to collaborate with them through sponsorship, panel moderation and speaking roles. Catch up on the four engaging and informative CCC- led panel discussions at the Fair now with the video or reading the transcript from each panel. The other panels are:

“This is not them and us. It’s not authors, researchers, librarians, publishers. We are in a continuum. And the only way we can get sensible evolution is if we evolve together at the same rate to solve the right problems.”–David Worlock

Watch it now: Checking-In on the Road to Digital Transformation

Heading down the road to digital transformation can feel like travelling without a guide or a map.  For a fix on the publishing industry’s latest digital transformation location, hear a panel of analysts and executives review the findings of a groundbreaking survey of leading publishers in the UK and around the world.  How far have we come? Is this a race? Who’s ahead? Will the journey ever end?”

Learn more about the panel participants:

Max Gabriel joined Taylor & Francis Group as Chief Technology Officer in 2015. In this role, he is responsible for technology strategy, delivery and operations for the group. Prior to joining Taylor & Francis, Max was CTO of Pearson India and Africa where he was responsible for digital transformation of these markets and successfully launched Pearson’s first tablet based learning product in India. Before joining Pearson, Max held senior technology leadership roles at Global Industry leaders such as Diageo, Pfizer, and JP Morgan Chase. Max actively mentors and advises several tech startups in the media and education domain.

Valentina Kalk is the director of the Brookings Institution Press. Based in Washington and founded in 1916, the Brookings Institution is a nonprofit public policy organization whose research focuses on governance, foreign policy, economics, development and metropolitan studies. Before joining Brookings, Valentina was head of United Nations Publications, where she led the digital transition of the UN’s publishing operations. Prior to moving to the UN, Valentina was managing rights and digital development for World Bank Publications. A philologist by background, Valentina moved from Italy to the United States in 1999.

David Worlock has over thirty years of experience as a Digital Strategist and Advisor in publishing. In 1985, David founded Electronic Publishing Services Ltd. (EPS), a research and consultancy company working with the digital content industry in developing strategies for products and markets in consumer and business sectors. Outsell, Inc acquired EPS in 2006. David chairs Outsell’s Leadership Councils, a member-service for over 150 CEOs and senior executives of media publishing and information-provider companies in the USA and Europe. Also, David is Senior Advisor at Quayle Munro, the independent mergers and acquisitions advisory firm, and a board member at Map of Agriculture, a big data start-up in agribusiness.

To read the transcript of the panel discussion, click here.

*via our subsidiary, Ixxus.

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Our Love Affair With Print http://www.copyright.com/blog/love-affair-print/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/love-affair-print/#respond Tue, 24 Jan 2017 08:00:26 +0000 http://www.dev1.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=10831 A recent survey revealed that 73% of Americans have read a book in the last year, but just 28% have read an e-book.

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Print is dead – long live print! This common war cry within the publishing industry reminds us of the persistence of printed publications. A recent Pew Research Center study on Americans’ reading habits is the latest piece of research to confirm that readers continue to prefer printed books to e-books.

The survey revealed that 73% of Americans have read a book in the last year, but just 28% have read an e-book. Per the study, “When people reach for a book, it is much more likely to be a traditional print book than a digital product.” The survey also revealed that many readers are hybrid readers – reading both print and digital.

A recent survey revealed that 73% of Americans have read a book in the last year, but just 28% have read an e-book.

Of course, print has a significant head-start on e-books and brings many advantages including a long distribution network and a simple (click-free) method of reading.

However, the digital book market can now be defined as well-established, so it would be interesting to discover what is making readers stick with print. Is it, for example, cost compared to perceived value of e-books that is putting them off? And then there’s the huge amount of digital content that is so readily available. Will e-book readership hold its own?

A short time ago, publishers placed a huge emphasis on digital, citing it as their main area of growth. However, all five of the big five publishers reported a drop in sales of e-books in the first half of 2016, a decline in e-book sales and e-readership that seems more than just a passing trend. Could it be a real cause for concern?

Perhaps readers will simply always love print. While e-book sales may be down, profits are up at the five big publishers. So perhaps it is time publishers reconsider their e-book strategies. Or perhaps they need to concentrate on a both-and approach, rather than either-or. Whether the solution lies in lower prices or better promotions is yet to be seen.

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