Author Experience – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com Rights Licensing Expert Mon, 24 Sep 2018 16:49:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.copyright.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/cropped-ccc-favicon-32x32.png Author Experience – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com 32 32 Handle with Care: Metadata in Scholarly Publishing http://www.copyright.com/blog/handle-with-care-metadata-in-scholarly-publishing/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/handle-with-care-metadata-in-scholarly-publishing/#respond Thu, 17 May 2018 08:00:41 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16543 Industry experts discuss the need for improved handling of crucial metadata throughout the scholarly workflow.

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It’s readily apparent that metadata is an essential part of scholarly publishing. So why do we let so much of this treasured commodity slip through our fingers over the course of the publication process?

Each portion of the publication lifecycle requires important metadata, but not all of this information is carried all the way through the workflow. Instead, much of it remains in the isolated silos in which it’s collected. Inera’s CEO Bruce Rosenblum notes, “There’s just form after form after form of metadata collected [in submission systems] and it’s amazing how little of that makes it through to the final XML or beyond.”

For example, did you know that ORCID IDs (i.e. author IDs) often don’t make it out of the submission system? And that when publishers produce XML from manuscripts, Ringgold IDs collected at submission for author affiliations are often lost, effectively expunging hugely important data from publisher records?

But the lack of synchronization across publication phases—and the subsequent loss of this important metadata—persists. Ringgold’s North American Sales Director, Christine Orr, comments, “It negatively impacts all kinds of things downstream, and results in a lack of discoverability, lack of inoperability between other systems, and the inability to really, truly analyze your author base.” And it makes the publication workflow rife with inaccuracies. Bruce Rosenblum notes, “If it’s not automatically integrated into the workflow, then it’s a much more manual process, and hence a potentially inaccurate process.”

This information matters to both publishers and funders. Having unbridled access to the complete set of metadata collected throughout the publication lifecycle would mean infinitely better information about not only authors but also grant appropriation. It would enable better business analysis by publishers and funders alike, and would help all stakeholders identify trends in areas like open access, measure the impact of funding and make more informed decisions. Rosenblum notes, “Publishers need to understand there’s a huge value in integrated metadata. And by integrated, I mean that its shareable across systems.”

So what are we—the scholarly publishing community—waiting for? We need to begin by handling our existing metadata with care. And we need to invest in building out metadata-handling processes—holistically and systematically— within our own organizations to prepare for additional standards on the horizon. Finally, we need commitment from stakeholders across the scholarly publishing industry to use these standard identifiers that are being lost most often; namely grant IDs, funder names and author and co-author affiliation IDs.

Let’s continue the conversation at this year’s SSP Meeting in Chicago. Join me and fellow industry experts (listed below) as we analyze the research workflow, identify gaps, and discuss pragmatic ways we can work together to make the publication workflow more seamless and beneficial for all stakeholders.

Hope to see you in Chicago.

SSP Session Information:

Session 1D
The Gift That Keeps on Giving: Metadata & Persistent Identifiers Through the Research and Publication Cycle

Thursday, May 31 at 10:30AM
Virtual Session

Christine Orr, Ringgold
Bruce Rosenblum, Inera
Sarah Whalen, AAAS
Mary Seligy, Canadian Science Publishing
Howard Ratner, Chorus
Jennifer Goodrich, Copyright Clearance Center

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Embracing the Digital Transformation in Publishing—and its Impact on Authors http://www.copyright.com/blog/embracing-the-digital-transformation-in-publishing-and-its-impact-on-authors/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/embracing-the-digital-transformation-in-publishing-and-its-impact-on-authors/#respond Fri, 11 May 2018 08:00:16 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16430 Digital transformation initiatives are all the rage in the publishing industry – but how does the author benefit from these strategic optimizations?

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As one game-changing tech-led disruption after another rocked the book trade, publishers raced to meet new opportunities (and new consumer expectations) generated by new ways of accessing content.

Companies in the publishing space are shifting to a system that can help them maintain a position of strength regardless of the next big innovation. The process is called digital transformation and, ultimately, it can improve the success of any author’s work. What is digital transformation, in a nutshell?

Digital Transformation Summed Up

It is a series of system and process changes within a business to maximize the efficiencies created by today’s technological landscape. The process includes five stages: content storage, metadata, discoverability, content agility and automated collaboration.

Content storage means leaving the patched-together siloes of desktop folders, network drives and shared-content systems such as Google Drive, and instead unifying the entire enterprise on a single, global, centralized file repository, often cloud-based. Sharing material between departments becomes a breeze, document version worries a thing of the past.

Metadata—a set of labels or tags that can be applied to files manually or, better yet, through automation—enables quick browsing for anyone in the system, using keyword searches and more advanced methods such as semantic search.

Discoverability signifies the ability to get the best, most relevant content as efficiently as possible. Content storage and metadata are the building blocks that enable discoverability to function. Discoverability can be a nuanced task, for example, making sure search results use contextual clues to surface the most appropriate material, or the ability to distinguish between homonyms.

Content agility enables organizations to respond to external demands for the fast and efficient reuse of valuable content. Regardless of publication date or original format, decades-old files in a digital transformation environment can be summoned and put into use as easily as brand new content.

Automated collaboration enables individuals to work together, with better results, on common tasks— for instance, live-editing the same master document. On an enterprise-wide level, content development becomes tidier and faster.

Serving the Author

What does digital transformation mean for authors? Writers win when their work is published faster, cleaner, with the widest possible reach, and with the longest possible lifespan. Digital transformation optimizes the ecosystem to achieve this.

In an optimized workflow, the editorial manager achieves superior oversight from manuscript to proof copy. Agile content and automated collaboration track the status of every piece of content, eliminating bottlenecks, fast-tracking the approval process and streamlining development.

When an entire company shares one system, that means faster production. Today’s pre-publication process is too manual. Content must be loaded into one system or software environment, developed, exported, then handed off to repeat the process with the next team. Automated collaboration and a strong content storage system brings the process into the 21st century.

In a publishing house that has embraced digital transformation, even workflows outside content production can benefit. Marketing and publicity teams use the agile content to leverage the best assets, while also improving campaign execution through automated collaboration.

Depending on your content and licensing agreements, your material could be chunked into modules available for repurposing. Tagging for metadata and optimizing for semantic search or text mining can make your content easy to discover and, in turn, to use. With a simple search, your content could surface as a candidate for anthologies, course packs or other content bundles.

The back catalog changes dramatically in the digital transformation environment. Without the restrictions of siloes or antiquated filing systems, years-old content can be surfaced and used just as content published yesterday would be. The optimized content can also be transitioned to whatever new device or reading platform comes next—none of last decade’s agony of turning print to e-books.

Digital transformation empowers publishers to be responsive in a demanding marketplace. Has your house made the commitment?

A version of this post originally appeared in The Bookseller.

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Join CCC at the STM U.S. Conference 2018 http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-stm-u-s-conference-2018/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-stm-u-s-conference-2018/#respond Thu, 05 Apr 2018 20:49:07 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16280 Join CCC and Ixxus in Philadelphia for the STM U.S. Conference 2018 from April 24-26, where publishers and other stakeholders gather to collaboratively answer the question, “What can we do better, together?”

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Join CCC and Ixxus in Philadelphia for the STM U.S. Conference 2018 from April 24-26, where publishers and other stakeholders gather to collaboratively answer the question, “What can we do better, together?”

Catch us at the following sessions:

The future of access, part 1: The platform play and seamless content syndication

April 25, 2018 at 3:15    
Moderated by Roger Schonfeld‪ (Ithaka S+R)‪
Participants: Gaby Appleton (Mendeley); Yann Mahé (MyScienceWork); Rob McGrath (Readcube); Roy Kaufman (Copyright Clearance Center)

The fate of the music business looms over STM publishers like darkening storm clouds. Content providers wonder who will be our Spotify? Where will users go to get a legal, seamless aggregated search and discovery experience and what sort of sustainable business models will emerge?

Mendeley and Readcube propose syndicating content and brokering institutional access directly in their researcher productivity tools and reporting usage back to publishers in support of existing business models (Distributed Usage Logging).   Search engines like Google Scholar & Dimensions are serving up content directly now, expanding on their traditional role of referring traffic to publishers – and using new services like MyScienceWork to fulfill a user’s requested article with legal, freely available versions online – even if the user doesn’t have access to the version of record.  What is the future of the publisher’s own platform in this scenario? How will these new efforts to create seamless access impact traditional aggregators like EBSCO, ProQuest, and the document delivery market (CCC)? And most importantly, how will libraries be brought along in all of this?

 

Round Table: How will STM Tech Trends 2022 affect YOUR business?

April 26, 2018 at 9:30
Moderated by Chris Kenneally, Copyright Clearance Center
Participants: IJsbrand Jan Aalbersberg (Elsevier); Gerry Grenier (IEEE); Phill Jones (Digital Science); Stacy Malyil (Wolters Kluwer)

In a round table discussion moderated by Chris Kenneally (CCC), 4 members of STM’s Future Lab Forum will express their views on how the Tech Trends of 2022 will start impacting our publishing business now. Come and listen to be prepared for the future.

 

More “must attend” session picks:

Interactive forum discussion: digital ethics and data literacy

April 26, 2018 at 11:00
Moderated by Kent Anderson (Redlink)
Participants: Susan E McGrego (Columbia Journalism School); Patrick Vinck (Harvard University)

Are algorithms and social media outsmarting us, surveilling us, feeding us fake facts and alternative news, defining our views and opinions? Kent Anderson (Redlink) will engage in an interactive discussion on stage with thought leaders in digital integrity on topics such as ethics of algorithms, data literacy, user interface design, technology deployments, and current practice and policies. A very interactive session – so we expect you and the rest of the audience to chip in.

The Future of Access, part 2: RA21, Resource access in the 21st century

April 26, 2018 at 3:45
Chaired by Julia Wallace (RA21) and Heather Flanagan (RA21)

RA21 is a joint project by STM and NISO to drastically improve access to content, especially for mobile and off campus use. Access to scholarly and academic content should be as easy as logging in on Facebook and Google (but with stronger support for user privacy).

In its first year, the RA21 project, in which over 50 organisations collaborate, gained enormous traction among libraries, vendors, federation operators, ID management organisations and of course publishers. The three co-chairs of the project, Chris Shillum (Elsevier), Ralph Youngen (ACS) and Meltem Dincer (Wiley) will update you on the initial results of the pilots in academic and corporate environments and discuss possibilities for applying this information to your services. This session includes an interactive panel on frequently asked questions.

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To Buy or Not to Buy: Proprietary vs. Packaged APC Solutions http://www.copyright.com/blog/buy-not-buy-proprietary-vs-packaged-apc-solutions/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/buy-not-buy-proprietary-vs-packaged-apc-solutions/#respond Thu, 10 Aug 2017 08:00:53 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=13928 Can publishers deliver APC infrastructure demanded by stakeholders in the OA ecosystem? Or should they find a partner?

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“Tools and standards are changing faster than companies can react,” warns McKinsey & Company in “Digitizing the Consumer Decision Journey.” In the field of Open Access publishing, this challenge is writ large. Between new business models from publishers, a growing network of relationships with institutions and funders, and requisite author expertise on article processing charge (APC) policies and practices, the landscape is complex and evolving rapidly.

It’s clear that publishers must examine their author programs with a focus on creating an integrated workflow between the editorial process and the payment of APCs. Publishers who undertake this introspection are faced with a critical question – the answer to which can mean the difference between prosperity or failure in the market: Can they deliver the infrastructure and service demanded by stakeholders in the OA ecosystem on their own with their existing systems? Or should they find a partner?

Publishers who undertake this introspection are faced with a critical question – the answer to which can mean the difference between prosperity or failure in the market: Can they deliver the infrastructure and service demanded by stakeholders in the OA ecosystem on their own with their existing systems? Or should they find a partner?

The “build versus buy dilemma,” of which this is but one example, is a perennial topic of debate in the field of software development. Conventional wisdom suggests that building your own solution may be the right decision in areas of key competitive advantage, or where there is no suitable commercial product to deliver your core business requirements. By contrast, buying is often a more cost-effective way to automate and standardize core business processes, and allows the organization to manage risk by transferring the burden of software development and maintenance onto a third party.

So, which of these scenarios applies in the case of the management of author fees? The answer depends on the needs of each organization, but when faced with a rapidly changing environment like Open Access publishing, McKinsey suggests many organizations need to adopt a different approach to managing the consumer decision journey — one that embraces the speed that digitization brings and focuses on capabilities in three areas: Discover, Design and Deliver.

Metadata and the Discover Phase

In the context of Open Access, the Discover phase entails drawing upon information to develop a full customer portrait such as:

  • the author
    • their country of origin
    • their institution
    • their funding sources
    • their membership status
  • the manuscript
  • the publication

Publishers are under growing pressure to capture and share industry standard metadata such as ORCiDs, ISNIs, DOIs, FundRef IDs and Ringgold IDs. Investment in interoperability of existing systems that contain data about authors and their institutions is critical. What’s more, publishers must find ways to allow external systems to draw on this information. Unfortunately, all too often, the information in question resides in disparate disconnected legacy systems which rely on proprietary identifiers rather than external data standards. Such systems are also ill-equipped to handle the high-volume, real-time transactions characteristic of OA. In order to develop a robust author-centric solution, publishers typically have to dedicate significant resources to both unifying legacy systems and building a new transaction system that can evolve with the marketplace and be ready for numerous emerging standards. A fully unified set of internal systems might be the ultimate goal, but it is likely to come at a high price in terms of development costs and management time. For this reason, an outsourced solution can often make more sense in a resource-constrained environment or where there is a need to deliver a solution within a shorter timeframe.

Publication and the Design Phase

The design phase is about creating a frictionless experience that uses the data gathered in the discovery phase to ensure interactions are expressly tailored to an author’s stage in his or her publication journey. Publishers have rightly identified that maintaining high levels of customer satisfaction among authors is critical in an Open Access model. In this new paradigm, authors cannot be kept at arm’s length from billing and payment processes, which now form an integral part of the author experience. This requires publishers to dramatically shift how their organizations operate — from a business-to-business (B2B) model centered on selling subscriptions to a business-to-consumer (B2C) model centered on managing an exponentially greater number of micro transactions for APCs. Furthermore, authors’ expectations of online payment solutions are very high, thanks to regular consumer interactions with digital titans like Amazon, Google and Apple – services which set the benchmark for a seamless user experience. Authors expect intuitive user interfaces (UIs) and robust workflows when they submit manuscripts and pay author charges. Manual or slow payment solutions that seem clunky and antiquated negatively impact an author’s perception of a publisher. Sophisticated algorithms are generally required to meet these expectations.

Collaboration and the Deliver Phase

Finally, the Deliver phase requires the creation of a more agile organization with the right people, tools, and processes. McKinsey highlights the need for cross-functional teams with “strong collaborative and communication skills and a relentless commitment to iterative testing, learning, and scaling — at a pace that many companies may find challenging.” For publishers, this means developing closer links among editorial, production, finance and operations teams who may hitherto have had little contact. To make it easy to support these cross-functional teams, a robust APC solution must offer simple management of complex pricing, discounting and compliance reporting. It should also be robust enough to test and implement promotional codes and discounts based on factors such as location of the author, institutional affiliation, subscription status of the institution, and membership status of the author, allowing publishers to iterate quickly in response to market demand. Flexibility is the key in this phase of activity, and any solution needs to accommodate this or risk undermining the organization’s capacity to evolve and develop.

Reaching A Decision

Careful consideration of these three factors can help publishers tease out some of the complexities in the build-versus-buy decision, which often comes down to an evaluation of the likely return on investment from each of the two options.  When developing a solid understanding of the potential long- and short-term costs and benefits in each case by testing the market for outsourced solutions and being realistic about the resource-draw of in-house development and ongoing maintenance (which are frequently under-estimated), don’t overlook the value of time-to-market, and agility once you get there. The ability to quickly shift technology strategies as the environment changes is often the difference between prosperity and obsolescence.

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Seven Steps to Help Your Authors Through the APC Maze http://www.copyright.com/blog/seven-steps-to-help-your-authors-through-the-apc-maze/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/seven-steps-to-help-your-authors-through-the-apc-maze/#respond Thu, 03 Aug 2017 18:55:05 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=13884 As Open Access has evolved, article processing charges (APCs) have become increasingly complex for authors to understand and manage.

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As Open Access has evolved, article processing charges (APCs) have become increasingly complex for authors to understand and manage. OA policies are now multi-dimensional, as funders, publishers and institutions have different requirements that don’t always align, and the range of licensing and copyright options can be bewildering.

The challenges start with choosing an outlet for publication, as open access authors juggle complying with funder and institutional guidelines and publishing in the journal best suited for their work or career aspirations. There’s also the issue of archiving the appropriate version of the paper in a repository. Researchers need to submit the necessary underlying information behind the article, and increasingly, the supporting research data. By the time it comes to payment, it’s often hard for authors to know whether fees can be offset against existing subscription charges, or even more simply, who pays – the author, funder or institution? And once submitted, who is responsible for tracking the processing and payment? The list of hurdles goes on and on…

What can institutions, intermediaries and publishers do to help them successfully and swiftly navigate the APC maze?

What’s more, the complexity is likely here to stay. Gold Open Access journals are doubling in article volume every four years, currently in excess of 14% of the total journal output, according to the Mellon Foundation-funded Pay It Forward report and the European Commission’s research into the proportion of peer reviewed OA articles. With no two academic disciplines adopting the same approach, authors are left to navigate a myriad of options and approaches.

In the spring of 2017, Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) held a roundtable discussion about the implications of Open Access on publishing workflows. Participants were drawn from across scholarly communication stakeholder groups, and there were some striking insights gained from the author perspective:

  • Authors lack time to read about or fully understand the multiple options open to them.
  • Discounts for authors that are society or association members add a new layer of complexity to the publishing workflow.
  • Authors receive varying levels of support from their institutions in managing the publication process and payment of APCs, reflecting different levels of staffing and resources at the university level.
  • The proliferation of different guidelines and use of too many technical terms create confusion.

Set this against a backdrop of research, teaching and institutional administration, and it’s no wonder that researchers struggle to keep track. What they need is a seamless experience, with a logical workflow process that allows them to get on doing what they should be doing: researching and disseminating results.

What can institutions, intermediaries and publishers do to help them successfully and swiftly navigate the APC maze?

These seven steps help to set a clear path:

  1. Communicate. Use clear, straightforward messaging. Make it easy to understand with clarity, succinctness and additional resources such as case studies and FAQs.
  2. Provide definitions. Guide authors through the different options in a clear and comprehensible way. Remove confusion among the roles of funders, institutions and publishers so they know who is responsible for what and when.
  3. Adopt a rules-driven workflow. Make it easy for authors to check funding and compliance requirements, or, better yet, adopt a rules-driven approach that minimizes the choices authors need to make during the payment workflow. Automate workflows wherever possible to create a frictionless experience.
  4. Track the progress. Make it easy to understand where a paper is in the submission and APC payment workflow. Help with reporting for authors. Clearly explain what they will (and won’t) be responsible for.
  5. Have a clear, user-driven interface. Use a simple design with an intuitive structure, removing any unnecessary features that might confuse.
  6. Integrate open tools. Connect with data hosts such as figshare, Dryad and Dataverse. Get the tech to do the heavy lifting using standards and metadata, such as ORCiD and Ringgold, to connect the dots.
  7. Automate article deposit (where appropriate). Make it easy and frictionless to facilitate automatic article – and data – deposit into repositories. Make sure all underlying metadata complies with funder and institutional policies to aid transparency, maximize discoverability and improve potential impact.

Based on stakeholder input, CCC is currently developing a range of new tools within RightsLink© for Open Access that aim to solve these issues. As global trends emerge, the conversation continues. The CCC team welcomes authors, librarians, funders and publishers to take part in the discussion by contacting Jennifer Goodrich, Director of Product Development (jgoodrich@copyright.com).

Related sources:

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Seeing the Author as the Customer http://www.copyright.com/blog/seeing-author-customer/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/seeing-author-customer/#respond Thu, 18 May 2017 13:30:36 +0000 http://www.dev1.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=10864 Author satisfaction is central to the success of OA. Should publishers build or buy the systems to provide an optimal experience?

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Build or buy?

Open Access (OA) publishing has brought with it so many new elements – new business models, new expertise related to Article Processing Charges (APCs), new relationships, and new support systems – that publishers are rethinking how they go about creating an integrated streamlined workflow. This dilemma is essentially whether they can deliver what is required by using existing systems (build) or by working with an outsourcing partner (buy).

As shoppers, we expect an Amazon-style experience in our online transactions; authors are no different.

Both pathways have benefits – building offers competitive advantages; buying helps minimize risk and is sometimes more cost-effective. But what does this choice entail in the context of managing author fees? According to an article by McKinsey & Company, the answer lies in a brand new approach to managing the customer-decision journey. This approach focuses on capabilities in three stages: Discover, Design, and Deliver.

Discover: At this stage, publishers gather as much information as possible to understand the customer profile fully. Besides finding out about the author, the manuscript, and publication, publishers are also under pressure to collect and share industry-standard metadata. Therefore, existing systems holding such data must work alongside external systems that can draw on this data. Legacy systems, however, are not generally known for their interoperability. Nor are they generally able to cope with the author transactions now being processed in high volumes and in real time. The most author-centric solution might be a unified set of internal systems (both legacy and new); yet such a set would cost both time and money. As a result, a more practical solution could present itself through outsourcing.

Design: Many publishers recognize customer satisfaction is central to the success of OA. This stage is all about creating a streamlined experience for the author that draws on the data already gathered. Authors are no longer removed from billing and payment processes. As shoppers, we expect an Amazon-style experience in our online transactions; authors are no different. Systems should be intuitive, innovative and driven by sophisticated algorithms. Get it wrong, and an author’s esteem for the publisher might wither.

Deliver: Agility and flexibility are key in this stage. For publishers, this means more collaborative, cohesive relationships among editorial, production, finance and operations teams. Processes such as pricing, discounting and compliance reporting should be fully supported and allow publishers to respond to demand.

The decision to buy or build will differ for each organization, but will often be clarified by potential ROI. Publishers should not only carefully evaluate the investment required to develop in-house systems, but also carefully consider the cost and performance of any external partners.

To buy or to build? That is the question. What’s best for your company?

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