Blog – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com Rights Licensing Expert Fri, 22 Jun 2018 15:26:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://www.copyright.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/cropped-ccc-favicon-32x32.png Blog – Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com 32 32 Why Open Access Publishing is Growing in Latin America http://www.copyright.com/blog/why-open-access-publishing-growing-latin-america/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/why-open-access-publishing-growing-latin-america/#respond Thu, 21 Jun 2018 08:00:35 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16790 Latin American researchers have a specific social commitment to ensure that their work is accessible and contributing to the good of their communities.

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The move towards open access publishing in scientific research is certainly a global one. However, Latin America or Iberoamérica, a larger community that includes Spanish- and Portuguese-language countries in both Europe and the Americas, is using the OA publishing model to a far greater extent than any other region in the world. Iberoamérican scientists especially are committed to the movement as a way to ensure that society benefits from their research.

Dramatic growth in repositories

The extent of OA’s adoption depends on who you ask but according to researcher Juan Pablo Alperin in his dissertation “The public impact of Latin America’s approach to open access, “it is evident that the degree of adoption of the OA models is fairly extensive [in Latin America], although there are no exact figures. The estimates range significantly, from as low as 51 per cent and one expert claiming closer to 95 per cent of all online journals being OA.”

However, a report recently published in Spanish by CERLALC, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation centre for the promotion of reading and publishing in Latin America and the Caribbean, uses OpenDOAR data to highlight the fact that currently there are 519 OA repositories in Iberoamérican countries, with Spain leading (22 per cent), followed by Brazil (19 per cent), Portugal (10 per cent), Peru (10 per cent), Colombia and Argentina (both with nine per cent).

Regardless of which numbers you turn to, OA’s growth in Iberoamérica has been dramatic over the past few years. As an example, the number of OA repositories in Peru went from eight in 2010 to 48 in 2018. In Argentina, they grew from six to 44 in the same time period and from 25 to 99 in Brazil.

University presses prefer OA, even for books

A recent study of 140 Latin American university presses conducted by Elea Giménez Toledo from the Spanish research council CSIC, and Juan Felipe Córdoba-Restrepo, president of the association of Colombian university presses, ASEUC, reveals that OA is gaining a tremendous interest among university presses as well.

For instance, 32 per cent of the university presses surveyed reported that their institutions have specific policies supporting OA, while another 35 per cent are in the process of developing them. Nevertheless, 63 per cent of respondents declared OA publishing programmes, which means that university presses are publishing in OA despite the lack of official policies in some cases.

Interestingly, OA increasingly covers books in Latin America, not only journals, as is the case in other parts of the world: almost half of the university presses publish books under an OA model.

Life sciences journals defend OA

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Scientific Electronic Library Online, a network of cooperative electronic publishers of scientific journals on the internet. Created in Brazil, today there are 13 Iberoamérican countries represented in SciELO’s journal collections, plus South Africa, with more than 1,200 active journals totalling approximately 750,000 articles.

Further evidence of the growing interest in OA and Open Science in Iberoamérica is the recent declaration in defence of OA issued by a large number of editors of life sciences journals in Spain.

Among other recommendations and requests, the declaration urges national research agencies to require their researchers to deposit their publications in institutional repositories and to reduce the emphasis of the journals’ impact index as a personal promotional tool.

Instead, it suggests that these journals promote new indicators related to the scientific content in articles instead of journal-related metrics.

Ultimately, the great diversity of publishing practices and institutional approaches account for the skyrocketing OA movement in Latin America, although regional economic constraints also play a role. Some believe traditional subscription models may restrict meaningful access to scientific knowledge in this part of the world.

On a cultural level, many Iberoamérican scientists hold a particularly resolute social commitment to OA, with a desire to lower any barriers between publicly funded scientific researchers and the benefits to society at large. Many researchers in Latin American countries also hope that OA-based dissemination methods for their work will help improve its visibility and impact on a global basis.

 

This post originally appeared in Times Higher Education.

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How the FDA Plans to Modernize New Drugs Review Process http://www.copyright.com/blog/fda-new-drugs-review-process/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/fda-new-drugs-review-process/#respond Tue, 19 Jun 2018 07:05:10 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16777 The FDA wants to empower the agency’s scientists and medical officers to take on more “thought leadership." Here's how they plan to do it.

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Less than a month after President Trump announced his plans to address the high cost of medicines in America, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has said it wants to shorten approval times for life-changing generic drugs.

The new steps are part of a proposed “modernization of FDA’s drug review office,” better known as the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER).

In a written statement, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said the primary aim of the proposed changes is to empower the agency’s scientists and medical officers to take on more “thought leadership” in their respective fields.

Functional and structural changes to the CDER proposed

Speaking at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago, the world’s biggest cancer conference, Gottlieb acknowledged that it’s only fair that those firms investing a lot of money in a breakthrough should have an opportunity to maximize their return on investment. But, he’s quoted by Reuters as saying that market monopolies “shouldn’t last forever.”

The commissioner believes the proposed changes would speed up approvals of cheap generic medicines, providing greater economic incentive for companies to be the second, third or even fourth to market.

The proposals include both functional and structural changes to CDER, with the aim of improving organizational efficiency and streamlining the agency’s review process.

One of the changes being considered is the creation of new therapeutic-specific divisions “that’ll have more ability to engage in discrete areas of medicine,” Gottlieb said in his statement. This aims to provide greater scientific leadership to academic, industry and patient groups.

“We’ll then staff these different divisions in a way that matches our manpower to the flow of applications and critical tasks, like post-market safety,” he said.

It is the functional changes, however, that will ultimately drive the improvements, the commissioner anticipates. The starting point is a common review template that’s “more easily collaborated around.”

“We want to make the entire review process more integrated across the discrete areas of science and regulatory expertise that are critical components of informing our overall mission,” he said the statement.

He suggested that simply ensuring key review memos are better organized will drive significant improvement, as it will free-up experts to spend more time on advancing scientific work in their fields.

The FDA estimates that the proposed new alignment and processes will improve organizational efficiency by a minimum of 20% – a result of better workflow and workforce management and greater internal collaboration across the different review functions.

Pharma industry’s reaction

Following Gottlieb’s speech at ASCO, Reuters spoke to a number of cancer drug executives who expressed some uncertainty about whether the changes are entirely necessary.

Liz Barrett, former global president of oncology at Pfizer Inc., who heads up Novartis’ cancer operations, suggested that oncology has been “very competitive” in each class over the past few years.

Roy Baynes, head of global clinical development at Merck & Co., agreed that competition was not a problem in the field of cancer treatment. “If you’ve got good data, there is no barrier to getting approved,” he said. “It is in everyone’s interest to get medicines as quickly as possible.”

As the Reuters article notes, however, choice does not always drive down prices, with the cost of new cancer immunotherapies remaining high despite intense competition.

Related Reading:

 

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18 Inspiring Tweets from #SLA2018 http://www.copyright.com/blog/inspiring-tweets-from-sla2018/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/inspiring-tweets-from-sla2018/#respond Thu, 14 Jun 2018 18:05:21 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16733 Couldn’t attend Special Libraries Association’s annual conference in Baltimore this year? Have no fear – we’ve rounded up some of our favorite bite-sized tips, session snippets and inspiration from the show:

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For a conference set in downtown Baltimore, it was fitting that Special Libraries Association’s 2018 annual show theme was “B More.”

Throughout the week, information professionals attended sessions that encouraged them to “B More Flexible,” “B More Curious,” “B More Inspired,” and “B More of a Leader.”

As opening keynote speaker, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden, pointed out – information professionals are uniquely positioned to “B More” in today’s climate.

“The appetite for ‘the real thing’ is growing,” Carla said. That means information professionals need to “join together, break down barriers, and create a network of accurate, useful information.”

Closing keynote speaker, bestselling author Wes Moore, echoed this sentiment, noting librarians are “keepers of the stories, keepers of hope, keepers of culture.”

Couldn’t attend Special Libraries Association’s annual conference in Baltimore this year? Have no fear – we’ve rounded up some of our favorite bite-sized tips, session snippets and inspiration from the show:

Keep exploring the Velocity of Content blog:

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How to Achieve Digital Dexterity: 4 Elements of Focus http://www.copyright.com/blog/what-is-digital-dexterity/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/what-is-digital-dexterity/#respond Tue, 12 Jun 2018 06:34:31 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16700 Most large companies are not known for being nimble and agile. So how can these organizations develop the dexterity to compete in today's digital age?

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The term “digital transformation” is in vogue as many organizations turn to digital technologies to re-invent their customer experiences, improve internal operations, or build new businesses. Leaders must consider new options for how to organize, as well as how to operate or what to produce, to truly maximize the benefits of their digital tools and capabilities.

Digital initiatives to improve business operations or the customer experience, for example, can trigger major organizational design changes, such as reorganizing departments and assigning new responsibilities. And, while jobs can be replaced, and new skills can be acquired, these efforts are neither fast nor easy.  Moreover, as technologies continue to advance, leaders may find themselves in the same predicament one year or even one month after adopting new technologies, needing to adjust organizational design repeatedly to meet strategic goals.

Long-lasting digital transformation advantages come only from developing the dexterity to rapidly and continuously self-organize apace with advancing digital technologies.

Developing Dexterity to Compete in a Digital Age

Digital dexterity is the sustained organizational capability to fluidly and dynamically reconfigure and deploy both human and digital resources at the speed of rapidly changing technological and market conditions. Digital dexterity comes not just from technology, but from people using digital technologies to think, act, and organize themselves in new and productive ways.

Digital dexterity comes not just from technology, but from people using digital technologies to think, act, and organize themselves in new and productive ways.

Most large companies are not known for being nimble and agile. So how can these organizations develop the digital dexterity to compete in this age? Alongside my colleagues at MIT, we conducted a multi-method study to investigate the experience of digital transformation from an organizational perspective. As part of this research, we surveyed 299 professionals, managers and higher-level representatives in 146 organizations operating in multiple industries and in over 30 countries. This research revealed not one single practice, but rather four interrelated characteristics, that position organizations to respond with digital dexterity to successive waves of future innovation over the long term.

1. A Digital Mindset

A digital mindset is an attitude reflecting a tendency to seek out digital solutions, use technology as a tool for competitive advantage, and approach enterprise data in a systematic fashion for customers, partners, and employees. When employees and managers instinctively turn to their digital tools and data to improve processes or create new products, they reap the benefits of speed and connectedness more often.

Our survey results showed that the presence of a digital mindset is significantly and positively associated with digital dexterity. Organizations in our dataset with the highest levels of digital dexterity exhibited, on average, measures of digital mindsets that were 12% higher than organizations with average levels of digital dexterity, and 30% higher than organizations displaying the lowest level of digital dexterity.

People with digital mindsets aspire to innovate with technology, believe their aspirations are attainable, and actively experiment with digital solutions. As they experience and publicize success with these solutions, favorable attitudes start to cascade through the larger organization. New mindsets inform subsequent decisions and practices.

For instance, leaders may invest more in data quality or in gathering additional data. They also may try to develop stronger analytical capabilities or expand their workforce with specialized or complementary skillsets.

2. Key Digital Practices

Many organizations are starting to digitize their operations. But what really makes a difference regarding digital dexterity is the degree to which organizations subsequently engage in collaborative learning and data-driven decision-making.

  • Collaborative learning involves teamwork and partnering without regard to discipline, geography, ownership or other traditional parameters, and ensures that insights and solutions move rapidly and readily across boundaries.
  • Data-driven decision-making means consistently using data – rather than intuition or the highest paid person’s opinion (“HiPPO”) — to guide decisions.

From our survey, we found both data-driven decision-making and collaborative learning are positively associated with digital dexterity. Organizations in our dataset with the highest levels of digital dexterity recorded, on average, collaborative learning measures that were 17% higher than organizations with average levels of digital dexterity and 46% higher than organizations displaying the lowest level of digital dexterity. Similarly, high dexterity organizations showed data-driven decision-making measures that were 18% higher than average dexterity organizations and 50% higher than the lowest dexterity organizations.

Our case research points to the valuable role of collaborative learning in helping traditional companies cultivate favorable attitudes and beliefs about digital transformation throughout their organizations. Once in place, these shared mindsets, along with shared norms of using data and dispersing knowledge, facilitate receptiveness to flexible and fluid ways of working—unhindered by differences in expertise, role, status or affiliation.

3. An Entrepreneurial and Engaged Workforce

As routine and well-bounded tasks become automated, the remaining roles for the workforce become more creative, open-ended and non-routine.  Our survey found that key success characteristics of this workforce include technology experience, and digital skills, but particularly high engagement. Engagement is evident in competence, motivation and self-direction.

Our survey revealed that many organizations believe they have the necessary technical experience. However, organizations with high levels of digital dexterity are far ahead on digital skills (24% higher than average dexterity organizations; 54% higher than lowest level dexterity organizations) and engagement (16% and 36% higher than average- or low-dexterity organizations, respectively).

The combination of collaborative learning norms and an entrepreneurial, engaged workforce is crucial for developing digital dexterity. Collaborative learning can support all workers in building skills, competence, and the perspective to guide entrepreneurial effort. Organizational leaders can help by setting clear goals, encouraging boundary-spanning collaboration, providing liberal access to relevant information, and then trusting their workers to bring the best expertise to bear for each challenge.

4. Data and Tools

Unsurprisingly, the fourth support for digital dexterity comprises assets such as digital tools and data. When skills, competence and engagement are established, the easy availability of data and communication tools complement performance-related outcomes.

In our dataset, organizations with high levels of digital dexterity stood out from those with average or low levels of digital dexterity on measures of data availability (16% higher than average; 33% higher than lowest dexterity organizations) and collaborative tools (20% higher than average; 51% higher than lowest dexterity organizations).

Access to quality data (i.e. timely, accurate, and complete data) is central to digital transformation. Accurate and timely data aids workers in improving internal business operations and responding effectively to customer demands. As workers realize the benefits of data-driven outcomes, they use data-driven approaches more consistently, creating a virtuous cycle.

Access to effective communication, collaboration, and coordination tools are also crucial for facilitating the key practices of collaborative learning and decision-making, and supporting the social connections that build engagement.

Digital Dexterity: The Leader’s Role

Astute digital leaders try to embed these elements in their organizations, to support and optimize their digital investments. However, leaders cannot mandate the development of values and norms such as collaboration, self-organization, and entrepreneurial engagement. Instead, leaders must cultivate the conditions that encourage new mindsets and practices:

  • Foster a digital mindset through leading by example.
  • Build consensus about responsibilities without regard to traditional boundaries and roles.
  • Model and encourage collaborative interaction and continuous learning.
  • Visibly practice and require data-driven decision-making.
  • Provide access to key digital resources and publicly acknowledge their effective use.

In sum, strong top-down leadership is important but should be exercised with a subtle hand.

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Blockchain for Science: Part One – A Primer http://www.copyright.com/blog/blockchain-for-science-part-one-a-primer/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/blockchain-for-science-part-one-a-primer/#respond Thu, 07 Jun 2018 09:59:56 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16650 Joris van Rossum, Director of Special Projects at Digital Science, shares his views on the ways blockchain could be a game changer in the ecosystem of scholarly publishing.

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Blockchain, the technology behind Bitcoin, offers a peer-to-peer network for trust that potentially can disintermediate traditional brokering authorities like banks, notaries – and perhaps even publishers. Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) and the International Council for Scientific and Technical Information (ICSTI) hosted a webinar led by industry experts to investigate what opportunities blockchain has to offer in the scholarly publishing world.

Panelist Joris van Rossum, Director of Special Projects at Digital Science, recently authored a research report investigating the new possibilities of blockchain. Below, Joris shares his own views on the ways blockchain could be a game changer in the ecosystem of scholarly publishing.

Scholarly Communications: A Challenging Landscape Ripe for Change

Within the academic publishing ecosystem, there are a number of fundamental challenges with which all stakeholders wrestle in some capacity. The deficient state of research reproducibility impacts publishers, authors, funders, and institutions. Integral to the core values of scholarship and the efficiency of acquiring knowledge, reproducibility is central to rigorous scholarly communication, and yet current practices, methods, and models hinder it significantly.

In a similar way, the community also suffers from poor transparency into the peer review process, along with a lack of recognition for the fundamental and important work done by reviewers. Metrics for evaluating research and researchers, largely directed by the original constraints of print publishing, are also limited and outdated.

In a more macroscopic capacity, the industry as a whole is experiencing a commercial crisis of sorts, having yet to hit upon a business model that is sustainable for all parties well into the future.

A Cryptocurrency for Science

So, what is blockchain and how might it prove useful for scholarly communications? The most well-known application of blockchain is, of course, cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin – digital assets designed to work as a medium of exchange that use encryption to secure transactions, to control the creation of additional units, and to verify asset transfer.

What if we were to leverage blockchain to create a digital currency specifically for science? How might we use it? Some new organizations, such as Scienceroot, Pluto, and Einsteinium, envision a future in which the academic publishing ecosystem is driven by a closed token-based economy. Publishers, for example, might choose to grant all contributing peer reviewers digital ‘tokens,’ which researchers could then redeem for services, content, or even funding, bringing value and recognition to an exchange that is vital to scholarly communications yet currently asymmetrical.

From Information to Value

Another key feature of blockchain technology is that it excels at establishing ownership and preventing duplication – functions just as pertinent to banking as to scholarly communications. In the area of data rights management (DRM) for example, blockchain is well positioned to automate rights and permissions management, including the payment of royalties, when combined with smart contracts.

In this same vein, blockchain also opens the way for new business models apart from subscriptions, tokens, and open access, by making direct micropayments between two parties very easy. This new reality might look something like researchers paying small fees directly to publishers for each research article they download.

The Promise of a Single Science Repository

At a more fundamental level, blockchain is about data storage – but a very special variety. Unlike many other mechanisms we have today, blockchain is de-centralized and distributed, meaning that no one particular entity owns or controls it. Instead of a server in your office, or a system maintained in the cloud, data is divided into small pieces and scattered over a vast network. Hacking becomes nearly impossible, because there is no single point of entry. Data held in blockchain is also immutable and transparent while simultaneously remaining pseudonymous – a perfect foundation for a singular scientific data store. A data trail of research, from the point of submission all the way through to subsequent citation in other works, would enable the protection of IP and assignment of credit, the development of more sophisticated research evaluation metrics, and enhance reproducibility.

Taking Action

A handful of players are already hard at work to capture the potential blockchain has for the research process. ARTiFACTS, a new start-up, is tackling this concept of a “ledger of record for research,” that traces all transactions and linkages across all research artifacts, published or pre-published. Similarly, a collaborative effort between Springer Nature, Aries Editorial Manager, Katalysis, and ORCiD, known as the Peer Review Blockchain Initiative, initiative aims to look at practical solutions that leverage the distributed registry and smart contract elements of blockchain technologies. Later phases aim to establish a consortium of organizations committed to working together to solve scholarly communications challenges that center around peer review.

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3 Takeaways for Pharma Orgs from President Trump’s ‘American Patients First’ Speech http://www.copyright.com/blog/3-takeaways-trumps-american-patients-first-speech/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/3-takeaways-trumps-american-patients-first-speech/#respond Tue, 05 Jun 2018 06:57:59 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16669 Analysts can’t decide whether the “American Patients First” program will serve U.S. consumers well in the long run, but most agreed that the administration is right in attempting to tackle the complex and important issue of drug prices.

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There was a lot to take in from President Trump’s speech last month about his plans to address the high cost of medicines in America. In general, analysts can’t decide whether the “American Patients First” program will serve U.S. consumers well in the long run, but most agreed that the administration is right in attempting to tackle the complex and important issue of drug prices.

For the industry, the proposals could be cause for concern. But, the prevailing view was that pharma’s biggest fears – such as empowering Medicare to directly negotiate drug prices and allowing Americans to import drugs – were averted.

Here are three takeaways from the speech:

Price vs innovation

President Trump opened the speech by promising, “tougher negotiation, more competition, and much lower prices at the pharmacy counter,” and said that it won’t be very long before the market starts to reflect this new strategy.

Whenever you contemplate measures that will cut into an industry’s profits, however, there’s a need to consider the knock-on effect on innovation. With less incentive to manufacture pioneering products, commercial sense says to spend fewer resources on research and development. This is a particularly dangerous game to play with pharma, as it could mean that companies curb investments in potentially life-changing drugs, such as cures for Alzheimer’s or cystic fibrosis.

On the flip side, cutting the price of drugs will increase access to them; potentially saving or extending the lives of people who have been out-priced in the current market.

As Mark Pauly, Wharton professor of health care management, put it in a discussion on SiriusXM, “Lives will be lost [if new drugs aren’t developed], but lives are also lost by overpriced drugs when people don’t have access to them.”

Related Reading: Drug Repurposing, Rare Diseases and Semantic Analytics

Drugs ads to include price

Another one of the measures being pursued by the administration is to order drug makers to disclose the cost of their medicines in their television advertisements. Speaking after the president, Health Secretary Alex Azar said the Food and Drug Administration would immediately examine requiring that information in TV ads.

The notion that drug commercials should include a price appears to make sense, as it could pressurize drug makers into dropping their prices over fears of a consumer backlash.

In practice, however, it’s unclear which price would need to be advertised, be it the list price that pharmacies would charge, or the discount price that insurers and employers pay. If the requirement is to post the higher sticker price, this could dissuade patients seeking out a necessary drug, notes the New York Times.

Walking the patent tightrope

The pharma industry has become well-known for holding on to patent protection for as long as it can; staving off generic competition so it can continue to charge a premium price for drugs.

However, President Trump has suggested he will come down on those companies who exploit US patent law. But, he acknowledges that there’s a balance to be found between preventing, exploiting and enabling innovation.

“Our patent system will reward innovation, but it will not be used as a shield to protect unfair monopolies,” he said.

This fits with the administration’s plans to allow easier entry for generics, although the president didn’t go into detail on how he plans to negotiate the patent tightrope.

In fact, all the proposals put forward were devoid of detail. The administration will no doubt go about fleshing them out in the coming weeks and months.

 

Related Reading: FDA Proposed New Knowledge Management System to make Drug Development More Efficient

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Open Access Must-Reads, Spring 2018 http://www.copyright.com/blog/open-access-must-reads-spring-2018/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/open-access-must-reads-spring-2018/#respond Thu, 31 May 2018 09:27:37 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16642 Together with the Association for Learned and Professional Publishing (ALPSP), Copyright Clearance Center is excited to share the Spring 2018 edition of the “Open Access Must-Reads” series – a thoughtfully curated selection of important articles from the past few months that expound upon “can’t miss” developments in the world of Open Access.

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Together with the Association for Learned and Professional Publishing (ALPSP), Copyright Clearance Center is excited to share the Spring 2018 edition of the “Open Access Must-Reads” series – a thoughtfully curated selection of important articles from the past few months that expound upon “can’t miss” developments in the world of Open Access.

1) ‘Bronze’ open access supersedes green and gold

A recent survey of 100,000 articles sampled from the CrossRef database has revealed that the largest share of OA articles belongs to a new category described as “bronze” (or less accurately as ‘delayed OA’) – open-access articles available on websites hosted by their publisher but not licensed for reuse.  Without a license, articles are free to read, but can’t be redistributed or reused, for example, in presentations or course material, severely curtailing their use.

2) Europe’s open-access drive escalates as university stand-offs spread

Sweden joins Germany and the Netherlands as the latest country to hold out on journal subscriptions. In the background, librarians from other countries are sharing negotiation strategies to broker new deals with publishers aimed at accelerating the progress of the open access movement.

3) Open-access charges ‘create new inequalities’ in publishing

A global shift towards open-access publishing is opening up new types of inequality within academia, according to research that highlights institutional “stratification” in publishing access outcomes. There appears to be evidence supporting the existence of a class division between universities, whereby researchers from lower-ranking institutions with fewer resources are often left with little choice but to publish in closed-access journals.

4) EU appoints special envoy on OA

The European Union has appointed Robert-Jan Smits as its Special Envoy on OA. Previously he was the Director General for Research, Science and Innovation. In an interview with him in Horizon (the EU Research and Innovation Magazine) he states that he has been tasked with making policy recommendations by October 2018 that will enable OA to all funded research by 2020.

5) Update to Analysis of Open Data Policies finds new activity around OA in multiple countries

SPARC Europe updated its analysis of open data policies. Of the 28 EU member states, 11 have national research data policies, and most of these are owned by national research funders and apply to grant recipients. New activity around national approaches to open data and open science has been identified in several countries, notably the Czech Republic, Hungary, Serbia and Sweden.

6) OA policy reviews in the UK

Two organizations in the UK have indicated they will be undertaking internal reviews of their OA policy in 2018.

A new body, UK Research and Innovation was established, bringing together the UK Research Councils and part of HEFCE, now renamed Research England. UKRI has announced plans to review current HEFCE and RCUK OA policies over the next 12 months, emphasizing the need to consider: evidence-based insights; sustainable business models; funding of APCs in hybrid journals; demonstration of value added by OA; double dipping. While UKRI is publicly funded, it appears to have chosen to conduct its review without public consultation at the present time.

Wellcome also announced a review of its OA policy, to be completed before the end of 2018. It states that the review is intended to ensure that the cost of delivering the policy is ‘fair and proportionate,’ and that the policy supports its goals, whilst being as clear and unambiguous as possible.

Other Recommended Reading:

Open Access Must-Reads, Winter 2018 

Open Access Must-Reads, Fall 2017

Open Access Must-Reads, Spring 2017

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2 Can’t-Miss Sessions at the 2018 Special Libraries Association Annual Conference http://www.copyright.com/blog/sla-2018-conference-ccc-sessions/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/sla-2018-conference-ccc-sessions/#respond Wed, 30 May 2018 08:11:12 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16616 Info pros - will you be heading to Baltimore in June to attend #SLA2018? CCC will be at Booth #734. Stop by and say hello!

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Heading to Baltimore in June to attend #SLA2018?

CCC will be alongside upwards of 2,500 attendees at the Special Libraries Association (SLA)’s annual conference for information professionals, from June 9-13.

Featuring more than 100 educational sessions and workshops, SLA will host three keynote speakers:

  • Carla Hayden, the 14th and current Librarian of Congress,
  • Sayeed Choudhury, the Associate Dean for Research Data Management and the Hodson Director of the Digital Research and Curation Center at the Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins University, and
  • Wes Moore, an Army combat veteran and New York Times bestselling author.

Sessions and themes will be focused around data management and curation, leadership and metrics, analytics, and assessment.

CCC is excited to sponsor two can’t-miss sessions throughout the week. Here’s a look at the details:

The Evolving Global Information Manager: Staying Ahead of the Curve

June 11, 2:15 pm

Featuring Industry Experts:

  • Blanca Chou, Director, Information Resource Center, Otsuka Pharmaceutical
  • Jill Shuman, Head, Library and Knowledge Management Center, Shire
  • Michelle Drabik, Sr. Manager, Intellectual Capital Management, Honeywell UOP
  • Moderator: Lauren Tulloch, Vice President of Product, Copyright Clearance Center

The role of today’s information manager is undoubtedly changing. While juggling responsibility for their organization’s content assets, analyzing usage and keeping spending within budget, information managers now face more pressure to support business decision-making across their global enterprise. What tools, technologies and strategies are needed to stay ahead of the curve? Join CCC and our panelists from Shire, Honeywell and Otsuka for unique perspectives on the evolving role of the information manager.

Going Global: 7 Information Management Considerations to Keep in Mind

June 12, 9:00 am

Featuring Industry Experts:

  • Blanca Chou, Director, Information Resource Center, Otsuka Pharmaceutical
  • Rosalind Young, Information Specialist, Otsuka Phamaceutical
  • Lisa Benz, Senior Client Engagement Manager, Copyright Clearance Center

Extending information services across the globe is a top priority for many organizations. But given limited resources, how can corporate information managers overcome both the human and technological barriers of a geographically-diverse workforce? In this session, join us to learn how a small information team at Otsuka Pharmaceutical successfully implemented a customized information system for over 35 key affiliates in 18 countries – without a mandate from the top.

SLA ’18 Expo Hours:

  • Monday, June 11 – 12 to 7 p.m.
  • Tuesday, June 12 – 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
  • Wednesday June 13 – 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

CCC will be at Booth #734. Stop by and say hello!

Can’t attend SLA? Follow the action on Twitter using the hashtag #SLA2018. Connect with SLA and CCC for up-to-the-minute dispatches from the conference.

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The Content Liberation Movement Comes to BookExpo America 2018 http://www.copyright.com/blog/the-content-liberation-movement-comes-to-bookexpo-america-2018/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/the-content-liberation-movement-comes-to-bookexpo-america-2018/#respond Fri, 25 May 2018 19:47:28 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16628 A core theme of this year’s BookExpo is increasingly dynamic content consumption, and the new models and tools needed to keep pace – a common challenge among publishers, and one to which Renee Swank of Ixxus is no stranger.

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Copyright Clearance Center and Ixxus are excited to participate in the 2018 “edition” of BookExpo America, taking place May 30 – June 1, 2018 in New York City at the Javits Center. More than just a tradeshow, BookExpo is where all those who play a key part in the publishing industry – authors, booksellers, distributors, librarians, technology partners, publishers and more – unite to share insight, learn about tools needed to grow business, and get the pulse of what’s trending in today’s shifting marketplace.

The Drawbacks of Traditional Publishing Workflows

A core theme of this year’s meeting is increasingly dynamic content consumption, and the new models and tools needed to keep pace – a common challenge among publishers, and one to which Renee Swank of Ixxus is no stranger. With 25+ years’ experience in content publishing and knowledge management, Renee has an extensive track record helping organizations drive business transformation to support content enrichment processes, as well as new ways to discover, search, and analyze content. “Even in an increasingly digital age, in many cases publishers are still relying on a workflow that confines their business by revolving around a specific format – the print book,” says Renee. “It becomes very difficult, if not impossible, to deliver content in innovative, high value ways – especially on mobile devices.”

Content Liberation – A Movement for Profitability and Sustainability

So, what’s the trick to breaking down the barriers, liberating your content, and securing the flexibility required to stay competitive? Renee and her colleagues at Ixxus know it all starts with a format-agnostic workflow: “Whether you’re mixing and matching pieces of existing content in new ways to drive revenue from new markets, or increasing efficiencies by pushing content to different platforms or formats all in one go, digital-first processes, and the associated mentality, have a direct, measurable impact on business performance.”

Learn More at the Can’t-Miss Panel

Learn more about digital transformation accelerators that can help editors and executives manage more effectively the full lifecycle of book and related content from editorial through publication, and beyond during The Content Liberation Movement panel on Thursday, March 31, 2018, 11:00 AM – 11:50 AM, Location 1E16, where Renee joins fellow panelists Max Riggsbee, Co-founder of Gadget Software, and Ankur Laroia, Leader of Solutions Strategy at Alfresco.

Additional Must-Attend Sessions

Covering Books from Cover to Cover
Friday, June 1st, 2018
11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Location 1E16

CCC’s Chris Kenneally hosts a panel of influential journalists and analysts who cover national and international book markets. From the challenges of online commerce to bestseller lists dominated by authors with internationally-recognized brands, book markets in the United States, United Kingdom, and across Europe have much in common. Of course, national differences remain in spite of globalization. Apart from cultural preferences and languages, price discounting, which is a feature of US and UK markets that’s taken for granted, is forbidden by law in France, Germany and elsewhere. Panelists will discuss where they see room for more common ground.

State of the Industry: Publishing and Copyright Policy
Thursday, May 31st, 2018
10:15 AM – 11:00 AM
Location 1E12/1E13/1E14

Some of the most influential voices in copyright policy – Maria A. Pallante, President and CEO of the Association of American Publishers; Mary Rasenberger, Executive Director of the Authors Guild; and Keith Kupferschmid, CEO of the Copyright Alliance – explore the equities of copyright law as they relate to authors, publishers, and other aspects of the public interest, from the promise of global digital commerce to the evolving legal landscape in the courts and on Capitol Hill.

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Join CCC in Chicago at SSP’s 40th Annual Meeting http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-in-chicago-at-ssps-40th-annual-meeting/ http://www.copyright.com/blog/join-ccc-in-chicago-at-ssps-40th-annual-meeting/#respond Thu, 24 May 2018 08:00:15 +0000 http://www.copyright.com/?post_type=blog_post&p=16600 With topics ranging from metadata to OA to computer-assisted mining in scholarly publishing, the CCC team picks their favorite sessions at this year's 40th SSP Meeting in Chicago.

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SSP’s 40th Annual Meeting, one of the premier forums for discussion amongst scholarly publishers, librarians and academics, is right around the corner. This year’s theme, “Scholarly Publishing at the Crossroads: What’s working, what’s holding us back, where do we go from here?” highlights both the uncertain nature of our industry’s future as well as the great opportunities that lie ahead for us.

You can find CCC at Booth #211, and catch our photo booth at the 40th Anniversary Celebration at the Navy Pier. My colleagues and I will be at the show and wanted to share some of our “can’t miss” sessions at this year’s conference:

Jen Goodrich, Director of Product Management

Session 4D – Making Metadata Work for Everyone: A Functional View of Metadata in the Scholarly Supply Chain (Thursday 31 May, 4:45PM)

My first session choice is an expert panel, led by Marianne Calilhanna from Cenveo Publisher Services, about the entire lifecycle of metadata throughout the publishing workflow. This topic couldn’t be more timely or relevant, as it’s becoming increasingly clear that scholarly publishing can only be as good as our data.  I’m looking forward to hearing a detailed analysis how metadata flows—and sometimes gets caught—during the publishing workflow.

Sponsored Session: Diversity & Inclusion (Wednesday, May 30, 1:30PM)

My second pick is a sponsored session, moderated by my wonderful colleague, Rebecca Mcleod. She’ll be leading a very important discussion about the culture of the scholarly publishing community—specifically around efforts to create a more diverse and inclusive environment that welcomes people of all backgrounds. I’m really looking forward to this meaningful discussion and to hearing the panel’s thoughts on ways we can improve and grow together as a community.

Kurt Heisler, Sales Director

Plenary: Previews Session (Friday 1 June, 11:00AM)

The Previews Session is a roundup of the industry’s newest and most noteworthy products, platforms and content. I’m really looking forward to this one and think it’ll be a great synopsis of the most important recent developments in scholarly publishing; a definite “must-attend” on my calendar.

Session 2A – How Do We Move the Goal of Open Access from Concept to Reality? (Thursday 31 May, 2:00PM)

Moderated by ALPSP’s Audrey McCulloch, this session promises to be an informed and pragmatic analysis of the state of OA, including a rundown of some of the biggest challenges stakeholders are facing today. As the scholarly publishing industry begins to search for and uncover ways we can streamline the research workflow, I’m really looking forward to hearing the speakers offer their takes on ways we can improve.

Chuck Hemenway, Sales Director

Virtual Meeting Session 5A: Funders as Publishers—What does this mean for traditional publishers and the scholarly publishing industry as a whole…? (Friday 1 June, 11:00AM)

My first session pick, moderated by Sheridan PubFactory’s Tom Beyer, will take a look at the rise of publisher-funders like, Wellcome Trust. These firsts-of-their-kind are still finding their place within the market so I’m keen to hear the industry experts on this ticket offer their perspectives on how publisher-funders might find their place within—or perhaps disrupt—the scholarly publishing market.

Virtual Meeting Session 1D: The Gift That Keeps on Giving: Metadata & Persistent Identifiers Through the Research & Publication Cycle (Thursday 31 May, 10:30AM)

My second pick—and the session I’m most excited to attend—is this panel, lead by Ringgold’s Christine Orr, about metadata throughout the scholarly lifecycle. It’s becoming increasingly clear that we’re simply not doing enough with our metadata and that we’re missing opportunities to collect valuable information that would make the research workflow more seamless for everyone. I’m really looking forward to hearing what these industry heavyweights have to say about our current state and how we, as a community, can improve.

Darren Gillgrass, Business Development Director

Session 3F: (Don’t) Rage Against The Machine

My first session pick promises to be a forward-thinking discussion about why—and how—we should better incorporate computer-assisted mining activities into the scholarly, academic and research library communities. Moderated by DMedia’s David Myers, the panel’s experts are well-equipped to make the case for utilizing technology to better facilitate scientific progress. Looking forward to hearing their perspectives on how we can ensure the scholarly publishing community keeps pace with technology and benefits from its advances.

Session 2D: Unlimited Data Plans? Data Publication Charges (DPCs), DPC Sponsors, Data Availability Statements, and Licensing Options (Thursday 31 May, 2:00PM)

My next pick is a session about lesser-known article fees: data publication charges—or DPCs. Moderated by Anna Jester from eJournal Press, this session features four organizations which currently either require authors to deposit data or support authors in complying with data mandates. These data experts will explore what DPCs mean to scholarly publishing, from operational realities, to licensing, and beyond.

Which sessions are you looking forward to attending? Tell us in the comments section!

We hope to see you in Chicago. Follow along on social media with #SSP2018.

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